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1

Take a look at this demo. (Use 'View Page Source' in your browser to look at the code). http://saebekassebil.github.io/teoria/ As a javascript library intended for use in the browser, there would be a bit of work to do to couple it up with pure audio, but I'm sure there are APIs and libraries around that would help. It is certainly fast enough for real ...


2

There are two different types of tremolo indicated in your example. The first bar, where the tremolo lines are placed between notes, requires the rapid reiterations (here, in 32'nd notes) of the alternating notes indicated. The first tremolo requires that we alternate between middle C and its octave (higher) in 32'nd notes for half a measure. The second ...


6

These two bars don't denote the same thing. The first asks the player to alternate the two notes. The second asks the player to repeat the two-note chords.


0

At the start of every measure, no matter the time signature beat one typically gets a stronger accent than the rest of the notes and any musician either consciously or subconsciously will do this. Every beat will have some kind of accent based on the time signature and this can be extended in certain time signatures like 4/4 and 6/8 where there is a second ...


3

Yes, indeed. The time signature together with an understanding of the musical style of the period in which the music was written tell you what the rhythm is and what the accents are supposed to be in general. Specific notes in specific measures might be written in such a way as to over-ride the default pattern. For example, in classical music in general, in ...


0

A time signature implies a structure of the music, just like spaces in a written sentence imply a structuring into words. When reading a sentence, you don't make an explicit pause after each word, yet the word structure is related to the conveyed meaning, and somebody reading a written text does it subtly different from somebody reading a continuous ...


0

No. Accents can be on each on the crotchet beats like you mention. It can be on the weak part of the pulse (Syncopation) There can be no accents. The accent can be on certain quavers. None of which has all that much to do with the time signature. There is no concrete place where a accent must be. There are places where an accent would be natural and places ...


5

There are oodles of tab-reading tutorials out there so I'll keep this basic (just google-search "how to read guitar tabs"). The "lowest" string on the paper is your "lowest" string pitchwise (your low-E) but the "highest" string physically (closest to you). Each number represents the fret number to hold down and play. We move from left to right and play ...


1

In keeping with the melodic and rhythmic elements Chopin is working with, his intention is to flatten the sixth degree of Eb (key) - i.e., the C. This happens to be the enharmonic equivalent of B. Regardless, his intentions lead him to write Cb. This is an idiosyncratic feature of the key of Eb. Flattening the sixth of other major scales does not lead to ...


1

I haven't checked the sheet music, but in any case, a Cb is enharmonically the same as a B natural. As is always the case, the flat just lowers the note by a semi-tone.


2

Well, it wouldn't make sense otherwise, would it? It can't be a tie since those are only between two adjacent noteheads (which need to have the same pitch and would not be used to connect two eighth notes when the first is on the beat: you'd just write a quarter), so one wants to hear four notes. Which is what your fellows produced. Now the question is ...


1

It turns out that the closest approximation to this articulation is a scoop. Many thanks to @MatthewRead for pointing me to the glissando family where I found the scoop (and also the plop, doit and fall) articulation. While this is not the normal way of depicting a scoop some poetic license could be allowed, since: The notation for scoops and fall-offs ...


4

There is a notation form I have come across called Sagittal notation. It seems pretty comprehensive for microtonic notation. The Sagittal notation system is a comprehensive system for notating musical pitch in all possible scales and tunings - a universal set of microtonal accidentals, equally suited to extended just intonation, equal divisions of the ...


0

I'd just like to emphasise (for those that are still confused by this layout) just how the voices work and interleave with each other. Following is the bar re-created with MuseScore with each of the voices in a different colour - Blue (primary), Green (Secondary) and Gold (Tertiary). The same colours are duplicated in the guitar tabulature to emphasise how ...


2

To answer the second question, you can use the "voices" feature of GP6 : You can have 4 voices. Each voice has it's own "bar duration count" which is independent from the other. To change the current voice, use the "1", "2", "3" and "4" buttons. When you'll add a note, it will be added to the currently selected voice. The notes from the other voices are ...


0

Instead of thinking of dots as being additive, think of dotted notes as being short of the next longest duration. A quarter note is one quarter note short of a half note A dotted quarter is one eighth note short of a half note A double-dotted quarter is one sixteenth note short of a half note A triple-dotted quarter is one 32nd note short of a half note ...


