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51

NReilingh gave a good general-case answer. I'll give you a specific case just to demonstrate that the concept is useful. First consider a C major chord. C-E-G, right? Then you make it into a minor chord by flattening the third, to get C-E♭-G. So far, so good. Now, consider an A♭ major chord: it's spelled A♭-C-E♭. But what happens when ...


46

You are ignoring the dotted line with 8va written above the upper G-clef. This means that the notes written in this clef should be played an octave above the written notes. (This notation is called All'ottava and is sometimes used to avoid ledger lines.) When you do this there is no conflict between the notes in the red box.


27

There was a trick for these that I used all the time based on what the rests look like. The whole rest looks like a hole. The words sound the same so it's a good way to equate them. The half rest looks like a hat and since hat and half both start with the letter 'h' they go together. I like this trick a lot because it associates the rests more with ...


27

In the full score here http://imslp.org/wiki/30_Etudes_for_the_Double_Bass_(Simandl,_Franz) (top of page 29) there is no accidental on the C. The OP's image is apparently a different edition - the dynamic markings are also different. I call "typo", and/or "poor editing and proofreading".


25

Since you're looking for software to input a score that is still under construction, MuseScore (found at musescore.org) would be my go-to application. It's a GNU-licensed graphical score editor that has playback and range-checking abilities. In case you later want to engrave a finished score with LaTeX-like typographic quality, LilyPond is considered to be ...


23

Well, "Jingle Bells" ain't no Bach, but the same principles apply: if you have two voices hogging one key, you play in a manner doing justice to both. In this case, the left hand has a leading voice down, so you strike the key hard enough (and possibly with the tiniest of lead which you keep up for the rest of the left-hand phrase) to have it ...


23

Both are right, these marks are to denote the section you are playing and you don't play anything specifically for them. The proper name for these marks are rehearsal marks. In an sense you can look at them as practice checkpoints as they are typically where you would want to start playing if you needed more practice on that section instead of playing the ...


23

There is LilyPond which does what you are looking for. It was first released on 1996, but it still gets updates. LilyPond is a computer program and file format for music engraving. One of LilyPond's major goals is to produce scores that are engraved with traditional layout rules, reflecting the era when scores were engraved by hand. LilyPond ...


23

They are actually eighth note triplets instead of eighth notes. The alternative notation to this would be to group the eighth notes and rests in threes and put a 3 over them like a standard triplet, but it's easy enough to see that you are fitting 12 equally spaced notes in a measure which end up being eighth note triplets which would kind of screw up the ...


23

Math Alert! Also, I will be very much discussing what is theoretically possible, not necessarily what is convenient for the poor musician. The notation for musical rhythm is more or less equivalent to writing a fractional number in binary (e.g. using a radix point). Each note type represents a different place value. For example: Whole note = 1.02 Half ...


21

B and Cb are different notes. One is a kind of B and the other is a kind of C. Information about harmony is contained both in the note name and any accidental alterations to it — C to any kind of E is a third, and C to any kind of F is a fourth, and those intervals have different meanings, even if they sound "the same". And these pitches are only the same ...


20

In elementary school, I was taught to think of the rest like a raft in water. Since a half rest gets two beats, it's like a raft carrying two people - light enough to float on top of the water: The whole rest, on the other hand, gets four beats (in common time, anyway) and so it's like a raft carrying four people - enough weight such that it sinks down ...


19

This is definitely an error. I would stay away from whomever edited / published this music. Nothing is vertically aligned and the print quality is abhorrent.


19

The eighth notes in the left hand are all triplets. The ones in the right hand are normal. Note how the note heads line up vertically in measure 4. On a purely technical level, this is incorrect notation. But it's something that can be figured out pretty easily, so I guess Liszt either didn't care or wrote it like that for artistic reasons.


18

It means quite simply that the voice in question is moving between the clefs (and usually between the hands as well). In this case, the voice starting with G above middle C falls an octave to be continued in the left hand until it returns to G below middle C, then rises back up an octave to be played in the right hand. Edit: Here is the original score of ...


17

I can just barely see the "common time" symbol at the left of your image, which denotes 4/4. The 2x is followed by parentheses which encapsulate the last rhythmic figure in the bar. This figure is an alternate version of playing beat 4 (otherwise the bar would have five beats in it). This means, assuming there are repeats elsewhere in this excerpt, that the ...


15

Those letters are just section identification. They are not meant to indicate notes to play. You might use them in a rehearsal where someone says "Ok let's all play section C now".


15

It's still a fermata and is typically referred to as triangle fermata. It's shorter than a typical fermata, but holds the same idea of prolonging the note longer than the value written. There's another variant of the fermata referred to as a square fermata that you hold longer than a typical fermata. You can see them all in the Dolmetsch musical symbols ...


14

A whole-note (semibreve) rest hangs D-O-W-N from the line (four letters, so four beats). A half-note rest points U-P from the line (two letters, so two beats).


14

It's a simile. There are a few different types of similes and this one means "play the last notated measure again". So in this piece you will end up playing the measure before the simile marks 3 times, then play the next notated measure. It's pretty much a very shorthand way of saying "Play what you just played again".


14

There are 3 separate voices. Voice 1 is the high D-F#-A-G, voice 2 is the middle [eighth rest]-D-A-E-A, and voice 3 is the half notes.


14

It's an 11-tuplet. Like a triplet, but with 11 notes where there would otherwise be 8 (or some other power of 2).


13

In this particular quartet, the solid bar lines are being used for coordination, but the instruments themselves are following their own metres which are demarcated by the dotted bar lines: the music is polymetric. The beaming across the bar line confirms this interpretation. In the first example, the first violin is counting 4/8, 5/8, 3/8, 4/8; the 2nd ...


13

You retain the accidental. In this case, it is pretty unambiguous since the lead note is immediately preceding the note (baroque trills would even start with the upper note). If there is more of a distance to the preceding use of a changed pitch, one would lean towards adding a reminder accidental to the trill.


12

Yes it is possible to have a note that is part of a triplet and dotted for example: In this we're using quarter note triplets. Instead of having them all be 3 even quarter note triplets the first one is dotted and the second one is shortened giving us a triplet consisting of a dotted quarter note followed by an eigth note followed by a quarter note to ...


12

You need to think of that measure as if it were two instruments playing. The higher of the two is playing a dotted "Β" which lasts for 3 beats, while the lower voice is playing an "Ε" for 2 beats and a "D" for the third beat. It all works out exactly when you look at it that way.


12

There certainly are some limits on the chords you can expect a guitarist to be able to play. Apart from the trivial observation that you can't have more notes in the chord than the number of strings, you also have limitations caused by hand size and reach. For example, if you have a very low note on the lowest string in your chord (but not an open string), ...


12

Simple answer: yes and yes. The first note immediately after the G clef is G below middle C; the first note after the F clef is, as you say, C an octave below middle C.



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