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1

If one wants to use staff association as a strong hand indication while retaining rhythmically helpful grouping, one can use notation like the following:


0

These chords are known as slash chords or hybrid chords. For example: C/B, where C is the chord and B is the bass note. From Jazzology: With a diagonal line, the symbol above refers to a chords while the one below to a bass note only. Note that when there is a horizontal line, it refers to a different thing (polychord). A slash chord might sound ...


-2

There is a general distinction between "closed" and "open" voicings of chords -- what you gave as an example looks like a closed voicing (where the notes of the chord are as close as they can be). When creating an open chord voicing using many notes spread over a number of octaves, it is often good to follow the spacing of the overtone series: use octaves ...


3

Another use (not applicable to your example), very frequently encountered in orchestral or ensemble scores is as rehearsal mark. It may be letters or numbers either in a circle or square. They can be recognized as such, since they appear in strict sequence (A, B, C...). Sometimes "I" is omitted not to be mixed up with "J". Their purpose is, to have reference ...


6

It's the form of the piece. As you can see both sections with the A above them have very similar rhythmic patterns and the sections that have A' have different rhythmic patterns then that of A. So the piece has a form of AA'AA'.


3

possible voicings of a 3 note chord include those 3 halfsteps in ANY and ALL of the 7.3 octaves. your example is ok for when the 1,3,5 are only used once. But maybe you want 3 separate bass notes in 3 of the lower octaves, plus a 3rd in octave 4, and 2 5ths in octaves 5 and 6. You could have that 3 note chord playing on 21-ish possible notes or any ...


4

There's the standard root-3rd-5th making a root position, then 1st inversion with 3rd-5th-root up an octave, and 2nd inversion, with 5th at the bottom-root (up an octave from original)-3rd(up as well).Go up another step and it's back to root. As there are so many combinations of the three notes available on several instruments, I don't believe there is a ...


1

To me it sounds like quartal harmony and is non-functional in a traditional tonal way, it also has no strong tonal implications. Probably I would name it F7sus4/G although the chord symbol system is not ideal for such harmony. Bearing in mind that sometimes jazz composers write out the scales/modes rather than chords you could just say Eb pentatonic scale/G ...


10

It's an Eb6/9 chord with a G in the bass. A major 6/9 chord is a chord that has the basis of a major triad and has a major 6th and a major 9th(major 2nd) in it without a 7th. The spelling is Eb G Bb C F. The full chord symbol would be Eb6/9/G. Also as a side note, it would be difficult for this chord to function as a dominant as the leading tone of C ...


3

The standard notation I've seen is just to keep writing degree signs before the numerical interval for multiply diminished and plus signs for augmented. Your abbreviated version doesn't conflict with anything I've seen, bit I wouldn't immediately recognize it either. Just +++++5 for quintuply-augmented fifth. I think the use of d and A can be a little ...


4

A triple bar like the one seen in the image refers to a tremolo between two notes or chords. A tremolo is simply a rapid alternation between these two notes or chords. The entire tremolo lasts the time either chord is notated as, not the sum of the two.


12

It's a tremolo. The performer should rapidly alternate between the first two notes and the second two notes for two beats. The notation can be a bit confusing because it looks like it might last twice as long, but both notes of a tremolo are supposed to be written as the full length of the tremolo. Not to be confused with tremolo on orchestral string ...


12

These are frequency ratios. The first digit is the common denominator (10). In a deminished seventh the following ratios are present: 12/10 = 6/5 = minor third 14/10 = 7/5 ~ sqrt(2) ~ diminished fifth 17/10 : this is trickier In a diminished seventh chord the fourth note is a diminished seventh, which is enharmonic to the major sixth (whose frequency is ...


3

There is one overarching reason it's not a G11 chord, and that's because it's missing the third. You need to have a major 3rd and flat 7 in there for it to be any part of the G dominant family, those are the defining notes. So G7, G9, G11, G13, none of those can be voiced missing the B or F, no matter what. After that point, it's arguing enharmonics as to ...


-3

I'd say forget the all-to-common fetishistic obsession over forcing notes into extended chords and just label what's there: As has been written already, F6/G. Dm7/G is also possible. The context of the notes during and preceding it will influence how it's perceived by a listener. There's no 3rd (B or Bb) for it to be a G and that influences the G's reign ...


2

First, I would say G9sus4. To simplify or leave it open to interpretation (depending on the context), Gsus. I've seen it written as F/G, is technically correct (or F6/G in your case). If it should be helpful for a player like you said, then use Gsus, IMO. update Maybe F/G (or F6/G) is not technically correct, because it's not an inversion. But I believe ...


4

F6/G is one choice.G9sus4 is another. And because Dm7 has exactly the same 4 notes as F6, Dm7/G is another.As the piece is in C, any would do, although it would be helpful if the name it used was a V of the next chord. (Cycle of 4ths/5ths).


10

It would be a G9sus4. It could technically also be F6/9/G but that would look very confusing on a lead sheet. When naming a chord you have to look at what you have and what you are missing. You have the notes G F A C D. While there is an F major triad, having a G as the bass doesn't make it feel like a chord based off F major because it is rare to put a ...



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