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11

Related: How does one describe the level of playing that is neither piano nor forte? As I see it, you're assuming that all mp are the same, and that an mp written in a Wagnerian music drama is the same as the mp written in a Britten opera, which is the same as an mp written in a Chopin polonaise, which is the same as the mp written in a transcription to a ...


11

There is a possibility of addressing this question historically... My understanding (which is possibly apocryphal) is that mf came before mp, and originally meant "normal volume". To explain, "forte" has two meanings, in the same way that the English word "loud" can both Mean "high volume" — as in "play it loud" — and Refer to the concept of loudness more ...


10

There isn't one. The composer must specify a dynamic at the outset. Neither mf or mp mean a great deal out of context. I guess mf is a bit nearer to "ordinary" than mp.


9

More than likely it shows note timing for another verse, where there are different words which need to be sung/played in a slightly different rhythm.There doesn't seem to be a hard and fast rule as to whether the tail on the smaller note follows the main note's tail or goes in the opposite direction, but it makes sense that the value of each note will be ...


8

Sharp - ^ Flat - _ Natural - = From The abc music standard 2.1 (Dec 2011) The symbols ^, = and _ are used (before a note) to notate respectively a sharp, natural or flat. Double sharps and flats are available with ^^ and __ respectively.


7

A simple google(*) finds the following tutorial: http://www.lesession.co.uk/abc/abc_notation.htm#sharps sharp: ^f flat: _b natural: =c Note that the accidental precedes the note. (*) When googling for information about ABC, it often helps to add the word "notation" to the search, to weed out false positives.


6

That's exactly it. Most players are better playing block chords with l.h. and the fiddly bits with r.h., so the composer has designated cross hand playing.A good player could play it either way, though. It looks sort of good as well!I reckon that the l.h. is actually playing the 1st and 3rd bass notes with l.h. too. Otherwise the stretch would be a 10th, or ...


5

You'll have to represent it with a tie. In 4/4, the simplest and most direct way is to represent it with a quarter note tied to a 16th note as such:


5

When the Mordent sign is used in front of the note it actually indicates a slide. If you can excuse the poor photo of the source material I think it can still be of some worth to you. It says the following... THE SLIDE. This is written as a Mordent sign before a note, and consists of the two notes below the principal note taken consecutively, and leading ...


4

Since I can't attach an image to a comment: @guidot said in a comment he was "unconvinced" by non-professional engraving here. I agree that in the OP's image the ornament seems to have been "faked" (and rather crudely), but the same ornament appears in the (old, hand-engraved) Bach-Gesellschaft Ausgabe, Band 25: http://ks.imslp.info/files/imglnks/usimg/6/...


4

The books I've seen suggest that when you solo over a dominant seventh chord, try playing a half-whole diminished scale. The reason this works is that the scale contains all the notes of the dominant seventh chord. Here's the half-whole scale starting on C together with the C7 chord: H-W dim scale: C C# D# E F# G A A# C C7 chord: C E G Bb ...


4

Start off by finding some tabs (or sheet music, if you can read that) that will teach you the three octatonic (=diminished) scales. Or, you can just figure them out for yourself; it's pretty easy! There are only three of them, and they all alternate half-steps and whole-steps. So pick a pitch--any pitch!--and: Start alternating half and whole steps. After ...


4

It depends on the kind of sound that you're looking for. If you need / want really specifically placed vocables, then you would notate the pitch, rhythm, and exact measure / beat among other info. If you don't care or it doesn't matter, then just give her the pitches for reference and let her go to town (read: using instinct). If you'd like her to ...


4

This is a relatively common occurrence, and it's a very easy fix! You can just write "first time only" or "second time only," depending on the situation. For clarity, I'd write "both times" by the final three articulations (if I understood you correctly). Note that this could also be done with a first and second ending situation, but for something this ...


4

The time signature cannot be figured out from the content since both 2/2 and 4/4 have a whole note all-in-all but have different accents and drive. It's even worse with 6/8 and 3/4. The repetition of the key signature is just a visual reminder since the key signature pervades a piece. If you start the piece from the second page, it would be really awkward ...