11

This is a pretty strange measure of music, I will grant you that. I would have notated this differently, but it is playable if you can decipher it. The notes in the middle voice should be written as single eighth notes and tied eighth notes. "Staggering" the three syncopated notes in the middle voice by writing them as quarter notes is against the ...


14

There are 3 separate voices. Voice 1 is the high D-F#-A-G, voice 2 is the middle [eighth rest]-D-A-E-A, and voice 3 is the half notes.


1

Adding to Dom's excellent answer, the tails on the dots are the clue. There's one set of notes with up tails, and one with down tails. Showing two parts to the line. Trouble is, it's a compromise, as it looks like the first note in the bar could be a minim with a tail AND a beam. Of course, this sort of note doesn't get used. It's written like that (and has ...


2

As Patrx2 notes, JP did not indicate a tempo. There are reasons that suggest that this piece was played at a moderately fast tempo at the time it was written - say 100-120 BPM, where a beat in this case is a quarter note. However, when played on strings (violins and bass), modern tastes place this piece firmly in a lento (slow) tempo; say 56-64 BPM. ...


5

Slow it down then. Pachelbel's manuscript has no tempo affixed. With the basso ostinato suggesting a fairly deliberate pace, try somewhere between 72-92 bpm. If the shorter notes start blurring, slow the tempo down a bit; if they are dragging a bit, speed it up. In general, the tempi specified for a given piece (when specified) are suggestions anyway. ...


9

It's an octave clef. It's telling you all the notes written are actually down an octave. Since the guitar is already a transposing instrument where everything is transposed down an octave, it's essentially showing you the actual notes being played instead of the implied octave transposition. So for simplicity's sake you can just ignore it and play as you ...


8

Dots in general start to get messy after the first one and can lead to confusion to while sight reading if more than one is used. For the sake of sight reading there are even some syncopated lines where a normal duration like a quarter note or eighth note are represented as ties to show the beat better. Using more than one dot is more theoretical in ...


0

In fingerstyle, I often use this with nylon strings and so far (over twelve years of guitar study) I have not seen a notation for it. Thus, I set a figure, double vertical thick line, to use in my sheets and named it as chord-flood. Because feeling of it reminds me flood.


2

Chord symbols are very explicit in telling you what chord you are playing. A C#7 is a C# dominant 7th spelled C#, E#, G#, B. Any chord with a note and a 7 is a dominant 7th. Here's a simple breakdown of chords based on chord symbols. To keep this general, we'll use C as an example, but this is for any root note: Triads C = C major = root, major 3rd, ...


2

These time signatures are very interesting in nature and have a very specific purpose just like most things in music. A measure of (3/5)/4 would mean each measure contains 3/5 of a quarter note or 3 eighth note quintuplets. A simpler example is 2(1/2)/4 where where would be 2 and a half quarter notes or 5 eighth notes. As Matthew Read pointed out in the ...


0

I'm going to make a literal and mathematical assessment here, not because I'm not sure how to interpret why someone would write that way but because I really don't think it matters HOW it's written. It matters how the piece is heard, not about some strange writing on a page. So if I play in 3/4 time, that has a waltz feel, and if I play in 4/4 time, that ...


7

I'm guessing that tied notes have rather taken over. They're easier to read - were there two or three dots?- and the grouping probably is easier to follow. Let's face it, it's simpler to read a crotchet tied to a shorter note than do the sums to work out how long the (double) dotted note needs to be.


4

A curved line connected two notes that are the same pitch is a tie. If they are different pitches, it is a slur. In this example, the C sharps in the bottom voices in the right hand are tied, and the other voices are played legato according to the slurs.


1

Phrasing is something that cannot be precisely quantified. It can only be described by words like "legato" and "tenuto" and "staccato" I tell my students to remember this: The music does not exist on the sheet of paper. The written sheet music is a detailed encoded message to help the musician figure out how to perform the music. The musician has to decode ...


0

Your calculation is correct. I understand it can be a bit confusing. The best way to think of this is that the quarter note is sort of a unit, like gram or meter. We use it to be able to express how may 'units' we need to fill up a measure. In 4/4 it's four, in 3/4 it's three. (Another often used 'unit' is the eighth note, in 6/8 for example). The quarter ...


