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46

You are ignoring the dotted line with 8va written above the upper G-clef. This means that the notes written in this clef should be played an octave above the written notes. (This notation is called All'ottava and is sometimes used to avoid ledger lines.) When you do this there is no conflict between the notes in the red box.


28

These are called "cues" and they show you what other instruments are playing while you have rests. They are normally placed right before an entrance, particularly after a long section of not playing, so that you can be sure of when to come in. "Tromb. e Tuba" means that these notes are being played by the trombone and tuba. (The markings in this music are ...


27

There was a trick for these that I used all the time based on what the rests look like. The whole rest looks like a hole. The words sound the same so it's a good way to equate them. The half rest looks like a hat and since hat and half both start with the letter 'h' they go together. I like this trick a lot because it associates the rests more with ...


25

Since you're looking for software to input a score that is still under construction, MuseScore (found at musescore.org) would be my go-to application. It's a GNU-licensed graphical score editor that has playback and range-checking abilities. In case you later want to engrave a finished score with LaTeX-like typographic quality, LilyPond is considered to be ...


23

Both are right, these marks are to denote the section you are playing and you don't play anything specifically for them. The proper name for these marks are rehearsal marks. In an sense you can look at them as practice checkpoints as they are typically where you would want to start playing if you needed more practice on that section instead of playing the ...


23

There is LilyPond which does what you are looking for. It was first released on 1996, but it still gets updates. LilyPond is a computer program and file format for music engraving. One of LilyPond's major goals is to produce scores that are engraved with traditional layout rules, reflecting the era when scores were engraved by hand. LilyPond ...


22

Well, "Jingle Bells" ain't no Bach, but the same principles apply: if you have two voices hogging one key, you play in a manner doing justice to both. In this case, the left hand has a leading voice down, so you strike the key hard enough (and possibly with the tiniest of lead which you keep up for the rest of the left-hand phrase) to have it ...


22

They are actually eighth note triplets instead of eighth notes. The alternative notation to this would be to group the eighth notes and rests in threes and put a 3 over them like a standard triplet, but it's easy enough to see that you are fitting 12 equally spaced notes in a measure which end up being eighth note triplets which would kind of screw up the ...


20

In elementary school, I was taught to think of the rest like a raft in water. Since a half rest gets two beats, it's like a raft carrying two people - light enough to float on top of the water: The whole rest, on the other hand, gets four beats (in common time, anyway) and so it's like a raft carrying four people - enough weight such that it sinks down ...


19

This is definitely an error. I would stay away from whomever edited / published this music. Nothing is vertically aligned and the print quality is abhorrent.


19

The eighth notes in the left hand are all triplets. The ones in the right hand are normal. Note how the note heads line up vertically in measure 4. On a purely technical level, this is incorrect notation. But it's something that can be figured out pretty easily, so I guess Liszt either didn't care or wrote it like that for artistic reasons.


18

Standard music notation and Tablature (Tab) can both tell a guitarist what notes to play. But each can do certain things better than the other. Tablature is a common and increasingly popular form of music notation for stringed fretted instruments. It has the advantage of a very short learning curve and does not require extensive study to learn. It is ...


16

They're cue notes. Notice the "Tromb.e Tuba" below them, indicating that the trombones and tuba(s) are playing those. It's there to reassure you that you've counted the rests properly.


15

Those letters are just section identification. They are not meant to indicate notes to play. You might use them in a rehearsal where someone says "Ok let's all play section C now".


14

A whole-note (semibreve) rest hangs D-O-W-N from the line (four letters, so four beats). A half-note rest points U-P from the line (two letters, so two beats).


14

It's a simile. There are a few different types of similes and this one means "play the last notated measure again". So in this piece you will end up playing the measure before the simile marks 3 times, then play the next notated measure. It's pretty much a very shorthand way of saying "Play what you just played again".


14

There are 3 separate voices. Voice 1 is the high D-F#-A-G, voice 2 is the middle [eighth rest]-D-A-E-A, and voice 3 is the half notes.


14

It's an 11-tuplet. Like a triplet, but with 11 notes where there would otherwise be 8 (or some other power of 2).


13

In this particular quartet, the solid bar lines are being used for coordination, but the instruments themselves are following their own metres which are demarcated by the dotted bar lines: the music is polymetric. The beaming across the bar line confirms this interpretation. In the first example, the first violin is counting 4/8, 5/8, 3/8, 4/8; the 2nd ...


13

You retain the accidental. In this case, it is pretty unambiguous since the lead note is immediately preceding the note (baroque trills would even start with the upper note). If there is more of a distance to the preceding use of a changed pitch, one would lean towards adding a reminder accidental to the trill.


12

This means "approximately equal to". I found this with a quick Google search. Here is an example of a webpage confirming the meaning of this symbol. I must confess, I prefer to use "c.", the abbreviation for circa, in metronome markings. Here's an example: I've also seen the "wiggly" equal sign used in metronome marks. It's the top one at this webpage ...


12

Yes it is possible to have a note that is part of a triplet and dotted for example: In this we're using quarter note triplets. Instead of having them all be 3 even quarter note triplets the first one is dotted and the second one is shortened giving us a triplet consisting of a dotted quarter note followed by an eigth note followed by a quarter note to ...


12

You need to think of that measure as if it were two instruments playing. The higher of the two is playing a dotted "Β" which lasts for 3 beats, while the lower voice is playing an "Ε" for 2 beats and a "D" for the third beat. It all works out exactly when you look at it that way.


12

More about figured bass, in support of @KimFierens' answer: The figured bass numbers and symbols on your scores were written by the original composer in the Baroque era, before about 1775. That was the only system they used back then for identifying chords. Our modern system of chord names had not been invented yet. That is why they don't write out modern ...


12

There certainly are some limits on the chords you can expect a guitarist to be able to play. Apart from the trivial observation that you can't have more notes in the chord than the number of strings, you also have limitations caused by hand size and reach. For example, if you have a very low note on the lowest string in your chord (but not an open string), ...


12

In support of the other answers here, I have re-notated this passage in your example to emphasize the triplets. This is the exact same passage of music (unless I have made a typo or two) but using extra symbols to make it more explicit. Note that in measure 4 you are required to play "two against three": your right hand is in a duple rhythm while your left ...


11

This is a pretty strange measure of music, I will grant you that. I would have notated this differently, but it is playable if you can decipher it. The notes in the middle voice should be written as single eighth notes and tied eighth notes. "Staggering" the three syncopated notes in the middle voice by writing them as quarter notes is against the ...


11

The layout of the clefs and staves, the placement of the pitches on the staff, and all the other elements of music notation, are the way that they are because they have evolved to be that way as a result of many centuries of usage and refinement by all the musicians in the world. They are the best way to represent the notes. Also, the piano's sheet music is ...


11

Simple answer: yes and yes. The first note immediately after the G clef is G below middle C; the first note after the F clef is, as you say, C an octave below middle C.


10

These groups of multiple notes are called chords. It does in fact mean to play all the notes at the same time. The notes you pictured appear to be notation for piano. The two staffs pictured are the treble and bass staffs. The notes on the lower staff are played with the left hand and the upper staff notes are played with the right hand. And yes, ...



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