Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Swing doesn't affect eight notes as such but changes the meter of the bar. Any note longer than a sixteenth that falls on the 'and' is delayed. Typically, this happens with eights but it can also happen to quarters which start on the 'and'. Same for dotted quarters. Sixteenth (or shorter) are exceptions: they remain straight and are never swung (when eights ...


4

OK, I think I've tracked this down. My college's library doesn't have the specific version of the score you're looking at, but I found the same passage in two different editions. Neither edition has measure numbers, and they deal with barlines very differently during this passage. In one edition, when Violetta starts the word "ah!" and sings the cascading ...


2

It sounds like a mistake in the score. Just like you occasionally see typos in published books, "errata" can pop-up every now and then in a score. I'd recommend using the nearest measure numbers before and after this one to confirm if it's just one fluke, or the entire score is mislabeled.


1

I'll caveat this by saying that I'm just going by ear here, and I don't have a keyboard handy to check my results. Listening to the song, I think you're pretty close. You're hearing the bass/root motion descending a third, then ascending back up by two steps. However, I think that what you're identifying as III is actually the tonic (I). If you listen to the ...


8

You're part of the way there. The mistake you're making, is hearing which chord is the tonic, and so which key you are in. In fact, the first chord is chord one, the tonic (Fm on the live version I just listened to on Spotify), so the progression is: Fm Db Eb Fm etc. In other words, this is i VI VII i using the chords taken from the natural minor scale (i.e. ...


1

You can use the Repeat Sign which is used to repeat some certain measures you want. Just put the measures between these two brackets: If you need different endings for every iteration, you can use these symbols: But the first time through, the transition between the verse and chorus sections is 2 measures long. The second time through, the ...


0

I play fiddle for Morris Dancing. There is a tune from the village of Bampton called Old Woman Tossed Up (In a Blanket, presumably). It is written in 6/8, but it sounds like it was a 9/8 tune which was rebarred haphazardly. Many of the old Morris Dances have odd rhythms, as they were collected by and from people who were really drunk, so anything is ...


0

OK, first things first, those two ornaments, though similar, aren't exactly the same. The first one is only a single added note (E natural) while the second is two added notes (a new Bb plus a return to the original A). For a non-Baroque specialist, I think there are only five ornaments that one can assume a musician fluent in classical notation will easily ...


2

How about using acciaccaturas? Sure, you won't get exactly the triplet rhythms, but if you want those exactly you wouldn't use ornaments. This is how it would look: You could use a pair of acciaccaturas each time with a single (quaver) beam, but the double beam seems more in keeping with the surrounding music to me, and suggests the rapidity with which ...


4

Usually, polychords are written like this: (with a fraction). So, let's say you have Am {fraction} G7 and we are in the C major scale. You could symbolize that as VIm {fraction} V. Notice that for the polychords, there is no slash, but a fraction. Slashes are for the slash chords or hybrid chords (inversions). For the slash chords inversions, if the ...


-2

At the end of the day it's really a matter of preference to the composer. Most of the responses that I've read claim the second example is 'right' or 'easier to read' but those are truly opinions. It is my opinion that the first example is preferable, and that's the one I'd use. It has to do as much with how I was taught to read sheet music as it does the ...


5

Here's a common chart showing how the notes break down: Notice how each row is a full measure in 4/4. The general rule is that a note can span its direct children, or one of its children and one of its nephews. That is, a quarter note can span the 2nd and 3rd eighth notes, but not the 4th and 5th. A dotted note can only borrow from its sibling, not its ...


8

If you are referring strictly to music written obeying to traditional rhythmic conventions (with rational time signatures and regular/even division), then your second example is more suitable. Please keep in mind that the first example is not wrong, but the second will make sight-reading much easier, as our own expectations when seeing a piece in 4/4 make us ...


3

The ideal is to keep each beat self-contained, so the second is preferrable.In 4/4 it's certainly best to keep each half of the bar separate, so anything which goes between beats 2 and 3 are shown as tied.It's easier to read, and the ties actually make you aware that the tune is syncopated.The same thing should happen in 6/8 too, which is effectively two ...


24

Yep, the second one is far better for precisely the reason you say. A general rule is that you shouldn't have dotted-notes that start on an off beat and carry through the next beat. There are exceptions even to this rule, but showing the underlying beat structure of the meter is paramount in the vast majority of situations. Elliott Carter is an example of ...


22

Time signatures and bars are not there arbitrarily, nor just to help count your way through a piece. They are there to provide guidance on the rhythm of the piece. Where it is accented, where it breathes. Some composers do write pieces with no time signature or bars, as an indication that there should be no consistent rhythm. Eric Satie did this for several ...


2

A nice example of a composer playing with the written vs sounding time signature is the second movement of Ravel's G Major Piano Concerto. It is written in 3/4 and sounds like it's a slow waltz in the left hand, but the left hand isn't playing a normal 3/4 waltz rhythm — it is playing eight-notes putting the pulse on beat 1 on the second eighth note of beat ...


-1

Back a few hundred years, it was common for music to insert a bar or two of 3/4 into a basically 4/4 piece (or vice versa). Often two parts would effectively be in different time signatures. The term for this is hemiola. Wikipedia describes this far better than I can: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemiola


1

Simple test for you to try. Take 'Frere Jacques', a well known song. Re-write it in 3 time.Ask a player to play it. Chances are that it will sound very different. That's because the emphasis in a song comes on the first note of a bar.Particularly notable when words are involved ! In 4 this is every 4, in 3, every 3.It also puts the 'main' notes in different ...


19

Your understanding of the math, as it were, is correct. And I would say yes, a multiple of 4 bars of music in 3/4 can be expressed as music in 4/4 (in a multiple of 3 bars), but I would dispute that the same can necessarily be represented as such. The bar line placement of a piece of music has tremendous impact upon live musicians' interpretation of, not to ...


0

Another way to look at it is there are basically five options an interval can be. Perfect Major Minor Augmented or Diminished. A perfect interval is an interval that fits in both the minor and the Major scale of the root note. So for instance C - G is a perfect fifth because both C minor and C Major have a G. Remember though that perfect intervals only ...


5

The answers provided here offer a useful trick, which is to quickly translate into a scale you already know to find the answer. For instance, if you know that C to E is a major third, then it must be the case that Cb to Eb is a major third and also that C# to E# is a major third, too. It's fine to use this trick when it comes in handy, but it sounds like ...


2

Or, to put it another way, Νo. 10 -Bb- A is a major 7th, so to Ab is a minor 7th. No. 11 - Bb - D is a major 3rd., so to Db is a minor 3rd.


7

Since both of them are flat, it is the same interval they would be without flats. So: Bb - Eb would be the same as B - E which is perfect fourth. Bb - Ab would be the same as B - A which is minor 7th. Bb -Db would be the same as B - D which is minor 3rd.



Top 50 recent answers are included