3

Medieval German notation for modal music (for all instruments and voices, not just for fretted stringed instruments) was essentially tablature, but using letter names for the notes instead of fret numbers as in modern tab notation. In early modal music, the only "altered" notes were B flat and B natural, which were written using different "square" and "round"...


3

There are two possibilities. He may be reading "brass band treble", a major 9th higher than sounding pitch. In this case the part would be in treble clef throughout, and the musical context would be a British tradition brass band. Or he may be reading a concert pitch part which has ventured into treble clef from its usual bass clef.


3

The chord is actually a Csus2 which contains the notes C, D, and G or in intervals a root, Major 2nd, and Perfect 5th. C5/2 is an odd way to notate it that should not be used as it looks too much like a slash chord. It would look something like this on the staff: X: 1 M: 2/4 K: Cmaj L: 2/4 |[CDG]||


3

Well, this was a nice distraction, thanks! First off, what piece, or composer, is this? (I'm just curious.) Here's what I've got: I chose this route for a few reasons: The odd time signatures may seem strange, but it's certainly not written in 4/4. You'll need to have a few oddities and a few changes in an excerpt like this, it's just the facts of ...


2

Take a look at page 19 of this PDF from the University of Florida: It definitely seems to be an indication for a natural harmonic. I know @Richard said a harmonic was notated differently, but perhaps he was thinking of an artificial harmonic? As for the lack of centering, I can see that as a typesetting issue.


2

Believe it or not, I'm pretty certain this is just the worst-placed and worse-shaped piece of fuzz to ever find its way onto a scanner, because: The symbol is not actually centered with the note head. The symbol doesn't appear to actually be a circle. The symbol doesn't appear anywhere else in the book (as far as I can tell). The nearest notation I can ...


1

Depending on context this may mean a number of different things: it could be a used in a different verse as Tim suggest, but since you state "pokemon theme" I have some doubts, whether any text exists it could be some sort of embellishment (grace note), where the big note indicates the dotted quarter as total duration and the small says, that it is ...


1

Even in cases where you can figure out the time signature (there are cases where you can't), the part is not supposed to be a puzzle. It's supposed to make things as clear as possible to the player. Key signatures can often change so it's good to be reminded at every line what the current key signature is. Sometimes, on lead sheets of simple tunes that ...


1

Sure, you can generally discover the time after a few bars. But why not know it BEFORE the first note? It will make more sense of the conductor's upbeat when sight-playing, if nothing else. There's a "fake book" style where after the first line not only time signature but also key signature and clef are omitted. It's not helpful, particularly in e.g. a ...


1

'Tempo' in this piece means to return to the original speed. Before, there was a ritardando, meaning to slow down, so now you should return to the original tempo.


1

Looking thru the Dolmetsch online, I found a couple interesting suggestions. First, the Bach-specific set of ornaments, and then the symbol called custos (Latin), Wachte (German), guida (Italian), guidon (French) or 'direct', placed at the end of a line to indicate the pitch of the first note on the next line (from the front page ) . However, as ...


1

Bachs autograph here in wikipedia shows something similar: the round tail (first line, last two bars) appears on the left side and indicates a three-note-group followed by the zig-zag line symbolizing the alteration between two notes, and the direction of the tail indicates, whether the notes descend or ascend. I would conclude, that in your example the ...


1

It looks like the idea of these "slapped" chords is to produce the sound of the snare on 2 and 4 in a rock groove -- the "chick" to the "boom" of the bass drum. There are lots of ways to do this; Quevado's style is pretty subtle, but you can be much more rhythmic, like this guy shows: In essence, I wouldn't obsess over the ...


1

I think you are misreading. X is usually used to denote damped strings. So in the first example you'd go from a partial Am (minus the E on the 3rd string) and then as you pop that E on you need to damp the open A in order that when it is played you just hear the damped noise of it being picked, but no note ringing out. It is possible the X could be used ...


1

(I guess some or most of the following was possibly written elsewhere above -- I didn't see it all before I posted) If proficient at both, I believe that standard music notation ('sheet music') is the better option for the guitar 'musician'. This is especially true if it's used as a 'communication' tool where the sound of the piece of music is unknown to ...



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