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2

It's a very distinct and verbose way to name 7th chords that is derived from classic theory. I'm not sure if it has a name or even needs a name as there's always more then one way to name chords for example some people use Co7 to represent a fully diminished chord and some people use Cm6b5 to denote the same chord and call it that. I'll refer to it as 7th ...


1

I don't know if the major-minor thing has a name, but the idea is to dissociate the actual intervals from the tonal function. Calling a chord a "major minor seventh" is simply describing the chord without any context, and calling a chord a "dominant" chord is describing a relationship with the tonic. In the kind of Classical music that is typically used to ...


1

At a guess (given that the following note is an octave down and probably played with 5), play the two notes with the thumb, Dom, i.e., with thumb on the crack between the keys.


4

It's an indication that you are supposed to play the bracketed notes with a single finger. In this case—as is most common—you are supposed to play both notes of the second with your thumb instead of two fingers.


1

The whole POINT of a tritone is its ambiguity! But, in a system of harmonic analysis built on the "pile of thirds" model, I can see why a modified 5th is preferred to a modified 4th. I find insistence that the indisputably aurally flattened b10 must be labelled #9 rather harder to take!


1

Matt L.'s answer is an excellent one. If you are asking "what should I call it, and when should I call it that?" here's my experience. In heptatonic (7 note scales) each number gets used once, you always call it a #4 if its the fourth note in the scale, e.g. in Lydian, or for a minor example, in the 4th mode of harmonic minor (essentially Dorian with a ...


4

I think that in this (and most other) contexts the broad definition of the tritone makes sense, which says that a tritone is an interval spanned by six semi-tones. So with this definition both augmented fourth and diminished fifth qualify as a tritone. Whether that note in the blues scale is written as a #4 or a b5 usually depends on the direction of the ...


3

To be 100% exact to the name 'tritone', it would be #4. Because, if we ascend 3 tones from the root, we have #4, and not b5. The three tones would be C-D, D-E, E-F#. Although, from what I have understood, it depends on the progression. Usually, the #4/b5 tritone would descend a semitone. For instance, a common progression would be Gb7-F (maj7 or 7). Since ...


-1

I think Answer #1 is more complex than the question asked. The direct answer is that no, A# and Bb are not the exact same notes. Though they are close, A# is slightly higher in pitch than Bb. It is possible to play both of these notes at their correct frequencies on some instruments, such as a violin or a singing voice, because the player can control the ...


0

I play the French horn and we see this sort of thing all the time in our music. Many of the answers mention phrase markings, and I think that's a fitting term. I've always been told that it meant to play them legato, but tongue them. If you're playing in an ensemble, you might want to check with the other members to see how they are handling it.


0

In the Henle Urtext edition there is no tie on G# and nothing is said about it in the commentary. This suggests that there is no ambiguity: it should be repeated. Also the grace notes should be in the following bar which may or may not affect your interpretation. And the slur should start on the half note G#, there is no slur on the preceding 16th notes. But ...


5

This will be a G7b9 chord. Where the 9th is flattened from A to Ab. So, the whole chord has pitches G B D F Ab Although the "-" sign is sometimes used to denote a minor chord (a chord with a minor 3rd), it can also be used to denote a minor, flattened or diminished interval in a chord. For example -5 for b5, or in this case -9 for b9.


6

It must be a shorthand way of writing what's in the previous bar: instead of writing all three triplets out, he's written one, with the '3' over it, saying it gets played thrice. As each chord needs to be staccato, he's put three dots over it, to signify each staccato.


3

As Laurence Payne's comment says, you've encountered one form of musical shorthand. There are a few layers of shorthand here so I'll break it down for you. Stripping the first of the first measure of the second line of any shorthand markings, we have just a dotted eighth note. Now we'll look at that slashy mark across the stem. It just means to subdivide ...


10

Without a picture, we can just guess, and my guess is that it is referring to a triplet. Something like this for instance: Τhe eighth triplets (second group,second bar) are 3 eighth notes that are being played in one beat; the quarter triplets (first group,second bar) are 3 quarter notes that are being played on two beats etc.


4

It's just to let you know the when building the chord you don't use the 5th that is natural to the key, but a lowered one instead. Remember every figured bass marking assumes you are building your harmony inside the key you are in and in this case you are not. So the figured base is referring to Eb instead of E as that is what a standard 5 would represent. ...


1

It refers to an interval of a fifth. The b is for you to know that the note should be flat by the key signature. Don't think these symbols as chord symbols. Think of them as intervals regardless of quality (i.e. major, minor, perfect etc.) from the bass note. If an accidental is required it will be given as in your case. The same goes for every other ...


1

Common standard string tablature can be called 'Fret tablature' If you are going to be writing tablature for yourself, you might as well go an ergonomic step further, and use 'Fingering tablature' instead. It has two advantages - it is faster to interpret, and it informs you where your hand should be placed on the neck. Consider a piece of fret tablature ...


1

A common misconception is that accidentals affect future notes in the same measure across octaves. This is simply not true. Accidentals only affect the note in the octave in which they occur. So, if A4 has a sharp accidental and there is an A3 later in the same measure, the sharp doesn't carry over. This happens often in jazz music, as well as in ...


1

In conjunction with the slur and the rit., it means bring out the right hand figure slightly. The slur already specifies that the figure is to be played legato and as a group (which means that the last crochet should probably be slightly detached from whatever follows it, although it will be held reasonably long anyway due to the rit.). From an interpretive ...


2

Rit is probably ritenuto, an immediate slowing down, as opposed to rubato, and tenuto means hang on for full note value - or even a touch longer: which makes sense as one will make the other happen.So, the whole bar should come at a slightly slower pace than the preceding bars. On the assumption it's written in C at that point - I'm guessing - you can play ...


7

There are two unrelated things going on here, and I'm not sure which you're asking about. The small bit of staff with the tiny notes on it is called an ossia. It goes with the staff below it, and gives you an alternative way to play that passage. In this case, the difference looks to be the location of the accented notes (marked with the > symbol), although ...


0

In principle key signatures apply to all octaves, while individual accidentals apply only to the octave, where they appear. Sometimes score editors are helpful by repeating individual accidentals (courtesy or cautionary accidentals); if these are not especially marked (smaller print, parentheses) it makes the rule more diffcult to recognize for the ...


2

Most scales are assumed to be octave-repeating, due to the way that we hear a similarity between notes that are an octave apart (the reason for this being that with many instruments, any note contains harmonic partials at the frequencies of all the overtones of a note an octave below). This includes the diatonic scale, which is the scale that standard ...


5

Accidentals in a key signature always apply to any octave you play in. The human ear hears the same note in neighbouring octaves as almost identical (in fact, many people have a hard time distinguishing them at all). People sing along to a tune in a higher or lower octave with no qualms, and often without noticing. Some instruments, e.g. kettle drums, emit ...


0

Great question! I also wondered about this for a while. Each note in a scale should have a different letter name. For example, the D major scale doesn't have the same letter twice: D E F# G A B C# D If the scale had flats instead of sharps, G and D would be used twice and F and C would not be used at all: D E Gb G A B Db D Double flats/sharps were ...



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