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24

Yep, the second one is far better for precisely the reason you say. A general rule is that you shouldn't have dotted-notes that start on an off beat and carry through the next beat. There are exceptions even to this rule, but showing the underlying beat structure of the meter is paramount in the vast majority of situations. Elliott Carter is an example of ...


21

Time signatures and bars are not there arbitrarily, nor just to help count your way through a piece. They are there to provide guidance on the rhythm of the piece. Where it is accented, where it breathes. Some composers do write pieces with no time signature or bars, as an indication that there should be no consistent rhythm. Eric Satie did this for several ...


19

Your understanding of the math, as it were, is correct. And I would say yes, a multiple of 4 bars of music in 3/4 can be expressed as music in 4/4 (in a multiple of 3 bars), but I would dispute that the same can necessarily be represented as such. The bar line placement of a piece of music has tremendous impact upon live musicians' interpretation of, not to ...


8

If you are referring strictly to music written obeying to traditional rhythmic conventions (with rational time signatures and regular/even division), then your second example is more suitable. Please keep in mind that the first example is not wrong, but the second will make sight-reading much easier, as our own expectations when seeing a piece in 4/4 make us ...


7

Since both of them are flat, it is the same interval they would be without flats. So: Bb - Eb would be the same as B - E which is perfect fourth. Bb - Ab would be the same as B - A which is minor 7th. Bb -Db would be the same as B - D which is minor 3rd.


5

The answers provided here offer a useful trick, which is to quickly translate into a scale you already know to find the answer. For instance, if you know that C to E is a major third, then it must be the case that Cb to Eb is a major third and also that C# to E# is a major third, too. It's fine to use this trick when it comes in handy, but it sounds like ...


5

Here's a common chart showing how the notes break down: Notice how each row is a full measure in 4/4. The general rule is that a note can span its direct children, or one of its children and one of its nephews. That is, a quarter note can span the 2nd and 3rd eighth notes, but not the 4th and 5th. A dotted note can only borrow from its sibling, not its ...


4

Usually, polychords are written like this: (with a fraction). So, let's say you have Am {fraction} G7 and we are in the C major scale. You could symbolize that as VIm {fraction} V. Notice that for the polychords, there is no slash, but a fraction. Slashes are for the slash chords or hybrid chords (inversions). For the slash chords inversions, if the ...


3

What you have here is mostly fine but I would do a couple modifications. Namely, I would put the rests in the first and second measures below the 1/2 notes. This way they look more like being rests in the 1/8-note-voice. If you don't like this then at least put the rests in the second measure either above or below the 1/2 notes because now it looks like the ...


3

If everything has to be in the same staff (i.e. to be played by one hand) the excerpt you show in your question is fine for Keyboard. If you want to make clear that the half-notes that come together are different voices you can put the stems up for the top ones and down for the bottom ones. But this is not necessary unless you are writing poliphonic-style ...


3

The ideal is to keep each beat self-contained, so the second is preferrable.In 4/4 it's certainly best to keep each half of the bar separate, so anything which goes between beats 2 and 3 are shown as tied.It's easier to read, and the ties actually make you aware that the tune is syncopated.The same thing should happen in 6/8 too, which is effectively two ...


3

The reason for the discrepancy is that there are generally far fewer winds and brass in an orchestra, and so the individual parts are usually numbered. Thus, you might see a part labeled with individual numbers (such as "1. 2." for different flute or oboe parts, for instance, or a marking such as "a 2" to indicate that they should play together. Since for ...


2

How about using acciaccaturas? Sure, you won't get exactly the triplet rhythms, but if you want those exactly you wouldn't use ornaments. This is how it would look: You could use a pair of acciaccaturas each time with a single (quaver) beam, but the double beam seems more in keeping with the surrounding music to me, and suggests the rapidity with which ...


2

Or, to put it another way, Νo. 10 -Bb- A is a major 7th, so to Ab is a minor 7th. No. 11 - Bb - D is a major 3rd., so to Db is a minor 3rd.


2

You don't say what your native instrument is, but if it is flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, trumpet, horn or trombone, take a look at an orchestral score of a piece you have played, and compare for instance the first and second flute parts with the one flute staff in the score. The two parts are compressed into one line. Whenever the two flutes are playing ...


2

A nice example of a composer playing with the written vs sounding time signature is the second movement of Ravel's G Major Piano Concerto. It is written in 3/4 and sounds like it's a slow waltz in the left hand, but the left hand isn't playing a normal 3/4 waltz rhythm — it is playing eight-notes putting the pulse on beat 1 on the second eighth note of beat ...


1

Simple test for you to try. Take 'Frere Jacques', a well known song. Re-write it in 3 time.Ask a player to play it. Chances are that it will sound very different. That's because the emphasis in a song comes on the first note of a bar.Particularly notable when words are involved ! In 4 this is every 4, in 3, every 3.It also puts the 'main' notes in different ...



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