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3

Note: For the sake of discussion, I'm limiting myself here to equal temperaments, which is the most common way of tuning keyboards. Other systems exist, of course, but would probably only confuse the matter. Why do B and C and E and F not have a sharp note between them? Simply because, acoustically speaking, there is no room in our current system for ...


1

The simple answer is that the layout of the piano keyboard is the most useful and efficient possible for playing in equal temperament. If you want to play music in all 12 Major and all 12 Minor keys, this is the keyboard you need. As another answer has observed, our notation system is centered on the key of C Major, so it is only natural that the keyboard ...


1

There are some ambiguities in the way your question is stated. It is difficult to interpreted it in a non-arbitrary way; if you suggest adding one key for E# in addition to the present F key why not suggest for example the addition of two keys for B-flat and A-sharp respectively? And if you suggest reinterpreting E# as the quarter-tone between E and F, why ...


2

If you are talking about microtonality - of which I know little, there will have to be a lot more than just changes to E/F and B/C. It's possible to have notes between any adjacent semitones. There could be as many extra notes between G and G# as between E and F. It just happens that it's accepted (and has been for centuries) that the note called F is ...


6

In your score, if you count the tied notes as a unit (which you should) adds up to 9 notes and there are 9 notes in the original part. Count the notes between the circles as one. The original score is trying to collect all these values into one. The way your score turned out is correct and much more simplified. I doubt you'll come across the first one ...


0

Judging from the linked question, such confusion probably involves situation when a slur only involves 2 notes, and those 2 notes are equal. Thus question arises: whether such slur is equivalent to a tie. The answer is absolutely no. There would be ways for performer to tell their difference, even when composer doesn't explicitly notate as such. Using ...


1

Doubles are covered here. Purpose of double-sharps and double-flats? Essentially they occur in sheet music as a way of "spelling" notes. For a piece of music that has a flat or sharp in the key signature already, if you want to raise or lower that now within the music you then need a double. If G that at some point included a minor third accidental (a ...


1

A time signature seems unnecessary for what you're describing, unless "moving a note" would invoke "moving all similar notes" where similar means the same note at the same spot in a measure: the concept of measure would require a time signature. If you don't need that concept then you don't need the associated time signature. For tempo... same thing: do you ...


0

Ties are ALWAYS between notes at the same pitch. Either because there is no one note that will portray the length or because the long note is longer than the bar length for the piece. Slurs are ALWAYS between notes of different pitch - two, three or more may feature. A slur could be construed as a mini-phrase, where all the notes included in the slur are ...


2

Ties change ONLY the RHYTHM value: notes which cannot be represented only by one symbol, must be tied. Ties can be only between two tones of the same pitch. Slurs is an EXPRESSION: it indicates that a phrase should be played smoothly. It can connect two or more tones.


0

This largely depends on the context of what is being written, but I would say the answer is you would always have to provide some kind of distinction between them if it would be more simple to simply write a longer duration note. Performers can usually determine what is being intended by what isn't written as well. If a composer truly wants a sustained ...


6

Two tied notes on a percussive instrument (including piano) have a single attack. Two slurred notes are two strikes without dampening the first strike before placing the second between. Two tied notes on a string instrument are a single note and thus are played on the same string. In contrast, two slurred notes may well occur on different strings when ...


7

That is a trill, not a mordent. It actually starts on the upper auxiliary. The table below is from the Clavier-Büchlein vor Wilhelm Friedemann Bach, i.e., it is Bach's own. You can read more about it here. This a duplicate of this question.


0

Tied notes are, by definition, the same note carried across a bar line. When the second note is different, even though it may be the same letter name, but altered with a #, b or natural, then that note will have to be played as a separate note in the new bar. Then, the 'tie' line becomes a slur. Yes, if it's the same note, there's no need to put the # in ...


9

An accidental does apply across the bar line, but would need to be reapplied to any applicable notes after the second note under the tie. Ties don't apply to different notes. (You'd use a slur instead if you wanted the 1st note held until the 2nd note is attacked.) If, say, you sharp a G and tie it across the bar line, then follow the second note under the ...


0

I am the developer of Chordastic, I think this is the software you are looking for. It can produce really nice lyrics and chord sheets with minimum effort and with very easy UI.


