Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

There are oodles of tab-reading tutorials out there so I'll keep this basic (just google-search "how to read guitar tabs"). The "lowest" string on the paper is your "lowest" string pitchwise (your low-E) but the "highest" string physically (closest to you). Each number represents the fret number to hold down and play. We move from left to right and play ...


4

There is a notation form I have come across called Sagittal notation. It seems pretty comprehensive for microtonic notation. The Sagittal notation system is a comprehensive system for notating musical pitch in all possible scales and tunings - a universal set of microtonal accidentals, equally suited to extended just intonation, equal divisions of the ...


2

Yes, indeed. The time signature together with an understanding of the musical style of the period in which the music was written tell you what the rhythm is and what the accents are supposed to be in general. Specific notes in specific measures might be written in such a way as to over-ride the default pattern. For example, in classical music in general, in ...


2

Well, it wouldn't make sense otherwise, would it? It can't be a tie since those are only between two adjacent noteheads (which need to have the same pitch and would not be used to connect two eighth notes when the first is on the beat: you'd just write a quarter), so one wants to hear four notes. Which is what your fellows produced. Now the question is ...


1

In keeping with the melodic and rhythmic elements Chopin is working with, his intention is to flatten the sixth degree of Eb (key) - i.e., the C. This happens to be the enharmonic equivalent of B. Regardless, his intentions lead him to write Cb. This is an idiosyncratic feature of the key of Eb. Flattening the sixth of other major scales does not lead to ...


1

I haven't checked the sheet music, but in any case, a Cb is enharmonically the same as a B natural. As is always the case, the flat just lowers the note by a semi-tone.


1

It turns out that the closest approximation to this articulation is a scoop. Many thanks to @MatthewRead for pointing me to the glissando family where I found the scoop (and also the plop, doit and fall) articulation. While this is not the normal way of depicting a scoop some poetic license could be allowed, since: The notation for scoops and fall-offs ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible