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18

I found this: Circumstances of history, mostly, but also acoustics. The first orchestras (in the late 1600s) were mainly string instruments. A pair of oboes was sometimes used to strengthen the first and second violin parts. Soon composers were writing separate parts for the oboe, exploiting its singing tone as a contrast to the violins. The bright, ...


9

Martin Schuring of Arizona State University music dept, and author of the book "Oboe Art and Method" writes: Circular breathing is an essential part of oboe technique. Everyone who has learned the technique will never give it up. However, circular breathing is regarded with suspicion by some, who regard it as a virtuoso party trick that distorts ...


7

An oboe is an instrument with quite rigid pitch (possibly somewhat depending on the reed, with oboe reeds having pretty much the shortest lifetime of all reed instruments). String instruments can be painlessly retuned, and most wind instruments can be tuned a bit more or at least can be better pitch-shifted when playing using embouchure, air pressure or ...


5

Learning to improvise in the style that Baroque musicians used at that time is quite a deep field of study. It's what we call "historically-informed performance practice." If you have a score that has the originally-published markings for turns, trills and ornaments, then there are specific rules on what notes to play. There is certainly room for a little ...


3

I think you don't have built your stamina just yet and you're pushing yourself too far. Take it a bit slower. Don't play for long periods and don't blow that hard. Try to do some stamina exercises on the oboe. Play a bit, take a small break and play some more then Like Edouard said, it might be good to go see a doctor. But most importantly, if you see ...


3

A properly played oboe uses very little air and rather high pressure. It's not uncommon for quite good players not using circular breathing to play wonderfully long, lyrically sculpted legato lines audibly ending up almost suffocated. It's not as much exhaling until the lungs are empty as it is holding your breath: they end with a gasp followed by sharp ...


3

There are a couple things that spring to mind: - Check that you're playing correctly. If you're straining yourself unnecessarily, then you will become tired much more quickly and will therefore play for less time. The comment that makes me bring this up is your description of how your lips / jaw get numb. To me that indicates that you're clenching with ...


2

Oboe is pretty much the wind instrument using the least air and the most pressure. So your problem is pretty similar to "doctor, if I try inflating tin cans for hours, I have the problem that everything in front of my eyes get black, and I have to stop at once, or I would become unstable and fall down." Any sane doctor would tell you "stop doing that, ...


2

Actually, that is a yes-yes. Research notes inegales for more information about the practice of purposefully "un-equalling" equally written note values for expressive effect. Baroque musicians were fond of employing double dotting and playing even figures unevenly. Jazz is a descendent of Baroque music. Where do you think some of our earliest jazz styles ...


2

Improvisation is a skill that has to be learned and practiced, just like any other musical skill. You can start with rhythmic variations of short phrases. For example, if a phrase contains consecutive sixteenth notes, then play a mix of eighth and sixteenth notes, possibly inserting a few quarter notes at resolution points. You can also use the same ...


2

It really helps to keep your left pinky curved and hovering close to all the pinky keys in the left hand. (Keeping your fingers curved and close to all the keys is really a great way to gain better technique and speed.) Trying to mash Eb and Ab with a flat pinky finger can lead to some discomfort and bad technique. If you want to spice up your options, ...


1

Because the oboe player can sound the A with only one hand. The left hand, of course, being busy holding a tuning fork to his/her hear. I have not been able to find any online source for this, but I heard it from a normally trustworthy source. Makes a lot of sense to me. Of course, the matter of why we tune to the A4 to begin with is related... Nowadays, ...



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