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1

Specific to performance, swing is a type of timing which some define as dividing each beat in to three pieces and then playing the first and third part of that division. However many would fault this definition, claiming that swing is a "feel" that is not precisely divided into three, or four, or two, but some vaguely specific timing where the beat is ...


0

I have several recordings of the Noels and don't remember anything special here. In the second bar (the piece starts with your given bars, doesn't it?) it is not striking to be the standard symbol for an unspecified ornamentation. I observe however, that both systems being in the treble clef, on a one-manual instrument the right hand has to give way to the ...


0

The style of a piece is entirely subjective, and the composer or editor can use any term they wish! There are, however, a set of common tempos that are also related to rhythm and style (that page lists some that are primarily related to "mood and character" rather than speed). For example, agitato is used to denote not only a hurried pace but actually ...


5

I found the below footnote in a transcription on IMSLP: It translates: I think that one could play the + sign, as a 'pinched' lower mordent. Where this is first notated, it applies to the sign above a single note in the right hand, however, there are further places where the same notation is used on chords, and below the notes, without further ...


2

I like to approach this kind of question from the perspective of a composer: considering I want to write for an instrument that does not traditionally use notation, but will be played presumably by someone who is familiar with it, how best can I communicate what I am looking for to this person? I definitely agree with Kevin that adapting existing notational ...


4

Check this out. Thumbing is the act of playing with one or both thumbs on the keyboard below the keyboard on which the rest of fingers are playing. This technique was developed in the late 19th century, and fell out of use after 1930. While at first an organist not used to this technique will only be able to use it to play isolated sustained ...


1

This page is useful http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_musical_symbols#Articulation_marks It says: Left-hand pizzicato or Stopped note A note on a stringed instrument where the string is plucked with the left hand (the hand that usually stops the strings) rather than bowed. On the horn, this accent indicates a "stopped note" (a note played ...


2

Since it's rhythm I would suggest adapting drum tab to your purpose. Something like: or: HH|x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-|| S|----o-------o---|| B|o-------o-------|| 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + Whatever you're most comfortable with. Just replace the "HH" and other voices with an abbreviation for whatever effect you want to notate.


3

Not really, the fingers should be all you need. For example, to notate the cross on a scale, indicating "1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5" suffices to indicate a thumb-under-3 cross. And since you can pretty safely assume that each finger in order is going to play each note, you can leave out everything except the crosses. For an ascending C major scale in the right hand, ...


0

I'm a little bit confused by your explanation. Is it supposed to be: 1 2 3 e + a (pattern A, takes 1 second) or 1 2 3 + 4 + (pattern B, takes 1 1/3 second) The two downstrums in a row involve a motion where you move back up over the strings but don't strike them, as you mentioned, so if you're counting every movement of your ...


1

At 180 bpm, this means that a metronome needs to be set at 180 and each click will represent one beat. Your rhythm pattern is (I hope) 1-2-3and -4and as in 2 crotchets(1/4) followed by 4 quavers (1/8) notes, or strums.If you count the 1,2,3,4 evenly, the 'and' will go between. The count is in time with the metronome. After that, your theory goes awry. There ...


2

Babu's answer contains the canonical answer, it is a double sharp used to sharpen a note that has already had a sharp applied. I can see how it is hard to find these things, when we see the symbol on the page what on earth would we type into a search engine? This is where visual lists of musical symbols come in useful. Wikipedia provides one such list of ...


3

There are a couple of ways to achieve this. If a whole section of music in a particular part is to be played an octave higher when repeated, simply use text. Something like "8va 2nd time" at the beginning of the passage you want an octave higher, is perfectly clear. You could use a dotted line to show the exact group of notes to be played an octave higher if ...


0

Put something like (2. 8va) over the start of the repeat. This kind of notation is pretty common. If the 1st repeat has a change from the material before, this is usually written as 8va (2. loco) Where "loco" does not mean to play a crazy repeat but merely one without 8va.


6

What you are looking for is anti-accents, also called ghost notes: (Image taken from the wikipedia.org page on "accents".) The left one is slightly softer than other notes, the one on the right is much softer, and the one in the middle is, well, right in the middle. Ghost notes are often notated with an x instead of a circle for the notehead.


15

Is this handwritten or printed? Is the notation of German origin? In German, the notes E flat and A flat are called Es and As.


4

Could it maybe be German (or Dutch)? Because in this case it would mean Eb and Ab (i.e. E flat and A flat). And in this case 'Es' would refer to an Eb major triad, and 'As' refers to an Ab major triad.


6

After doing a little bit of digging, I found a source* that uses the s instead of the full sus symbol to notate a suspended chord. They always put the number next to it, but a sus alone indicates a sus4 so I would imagine that they would be equivalent. I would still like to see the context just to be sure but I think it is pretty likely. * I don't really ...


7

I agree that it's probably a sus4 chord, but if it's hand-written, could the "s" possibly be a "5" and it's a power chord? Only other kind of far-out thought...


13

This will just be an embellishment of @user15077’s answer. This is the beginning of your piece as you’ve notated it: Here is what it would look like with a more standard approach: As you can see, many of the notes are expressed as tied notes now. For example, the quarter-note D-sharp in the first measure is written as a sixteenth tied to a dotted ...


9

Let's just pick the first bar apart which is pretty much a mess. I'll write down the note durations as fractions: 3/8 1/16 1/4 9/16 (bar line after 5/16 of that, the 5/16 written as 1/4~1/16). This does not look as much like "composing" as it looks like "let the notation program break the mess across bars and fix this up in the next measure". If this ...


2

A simple basic rule, not always followed, is that 4/4 bars can be split in the middle. It does make life easier for the people who have to read the dots, although good sight readers don't have a problem.We're not all GOOD sight readers, though... Shev's point about 4/4 is one that you need to address. In the early stages of writing, it's probably a good idea ...


0

I thought the beaming of eighth notes, sixteenth notes, ect. was to help show the beats in the current measure. Why are these notes beamed together across the barline? To help show the beats in the current measure. This kind of beaming is a very strong indicator that the barline is disconnected with the actual rhythmic grouping of the phrase beamed across ...


2

Sometimes, beaming is used to indicate logical groupings of notes. See fore example, the motivic analysis of the piece asked about in this question: Why is the bass clef indicated twice on the same line in this Bartok piece?


4

This kind of beaming often indicates that that very passage in Violin II has a displaced accent when compared to the other instruments: while they follow the time signature changes, from 2/4 to 3/4 and back to 3/4, the second violin keeps a metric accent likewise to 3/4 throughout all the selected excerpt. The beaming serves to guide the player through the ...


6

All simile marks basically say the same thing which is play what you just played. The only thing that typically changes from simile to simile is how much you play. With a single simile you would only play one note/chord, but the others take groups of notes or measures. The breakdown of all the similes in your post are as follows: Single - play last notated ...



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