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27

These are called "cues" and they show you what other instruments are playing while you have rests. They are normally placed right before an entrance, particularly after a long section of not playing, so that you can be sure of when to come in. "Tromb. e Tuba" means that these notes are being played by the trombone and tuba. (The markings in this music are ...


24

In a key where there are already some sharps (or flats) in the key sig., as here, every time one of those notes is played, it has to be sharp (or flat). In E, or C#m, the key here, every other note is natural - E, A, and B. So if a note sounding like a C needs to be played, it can't just be written as a C, because the player would automatically sharpen it, ...


16

They're cue notes. Notice the "Tromb.e Tuba" below them, indicating that the trombones and tuba(s) are playing those. It's there to reassure you that you've counted the rests properly.


14

Standard music notation and Tablature (Tab) can both tell a guitarist what notes to play. But each can do certain things better than the other. Tablature is a common and increasingly popular form of music notation for stringed fretted instruments. It has the advantage of a very short learning curve and does not require extensive study to learn. It is ...


13

p-i-m-a indicate which finger to pluck with (thumb, index, middle and ring, the letters come from the Spanish names), and thus are guitar specific. Similarly the small numbers to the left of the noteheads indicate which left hand finger to use to fret that note. The diamond shaped notes are natural harmonics. I believe that the way it is notated here is: ...


12

The note is the same key as C. It is written as B# instead of "C natural" to indicate note's "role" according to rules of classical (musical) harmony. My guess is this portion of musical piece is written in Cis-moll, and the arrpegio being played is dominant chord (G# B# D# F#). Because in minor tonalities Dominant chord always has VIIth tone (B is VIIth ...


12

Yes a B# is just a C, but it is written that way because that note is function like a "B" instead of a "C". If you look at the notes you have G#, B#, and F#. Look familiar? It's a G# dominant 7th (5th is omitted, but thats not unheard of). A more focused question on this idea can be seen in this question as to why notes get alternative names.


9

You're right it's just a dotted eighth note and a sixteenth note. The bar across the top is called a beam and it is typically used to group smaller notes by beats. For example that pattern in 4/4 would take up one of the four quarters note beats. Grouping them together clearly shows they make one beat in 4/4.


8

The wavy vertical lines to the left of the chords mean "arpeggio": in other words, you are being told to roll the chords. Given that both both passages have Ped indications (the lines and carets under the bass stave in the first excerpt), you aren't obliged to hold the notes with your fingers, so you can indeed cross hands in the first passage. (Edit: To ...


7

If it was written as C, it would be actually C# ... because you have four sharps on left (those ####) and they basically mean that: F = F# G = G# C = C# D = D# Which is E major. Instead, they write it as B# because they want you to play actual C. It could be also written as a C with a natural sign ♮ ... the natural sign would "cancel out" the sharp # on ...


7

These groups of multiple notes are called chords. It does in fact mean to play all the notes at the same time. The notes you pictured appear to be notation for piano. The two staffs pictured are the treble and bass staffs. The notes on the lower staff are played with the left hand and the upper staff notes are played with the right hand. And yes, ...


6

Yes they do because they are the key signature of a piece. The key signature tells you what key you are in and what notes to expect. Since you are in the key of E major, you will most likely use the notes E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D# which the four sharps represent. Those are the notes you should use unless a different accidental is applied to a note.


6

I feel like tabs are always inappropriate, and are a horrible crutch for far too many guitarists that keeps them from understanding their instrument and music in general at a deeper level. If you need to indicate that a particular passage is to be played in a specific way, then there are good ways to do this (usually just indicating the position is enough) ...


6

I highly recommend using standard notation always. Even if your original intention is for the music to be read by guitarists only, if you use tab then other instrumentalists or vocalists will not be able to play what you've written. In many band situations, it can be useful for pianists, saxophonists etc to check out what the guitarist is doing - even if ...


5

There really isn't something like that. The closest thing is a simile where you could write a rhythm pattern and then put the chord changes over the similes as shown in this answer. Music notation in general is very exact to make sure the musician playing the song know exactly how to play it.