3

As Wheat Williams indicated, context is everything. Oscillating between E and E-flat is notationally awkward. In the absence of other compelling influences, I would notate this as D-sharp. Similarly, Oscillating between D and D-sharp is awkward; in that context I would notate as E-flat. In the context of a major or minor scale, you should notate in a ...


2

It depends on the specific scale you are talking about. If the note is not a member of this scale, things become difficult: one would have to decide according to the function it has in a given piece of music, whether it is a flattened or sharpened one. Without any additional information one choice is as good as the other. Your given scale seems close to ...


1

Certainly Eb is more 'common' than D#. Eb comes as the second changed flat, whereas D# is the 4th. It depends a lot on the key the piece is in. If it's a sharp key, then that note usually gets called D#. If it's a flat key, it's Eb. However, it also depends on what note it changed from. Say a tune is in A major, and it modulates into E for a bar or few, ...


9

This is actually a really nice way to notate guitar. The chord symbol on top tells you what chord to play for the bar, and the tab itself is just indicating the arpeggio pattern. So for example, in the first full bar, you finger a x32010 C major chord, then play the strings indicated as eighth notes (which are indicated by the eighth note beams). Then ...


3

I'd read it like this: Make the chord like the first line says. Then the x's tell you which string to play, starting from the 6th string in the bottom to the 1st in the top. The bars uniting the notes are to give you the tempo of these notes. The numbers on the top of the bars are a mistery to me.


2

A very common issue; this occurs a lot in the works of Mendelssohn as well. Some professional pianists seem to ignore the composers' pedal marks in passages like these, and some observe them. It seems like in these cases the composer was thinking of an orchestral analogue, so in the RH of that piece it looks like the phrase marking he would have written for ...


1

It's true that a crotchet is though of as a 1/4 note - taken from a 'whole note' being a semibreve (worth 4 crotchets). However, the word semibreve comes from half a breve, which actually intimates that a whole note SHOULD be worth 8 crotchets - or - a crotchet OUGHT to be a 1/8 note...


2

A quarter note is called that because it is always a quarter the duration of a whole note. This true regardless of the time signature, tempo, or number of beats in a bar. You will notice that in 3/4, a whole note does not fit into a measure.


1

Repeating what everyone else said: that symbol means repeat the last bar. Periodically, there are also ones that mean repeat the last two (or however many) bars. I don't remember off the top of my head what made that one look different, it was very similar, but I believe there was a number printed that helped with that conclusion. They can't just put in ...


5

The beam fragments drawn through stems mean that each of the 8th notes should be divided into two 16th notes. This has nothing to do with the 5/8 time, it's simply a shorthand notation to save writing a lot of note heads, particularly for dense tremolos.


4

It is short-hand for "play this measure the same way you played the previous measure". Sometimes it is called the "repeat bar" symbol. It is not particular to music notation for bass. It is frequently found, for instance, in fake-book charts and in notation for the "rhythm section" in jazz, meaning percussion, bass, piano and guitar (with guitar, ...


14

It's a simile. There are a few different types of similes and this one means "play the last notated measure again". So in this piece you will end up playing the measure before the simile marks 3 times, then play the next notated measure. It's pretty much a very shorthand way of saying "Play what you just played again".


2

Rap verses can be conveniently notated in the usual way. Proof (you might want to right-click and zoom in):


0

I know little about rap. But just from pure logic and having played music... There are only 2 musical notation systems - standard notation and piano roll notation. There's no melody involved in most rap (which I just don't get, but that's beside the point). Either system will work perfectly well. Rap is just music. Use whatever music notation you like. ...


2

The other answers are using terminology which common, but confusing. I think it's better to realize there are two different things here. A whole-bar rest. This is always the same symbol whatever the length of the bar, and it is always positioned horizontally in the middle of the bar. A whole-note rest. This has the same length as a whole-note. and is ...


3

You can't really talk about metric modulation without discussing Elliot Carter, a master metric modulator (say that three times fast!) I agree that the passage discussed in the clip is a hemiola, but not for the discussed reasons. Much like a tonal modulation, metric modulations are only considered so if you stay where you're going. For example, if John ...


2

This is what I have been taught in High school and university: Theoretically, you can say that G11 is the chord with the notes G, B, D, F, A and C. But in practice, the third (in this case B) should be omitted, because of the dissonance! The 5th (the note D in G11) may be omitted, but not necessarily. So in practice G11 is the same as G9sus4. This is also ...