6

There is no default. In the absence of markings, it's up to you to figure this out, just as you would have to figure out dynamics or fingering if those are left out. For example, take a typical lead sheet for "How High the Moon": http://www.realbooksite.com/jazz-sheet-music-images/Jazz-Sheet-Music-Page-202.jpg, which leaves this out (ties are indicated as ...


3

To an extent, it's instrument dependent. On a piano, most 'ordinary' notes will be played legato by default. On wind instruments, each note may well be played using a separate breath/tongue. On strings it's different again. Bowing will make a difference in phrasing, so will need to be written. On guitar, a slur will indicate that the following note/s will ...


0

Legato is not just about the length of notes. When you play legato, you are trying to transition through the notes smoothly. This means you will also see a change in note velocity, volume and phrasing. The difference is very instrument dependent. On a guitar, for example, you would try not to pick all the notes in a slurred series of notes, as the picking ...


-4

I see numbers 1,2,4 there. Maybe this is written for four singers, where 1 and 2 sing and 4 sings I don't know what happend to singer 3. Maybe she is silent here. Or maybe her part is on the other staff that we don't see in the OP.


0

If you really need the playback to be like you ask, you could use repetition and alternate endings. It will work "playback-wise" but I doubt this is a proper use of that in music notation. But I think this does what you want :


9

Dave is right, but there's a little more to it. You can break the part up into two different lines. One that looks like this: And another that looks like this: When you put them together, you get the two part represented by different stems. It's pretty much telling you to hold the first note for the length of a quarter note, but play the set of notes ...


5

There are two voices in this music: the lower plays f, then e as quarter notes; Note that the downward pointing stem's don't have flags/beams -- thus they are quarter notes. the upper plays f <a d> e <g c#> as eighth notes This is the way to write music where more than one voice happen to execute the same note at the same time. If you ...


1

By what you explain, it sounds like you want to repeat a section 3 times. You don't need to use a Coda and Segno because a closing repet can be used more than twice as seen in the Guitar Pro manual: Repeat close This symbol replaces a closing bar-line, and sends you back to the last Repeat open sign. A dialog window will open up for you to ...


3

The symbol over the note (which can also be below a note, upside down) is called a fermata and nowadays it has become a standard indication of a pause*. Meaning that the duration of the note or a rest associated with the fermata will be longer than it's supposed to be. say for example, if it's above a quarter note then the duration of the quarter note could ...


0

Fermata it mans pause. That last note should be slightly held.


2

That's a fermata, indicating to rest on this note longer than its nominal value.


0

From the way you worded your question, it sounds like you might not be completely clear on the concept of dotted notes vs. tied notes. A dot after a note means the rhythmic value of the note is increased by 1/2 of the value of the note. For example, a dotted half note lasts for 3 beats. A tie between two notes means that they are played as one note with ...


5

It's called measured tremolo, and is a shorthand for writing a series of eighth notes. It means that you are to play repeated eighth notes that fill the time of the half note. So, for example, in the first measure, you'd play four eighth notes of A, followed by four eighth notes of G♯.


1

This depends in large part whether we're talking about "fixed do" or "movable do" solfege, so I'll answer from each perspective: Movable Do In movable-do solfege, the syllables mark the scale degree rather than the absolute pitch of the note, so the syllables used will vary depending on the key in which the chord appears. In practice, diminished seventh ...


3

Note: For the sake of discussion, I'm limiting myself here to equal temperaments, which is the most common way of tuning keyboards. Other systems exist, of course, but would probably only confuse the matter. Why do B and C and E and F not have a sharp note between them? Simply because, acoustically speaking, there is no room in our current system for ...


1

The simple answer is that the layout of the piano keyboard is the most useful and efficient possible for playing in equal temperament. If you want to play music in all 12 Major and all 12 Minor keys, this is the keyboard you need. As another answer has observed, our notation system is centered on the key of C Major, so it is only natural that the keyboard ...


1

There are some ambiguities in the way your question is stated. It is difficult to interpreted it in a non-arbitrary way; if you suggest adding one key for E# in addition to the present F key why not suggest for example the addition of two keys for B-flat and A-sharp respectively? And if you suggest reinterpreting E# as the quarter-tone between E and F, why ...



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