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10

Different notations have traditions of being used in different contexts. All of those are correct. I suspect the reason for such variety comes from use by non-academically trained musicians. Without formal, standardized training, musicians tend to come up with a shorthand that expresses what they want while being generally agreeable. Correlations may be ...


10

Accidentals (sharps, flats or naturals) only change notes until the end of the bar they are in. So, the C# above doesn't affect the C in the next bar. However, flats or sharps in key-signatures affect all notes in the music, for instance the Bb and Eb above, unless "overruled" by another accidental, for example the B natural above.


6

None is more correct; but there are tactical reasons that certain types of players prefer certain formats. For example, jazz guys tend to like the following for major, minor, dominant seventh, and half-diminished qualities: A∆, A-, A7, Aø The reason is, aside from its popularity among the musicians they play with, that the shapes are easily ...


6

There is no Cb in the key sig. In fact, Cb rarely appears in a key sig.Since there is a bar line preceding the C, any accidentals would be cancelled.So it couldn't be a C#.There is no reason at all why it should be a Cb.(Often called B, often incorrectly...) Therefore, it is played as a simple C natural, the white one on a piano.


5

The letters Above mean the Implied/intended harmony. There are 2 possibilities I see here as to why an F and C7 are listed. If you are playing solo There are certain common chord progressions in music. The go-to example always seems to be I-V-I, and what this means is that the chords move from the first/tonic chord of the scale(in this case F, to the ...


4

Must simply be notation for a barre across the fourth fret, as this would also be for the subsequent G#. Admittedly, this is not the most conventional notation, but it is certainly valid. EDIT: this kind of bracket is commonly used in bowed string (eg. violin) music, to denote double-stopped notes, which may sometimes be with the same finger, and so are an ...


3

Using uppercase for the note names of all chords will yield a consistent appearance, which can be very important if a page has a lot of other text on it. The amount of visual processing can be minimized if major chords just use the latter, minor chords just use an "m", and major-minor seventh chords [sometimes called "dominant sevenths"] just use a "7". ...


3

Mainly they have been written in for guitarists. The R.H. and L.H. for the piano player are there in place, so the tune will sound good as is. However, as Alexander points out, there are often more notes available for each part of a tune, as in a C7 is made from C-E-G-Bb, but not all of them are used by the composer all the time. Guitarists sometimes ...


2

The key (Bb Major/G minor) has a signature of two flats (Bb and Eb). So, all notes except these two will be natural unless they are modified by an accidental (sharp, flat, or natural). When a note is modified by an accidental, all following notes of the same pitch in that measure will be modified by the same unless they have another accidental. So, the C# ...


2

I would advise you take some time to learn how to read sheet music. Teoria has a set of beginner tutorials that will really help you to understand how music notation works, and how to understand what all the symbols and notes mean. That said, on to the question. Key Signatures In the key signature(the 2 b signs on the left) you have a Bb and an Eb. this ...


2

According to the image, it looks like you might have a recording that came with the book, so I would certainly suggest listening for how it is meant to be phrased. Technique-wise, since this is a ukulele, you'll be finger picking everything. Commonly you'll see grace notes appear on the same string, which means you would use a hammer-on or pull-off by ...


2

The way this is written is just incorrect. You can guess what it means: you have to hold the base note while you play the other notes. But I insist: the way it's written is just wrong; it is not an acceptable notation. In these cases you just write the base note with its correct duration as a different voice. [EDIT] A correct way of writing this: [EDIT] ...


1

This is something that I generally wouldn't write myself when typesetting or editing a piece of music, but is nonetheless an acceptable notation for piano music involving arpeggios. You interpret it simply by ignoring the notated value of the first note except to figure out where the next note in the arpeggio should be. Just hold the note through the ...


1

I hadn't really thought about the "engraving" standard, but in the diatonic tonal world, there are two answers: In equal temperament there are 24 "keys", if by key you mean tonal structure based on some transposition of the major or minor scale. In non-equal temperament, especially in pure just intonation, there are no enharmonic equivalents (Gb ≠ F#), ...



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