5

I would just like to clarify a couple things that I don't think have been fully articulated. First is that there is a distinction to be understood between the concepts of "note" and "pitch". A note is a symbol in a score. It represents a pitch to be sounded. Enharmonic equivalence is idea that the same pitch can be represented by different note names. ...


5

The other answer didn't explain exactly, but in the first case, you're supposed to cross over and play the top note with your left hand. So you roll the LH chord, then continue the roll into the RH, and finally cross over and play the top note with your left hand. The pedal will keep everything sounding. The second example is just a simple one-handed ...


5

To be honest - I think you may be fine just ignoring them as you have been doing. I usually do. First let's talk a bit about music notation for guitar. In my experience, most music notation for guitar written for Rock, Classic Rock, Pop, Country, Folk (and many other types of popular music that is not strictly instrumental) is nothing more than someones ...


4

Add disclaimer Some people apparently couldn't understand what I was getting at with this answer, or don't understand humour or whatever, and therefore flagged the answer. I assure you that any misspellings found here are entirely enharmonic in nature, and thus don't matter. Or do they? If you think so, you've got the point I'm making. It is knot a C. ...


4

This is "JianPu" or "numbered musical notation". Wikipedia on Jianpu mentions some software tools, but most of them seem to require knowledge of chinese (since that notation system is mostly used in china). A (quite old but free) tool is "S-Music". Simp-Erhu is another free tool, but it requires MS Word. There's also a comparison of four free Jianpu ...


4

As Dom states, each and every stave is a separate entity, and accidentals need to be put in for each changed note. This is in D minor (at least here), and what's happening is the normal melodic minor trick of that era. Melodies going downwards would use a natural minor configuration, while those rising would have a raised 6th and 7th. Thus, Bbs in the left ...


4

I don't like tabs because they tie you to a specific tuning, if you tune your guitar differently then tabs become quickly worthless. Also for each note you have to remember what is basically a 2 dimensional coordinate (fret number and string number) when only one value is needed for each note. And lastly they remove all notions of tonality, diatonic function ...


3

Anytime in written music that there are multiple staffs, they are all played simultaneously. Exactly who plays/sings what part will depend on the context of the music. Typically, in vocal music with two staffs, the upper staff (with the treble clef) will contain the female parts (Soprano and Alto), while the lower staff (with the bass clef) will contain the ...


3

That looks like C# minor which gets its leading tone (B) raised by a semitone. You are correct in thinking that B# and C are played at the same place but for the purposes of music theory they are not the same notes. They are what is called enharmonic equivalents ie two notes with different names played at the same place.


3

It's nothing whatsoever to do with imaginary problems in writing a C natural! It's about spelling a major 3rd above G# correctly, and making the interval LOOK like a 3rd, not a 4th.


3

My bet is on the 8vb only applying to the left hand. The A1 in the left hand is supposed to be held, and if the right hand would then play another A1, this would disrupt the holding of the left hand A1. While this kind of disruption for voice-leading purposes is not rare in piano music, in this instance it would cause an imbalance in the decay of the ...


3

It's Scientific Pitch Notation that is used to notate the note itself and the octave it is in. For example E2 tells you that it is specifically the E on the first ledger line under the bass clef.


3

The advantage of tablature is that it can more easily show the exact shapes and fingerings to use, if that's important. Meanwhile, standard notation has a better-defined system for notating rhythms. If the harmony of the piece is diatonic or largely diatonic, standard notation will give a much better view of the melodic and harmonic workings of a piece. If ...


3

The advantage is that tabs are easy to follow. But the disadvantages are that 1) too many players never develop their reading chops past tabs and can never function outside of the guitar world, which is where all of the other musicians live. 2) dove-tailing on #1 - tabs are only useful for a stringed-instrument player obviously, so attempting to ...


2

I am fairly certain the sheet music is for concertina, specifically chemnitzer concertina. Here is an image of some chemnitzer concertina notation: A text description of the notation method is difficult to find online but this image: should help translate if you are indeed looking to play the music on a concertina or transpose to your piano accordion. ...



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