3

If I'm understanding correctly, you want to tell people that the speed is reducing to to 0.75 of what it was, though in this piece, I feel more of a hemiola (cross rhythm) effect than an actual modulation. The way to notate tempo modulations is to use either the beat or the largest division or subdivision of the beat that is as simple as possible. In this ...


1

I'm not going to answer your first or last question because I believe they are answered in the question you linked. By this logic, I'm assuming that if if I pluck the next 'A', (ie: fifth string, 12th fret), the frequency of the sound generated would be 220Hz. Does this make sense? Yes, this is correct. To get from one A to the next A up, you ...


4

You're right to be confused, this is notated incorrectly. My best guess is that there's a second voice, so really there should be a quarter and eighth rest before those notes (below the existing quarter notes) and a half rest afterward, and whoever wrote this went through the extra effort to disable them from the display. They could also be grace notes, ...


2

This doesn't seem correct, but it could be: The F on the 2nd beat was a eighth instead of a quarter The F on the 2nd beat was a sixteenth and the second sixteenth F note was a eighth (not really likely) The two sixteenth Fs were grace notes. I believe the most likely answer is the third one. Like they are supposed to be played on (or before) the 3rd ...


2

Semibreve (whole note) rests are always used as measure rests, except occasionally for time signatures like 4/2, where a breve rest might be used instead. It's actually pretty simple: you know how many beats are in a given measure, so getting finicky about the actual time interval is a bit of a waste of energy when that voice isn't playing anything anyway. ...


1

This is a very common misconception due to how the notes are named. All notes take up a very specific length of a measure as defined by the time signature. In the most common time signature 4/4, which is also refereed to as common time, a whole note and rest both take the value of 4 quarter notes so it takes up the whole measure in 4/4. The half note and ...


1

A full gentleman takes his hat off to greet a lady (full rest looks like an upside down hat), but a half gentleman leaves his hat on his head (half rest looks like a riteside up hat). Credit for this goes to my second grade music teacher who I can remember only as Large, with a blond ponytail to her waist and drawing music notation on the chalkboard.


3

No, there's not a conventional rest you can use for that. But you have a couple of options here, depending on what effect is intended. Remember to always go with the simplest solution that accurately represents your intention. Staccato: In this case (and many others), a simple staccato over an eighth note will make this far more legible, especially for ...


6

Be explicit about it. Time signatures can change rapidly in modern music, so we need to see all beats accounted for. If I'm reading a piece by Mozart and the end of the bar is empty, I'd feel okay about just assuming the rests, but if I'm playing Stravinsky and I see a measure with the wrong number of beats, I don't know what the hell is going on. There ...


3

In the case of the example, the readability might be improved by using a doubly-dotted quarter rest instead of the sixteenth, eighth and quarter rests. Technically, all the rests in the measure could be replaced by a triply-dotted half rest, but I can't recall ever seeing that in print.


0

I used to think of it this way: If I lie in a bed, I can get rested quickly. If I try to sleep while hanging from a rope, it will take a lot longer to "rest". I actually like some of the other answers given better (DOWN=4, UP=2 - but since I didn't grow up with English as my first language, that was not available to 5 year old me) - but you never now ...


1

I was taught: Semibreve = Spider. Hangs from a line. Minim = Mouse. Runs along a line.


0

The book Usborne First Book of the Keyboard is full of memorable cartoons for remembering this kind of stuff. The cartoon for remembering rests has two figures: The first figure is lazy and sits on top of the line, so he's a half rest. The second figure is strong and can hang below the line, so he needs a full rest.


4

My music teacher told me, a 100% criminal hangs, a 50% criminal sits. I have never been able to forget it. (It's snappier in German; ein ganzer Verbrecher hängt, ein halber Verbrecher sitzt.)


1

This is fun! Here's the goofy mnemonic device I was taught in elementary school: Imagine the rest as a ham. Yes, a ham. As long as it's whole and uncut, it hangs (on a hook under the ceiling of the larder). When you take it down and cut it in half, it rests on top (of the kitchen table) - just like the whole rest hangs below its line and the half sits on ...


12

A whole-note (semibreve) rest hangs D-O-W-N from the line (four letters, so four beats). A half-note rest points U-P from the line (two letters, so two beats).



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