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23

They are actually eighth note triplets instead of eighth notes. The alternative notation to this would be to group the eighth notes and rests in threes and put a 3 over them like a standard triplet, but it's easy enough to see that you are fitting 12 equally spaced notes in a measure which end up being eighth note triplets which would kind of screw up the ...


19

The eighth notes in the left hand are all triplets. The ones in the right hand are normal. Note how the note heads line up vertically in measure 4. On a purely technical level, this is incorrect notation. But it's something that can be figured out pretty easily, so I guess Liszt either didn't care or wrote it like that for artistic reasons.


12

In support of the other answers here, I have re-notated this passage in your example to emphasize the triplets. This is the exact same passage of music (unless I have made a typo or two) but using extra symbols to make it more explicit. Note that in measure 4 you are required to play "two against three": your right hand is in a duple rhythm while your left ...


10

History. For centuries people just sang, and then somebody came up with a method of writing it down. Our system comes from the Western tradition. In the medieval period, most Western song was in the minor mode. The major key hadn't come into widespread usage. So the first scale they wrote down started with the note "A" and spelled out the A minor scale. ...


6

Marking the score 3/4 for 3 measures and then 4/4 for one, seems to fit nicely. Another thing you could try, is to mark the 4th measure as 12/8 (which works with 4 groups of 3 eighths each). Personally, I think I would choose the first option, 4/4.


4

A bit more information is needed. In the 4/4 bar, are the quarter notes the same length as in the 3/4 bars? In other words, is the quarter note constant (thus yielding 13 total pulses) or is each bar to be the same length (the quarters in the last bar are only 3/4 the duration as in the other bars.) Both of these are legitimate possibilities. If the quarter ...


3

Actually, normal practice is to omit the first ending measures from the count and number the second ending measures. If the bar number of the first bar of the first ending would normally be, say, m.31, the first bar of the second ending is m.31. If you need to refer to these two measures separately, you would refer to them as m.31 and m.31 bis (or m.31b) ...


2

There's not One True Way to do it. There are a few different methods that make sense in different contexts. In musical theater, every measure gets its own unique measure number so that places in the music can be unambiguously referred to by everyone. (In fact, this idea is so important that if music is added or removed, the measure numbers stay where they ...


2

I suggest the same direction as @ToddWilcox. But why not take it further and use Erik Satie as a model for humorous direction or narrative in a score? See this example in Sonatine Bureaucratique http://imslp.org/wiki/File:Sonatine.pdf This text is not performance direction, but is makes clear Satie's humorous intentions. The important point is don't worry ...


2

Those are "laissez-vibrer" ties: you just let the notes ring on. Comparing the top occurence of this construct with the following one makes it likely that the excess ties without proper reference may be a printing error and should instead be attached to the last three notes of the top voice. The next occurences show a second voice with explicitly prolonged ...


1

We base most of our notation off of C. Let's put this in the context of the piano. The first scale you learn would be C and most of the first songs you would play would be in C. In terms of keys, C is made of all the natural letter named notes so it makes sense to base the notation off this especially when it comes to notation.


1

I have no idea what "cut." would be an abbreviation for but "S.D." most likely means "snare drum". See this very similar question: What does Opt. S.D. mean?


1

I can only imagine that the sign is like D$, (del segno) which means go to the place where $ is shown, and play from there. Sometimes it's just DS with the $ at the beginning of where to go next. A pic would help.


1

I would hold a slightly different opinion to those already given and say the proper notation is 12 in the time of eight which is played the same as four triplets but still this is 12 in the time of eight. The person that did the transcription probably felt the marking for twelve in the time of 8 would be to hard and left you to scratch you head instead.


1

I just received Exploring Latin Piano by Tim Richards today. It's worth note for this discussion that the book uses an alternative measure numbering scheme which skips numbering for introductions and numbers measures after repeat signs as if the repeated measures had been written. (with a repeat at m.4 the next measure will be numbered m.9 rather than m.5) ...


1

I'm quite certain it's a type of laissez vibrer. I would interpret it to mean that I should leave the whole current chord in the pedal. The placement of the ties is a little odd but comparing to the following lines you see that the same idea repeats. It also explains the missing rests: there should be no silence. The first rest is probably there to make it ...


1

This looks to me like the score was rendered in some piece of software that, due to some layout conflict, has failed to render some of the notes of the piece at all. It also looks like the score is off by an eighth note from proper alignment...this happens sometimes when writing a score in music layout software that treats music as a list of notes. It's ...



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