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5

Medieval German notation for modal music (for all instruments and voices, not just for fretted stringed instruments) was essentially tablature, but using letter names for the notes instead of fret numbers as in modern tab notation. In early modal music, the only "altered" notes were B flat and B natural, which were written using different "square" and "round"...


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•Does this "swing rule" apply to 3/16 rests + 1/16 notes as well as 3/16 notes + 1/16 notes, even though only the latter is shown in the example notation next to the tempo? (I thought yes) Yes, it applies to any combination of notes and rests. •What is the real, correct name of this "swing rule" (so we can Google it)? No idea, but this notation ...


3

Your interpretation is correct. The triplets would not change the general swing feel with the 16th notes. It is just a notational convention. Here are some references for further study: Music Theory - Swing Swing (Jazz Performance Style)


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I assume you mean the numbers after the notes? In this case, the numbers are what are called an "octave designation." C4 is middle C, C5 is an octave above that, etc. So the D4 on the top left of that image is the lowest D that this flute can play. Otherwise, I'm not sure how effective a website will be in teaching you to play the Xiao flute. Something as ...


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I'm used to seeing this for chord fingering: Image source In case it's not clear, as spacing requires, sometimes the numbers are above the staff rather than below, but they are always arranged vertically and corresponding to the notes of the chord. I.e., the bottom of the three numbers is the finger to use for the lowest note of the chord, etc.


1

I'm not a violist, but I'm thoroughly confused by your fingering. There's only one way to play this chord, and I can't see how "3-3-1" describes it. At any rate, since there's only one way to play this chord, there's no need to mark a fingering at all.


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A bit of guesswork. Yes, the 'x' means play the string shown, whilst holding down the chord shown. The 'o' probably means play that string with no fingers on - open. The 'y' is most likely a quaver rest sign, meaning play nothing for that moment.The '--->' on the chord window will be a barre. Haven't a clue what the numbers under the staff are for, though....


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The signs are different forms of the letter B, which were needed as the different hexachords had different types of B's (namely, B flat and B natural). There isn't much more to say, Wikipedia has all you need. The letter B: Archaic forms of 'b', the b quadratum (square b, ♮) and b rotundum (round b, ♭) are used in musical notation as the symbols for ...



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