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22

They are actually eighth note triplets instead of eighth notes. The alternative notation to this would be to group the eighth notes and rests in threes and put a 3 over them like a standard triplet, but it's easy enough to see that you are fitting 12 equally spaced notes in a measure which end up being eighth note triplets which would kind of screw up the ...


19

The eighth notes in the left hand are all triplets. The ones in the right hand are normal. Note how the note heads line up vertically in measure 4. On a purely technical level, this is incorrect notation. But it's something that can be figured out pretty easily, so I guess Liszt either didn't care or wrote it like that for artistic reasons.


12

In support of the other answers here, I have re-notated this passage in your example to emphasize the triplets. This is the exact same passage of music (unless I have made a typo or two) but using extra symbols to make it more explicit. Note that in measure 4 you are required to play "two against three": your right hand is in a duple rhythm while your left ...


11

Simple answer: yes and yes. The first note immediately after the G clef is G below middle C; the first note after the F clef is, as you say, C an octave below middle C.


6

Yes it stays in the same key. There is a very specific way to notate a key change on sheet music and in this case if it were changing to the key of C major/A minor you would see all the places there would be flats have naturals in their place. You can even see in the chord symbol that the D notes are still flat in that measure.


5

Ordinarily, I'd say this is simply a "laissez vibrer" instruction (playing a chord, releasing your fingers but sustaining it with the pedal). But the unconnected quaver head in the 10th bar is definitely a misprint, so that lowers my confidence in the entire score - the slurs might also be misprints (maybe an entire chord is missing?).


5

Marking the score 3/4 for 3 measures and then 4/4 for one, seems to fit nicely. Another thing you could try, is to mark the 4th measure as 12/8 (which works with 4 groups of 3 eighths each). Personally, I think I would choose the first option, 4/4.


4

A bit more information is needed. In the 4/4 bar, are the quarter notes the same length as in the 3/4 bars? In other words, is the quarter note constant (thus yielding 13 total pulses) or is each bar to be the same length (the quarters in the last bar are only 3/4 the duration as in the other bars.) Both of these are legitimate possibilities. If the quarter ...


4

For a temporary change of clef, there is no need. However, if the 'left hand' continues to use the bass clef , say, in the next line, it will revert to the proper key sig., with the four flats (in this case) in the appropriate places for the bass clef, which obviously will be signed.


3

Actually, normal practice is to omit the first ending measures from the count and number the second ending measures. If the bar number of the first bar of the first ending would normally be, say, m.31, the first bar of the second ending is m.31. If you need to refer to these two measures separately, you would refer to them as m.31 and m.31 bis (or m.31b) ...


3

On the one hand, you of course have detailed voicings, where each part is written out exactly in the sheet music. On the other hand, as Dom has pointed out in comments, you have a "lead sheet" which is simply a written out melody, along with chord symbols written above. This mostly looks like what you wrote out, but without the rhythm slashes. Technically, I ...


2

Yes the key signature remains the same. Piano music may have several instances where both hands play high and really there is no reason to reiterate the key signature when the change of clef is just to not use unruly ledger lines.


2

It's a red herring! It's not a tie, and they're not staccato, per se. It's a separate sign called 'portato',or more accurately and easily understood 'articulated legato', and if it was applied to notes that were not the same, obviously it couldn't be a tie. A slur it would be. Now, you can see that two slurred notes separated because they need to be ...


2

This is an articulation symbol called semi-staccato. It is meant to be performed exactly as its name implies; halfway between smoothly connected and detached, with only a slight disconnect between the notes. For any wind instrument, the semi-staccato notes in bars 2-3 would be performed with a very gentled tonguing on the notes indicated, such as using a ...


2

Those are "laissez-vibrer" ties: you just let the notes ring on. Comparing the top occurence of this construct with the following one makes it likely that the excess ties without proper reference may be a printing error and should instead be attached to the last three notes of the top voice. The next occurences show a second voice with explicitly prolonged ...


2

I'd interpret it as a printing error!. Five (poss.) bars later, there's a note head with no tail. Also it looks like it's in 6/8, but with unusual joining of the 'triplets'. The three 'slurs' are actually referring to only one note there, whereas bar 9 at least has 3 'slurs' for 3 notes. Who's it by and what is it? EDIT : the quaver rest doesn't help much, ...


2

You can combine notes and chord slashes. From the Rocky Horror PC score: This way of notating also has the benefit that the player can still do something even if he doesn't know that much theory. You could do the same thing and just drop everything but the top note.


2

I suggest the same direction as @ToddWilcox. But why not take it further and use Erik Satie as a model for humorous direction or narrative in a score? See this example in Sonatine Bureaucratique http://imslp.org/wiki/File:Sonatine.pdf This text is not performance direction, but is makes clear Satie's humorous intentions. The important point is don't worry ...


1

I have no idea what "cut." would be an abbreviation for but "S.D." most likely means "snare drum". See this very similar question: What does Opt. S.D. mean?


1

I can only imagine that the sign is like D$, (del segno) which means go to the place where $ is shown, and play from there. Sometimes it's just DS with the $ at the beginning of where to go next. A pic would help.


1

I would hold a slightly different opinion to those already given and say the proper notation is 12 in the time of eight which is played the same as four triplets but still this is 12 in the time of eight. The person that did the transcription probably felt the marking for twelve in the time of 8 would be to hard and left you to scratch you head instead.


1

There's not One True Way to do it. There are a few different methods that make sense in different contexts. In musical theater, every measure gets its own unique measure number so that places in the music can be unambiguously referred to by everyone. (In fact, this idea is so important that if music is added or removed, the measure numbers stay where they ...


1

I'm quite certain it's a type of laissez vibrer. I would interpret it to mean that I should leave the whole current chord in the pedal. The placement of the ties is a little odd but comparing to the following lines you see that the same idea repeats. It also explains the missing rests: there should be no silence. The first rest is probably there to make it ...


1

This looks to me like the score was rendered in some piece of software that, due to some layout conflict, has failed to render some of the notes of the piece at all. It also looks like the score is off by an eighth note from proper alignment...this happens sometimes when writing a score in music layout software that treats music as a list of notes. It's ...


1

These are solfege (or solfa) symbols. The exact mapping is dependent on what system you are using (fixed Do or movable Do). In fixed Do every solfege symbol maps to a specific note. In this, Do maps to C, Re maps to D, Mi maps to E, Fa maps to F, Sol maps to G, La maps to A, and Ti maps to B. In movable Do, the notes map to the degrees of the scale you ...


1

JUST with reference to Steve's post which is highly informative. A g2 chord would not contain the major third hence it would like G,A,D. THE G A B D CHORD is G add second or G add ninth, YOU don't need to worry about the octave the A is in; what determines its character as an add ninth is the fact that the dominant seventh has not been included. THE same is ...


1

Adding onto Sergio's excellent answer: There are multiple ways in which enharmonic notes (notes of essentially the same pitch with different names, such as A# and Bb) come into play, as it were. One is with respect to different tunings. Sergio's answer cites a table that concerns two tunings, equal and just. There are in fact lots and lots of tunings, many ...


1

Enharmonic notes are different, e.g. G# and A-flat, even though it is not always the case that instruments make different sounds for these different notes. These different note names are used to indicate differences in terms of the melodic or harmonic content of the music. For example, in A minor, G# is frequently encountered as the "leading tone" back to ...



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