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11

In this particular quartet, the solid bar lines are being used for coordination, but the instruments themselves are following their own metres which are demarcated by the dotted bar lines: the music is polymetric. The beaming across the bar line confirms this interpretation. In the first example, the first violin is counting 4/8, 5/8, 3/8, 4/8; the 2nd ...


6

Unfortunately, there's no clear indication why the degree symbol (°) was chosen to represent diminished harmonies. We do have some information about when and how it originated, though; specifically, it arose in conjunction with the use of Roman numerals in harmonic analysis. During the Baroque period, harmonies were notated in shorthand using figured bass. ...


5

This sort of notation normally means a "semi-barline". I have seen it where (e.g.) a 4/4 bar is divided into two halves by a dotted barline, meaning "It's in 4/4, but well you might also feel it in 2/4". This example is a bit more difficult, but then it is Bartok. I would guess that the parts are supposed to "feel" the tempo divided into different ways. ...


4

While there are bows for baroque performance that you can interactively tense with the thumb, those are not really historical. The historical bows still have less tension, however, and a convex rather than hollow curve which makes playing multiple strings easier. Also baroque violin style tends to play less in higher positions and, related to that, there ...


3

Right after the time signature change you see a natural sign, which would not be necessary for the assumed implicit key signature reset. Key signatures are very important and therefore very explicit. For a change of the key signature typically all existing accidentals are first neutralized and then the new ones added.


2

There's no reason, really, that it's better the other way. If you keep thinking as you have been, it works for you (and me !). When it has to be translated into real chords for a particular key, then the real chords will be written. At that point, anyone playing the piece will know what to play. I, IV and V in a major key will be the same letter names as i, ...


2

To call such chord a Dominant surely saves time and it is practical thing to do when your theory knowledge is strong. However the "major, minor 7th" perfectly describes all the intervals -omitting the fifth- and it is a more straightforward approach to chord learning.


1

The standard way that I learned in music school is that in a major key, the tonic-subdominant-dominant chords are all major and therefore are notated in upper case Roman numerals: I - IV - V. Arabic numbers are for individual notes, for example "3" is the third note in the scale (starting from the bottom). For a minor key, generally speaking tonic is ...


1

I'd say to always use the key-chord as 1. I'm a classical guy and never really got NNS. Maybe this is somewhat from ignorance, so downvotes are welcome. :) My biggest problem with many chord description systems is that they don't handle complexity with clarity or can't describe some chords - half-diminished seventh chords are a typical case. There are ...


1

The only time a key signature changes is when the composer labels it as such. Using the image you provided as an example, the piece would remain in E major, until at some point in the song, the composer states that the piece is to be played in let's say G major. I have taken piano lessons for ten years, and on occasion dabble in composition.



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