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10

I'm somewhat influenced by the philosophy of Jamie Andreas' guitarprinciples.com -- although please don't take this as a book recommendation, because I haven't read the book! A lot of what she says, I suspect, applies as much to the piano -- or any other instrument -- as it does to the guitar. The core of her approach is that we are trying to train our ...


10

The words denote totally different concepts and the difference lies in the arrangemental intent for the instruments playing tones in parallel octaves: Parallel, or consecutive, octaves If the intent of an arrangement is to have independent voices but two (or more of) them happen to move in parallel at the octave (or in unison, or two or more octaves apart) ...


6

If I understand correctly, you want a way to display a chord that is reduced to only the tonic (lower and 1 octave higher). According to this site; http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/lesson.php?id=245 They kind of call it (8). So I guess you could write A(8), but you should be careful to explain this this notation at the top of your sheet, just to be sure. ...


6

This is a question, which according to me, you should ask nobody else but yourself. The best way forward is different at each stage for each person. I may say playing 2 hours for 5 days is better than playing 10 hours for 1 day, but someone else may need just one long burst to get what he needs. If you see among virtuosos themselves, 2 pianists may have ...


6

I'm unsure what to make of the pain you're describing. I've encountered a similar problem attempting to play a piece with a similar technical challenge, but I never felt pain in the wrist joint; rather, the muscles in my forearm were very fatigued. I assume that's what you were describing. That fire is lactic acid building up in your forearm muscles, which ...


5

I have been learning "Rage Over A Lost Penny", and there is a part about one third in where the left hand quickly plays in 16th notes at about the same tempo the fingers are 2,1,5,1,2,1,5,1 and is supposed to seamlessly change the notes that 5 plays each time. Then I play 5,1,2,1,5,1,2,1 and about 6 more variations seamlessly with only two short pauses. ...


5

You have a couple good questions here. Parallel Fifths and Parallel Octaves occur primarily in realizing functional harmony; whether it is in a chorale, a fugue, or any number of traditional forms of the European Classical tradition. They are the result of two voices moving in parallel motion - hence the term "parallel fifth / octave." They are forbidden ...


4

there is octave notation for just pitches. C4 being middle C. C5 an octave up, etc. But if you're talking about chords, the Am could be any octave you want. And if you want specifically an octave to be played, as in an A arranged as an A3 and A4, I don't think there's a chord symbol for that other than writing octave, oct, etc. Usually the chord states ...


4

I assume that by "tones" you mean pitches, and that you're talking about an instrument that can only produce nine fixed pitches -- like a toy piano or glockenspiel. The conventional approach is to have notes corresponding to the white notes on a piano; that is the notes of C major, choosing a range such that a whole octave of C major can be played, perhaps ...


3

I did actually encounter this as a real problem. I had a break-in and all of my instruments and gear were stolen. All, except the 'Third Man" zither. To play my rock songs on a zither, I had to re-tune it to the key of the song. Fortunately, everything recent had been written using an Open-F guitar tuning, so the songs were all in C, C-minor, F, F-minor. ...


3

I think you could use a "modal" approach. And by this I mean to focus less on the key you're palying, e.g. A minor, and more on the notes and the mode they imply. For example, assuming A is your lowest note, if you want the minor (aeolian) feeling you could go for the notes A, C and E present in the Am chord and add B, D and F to develop some melody. But ...


3

Josef Lhevinne, a famous piano teacher and pianist addresses this in his book. There's no secret, except slow practice. Really, just don't play faster or in larger increments than you can manage perfectly. Shura Cherkassky used to sit for hours and make sure that every finger was centered over every note in a piece before playing. I've spoken to Jon ...


2

The pentatonic scale has always been a common scale choice when the number of notes is limited. It offers the largest range for the fewest number of pitches The scale allows you to play in multiple keys (most importantly, tonic and dominant) All the notes of the tonic and dominant chords are present within the scale Therefore, the pentatonic scale ...


2

When I play octaves, I do my best to separate the up and down motion of the wrist from the lateral motion of the arm. The nice bit of isolating the motion is that it helps in keeping a relaxed grip. It also makes it easy to practice fast octaves away from the piano (it's your wrist moving up and down rapidly). To build endurance, just practice the up and ...


1

A few years ago, the '5' chord appeared. Previous to this, there was probably no such known name. After all, a power 'chord' is not a chord in everyone's eyes. Should a chord be made up using 3 or more notes ? (O.K., use 1- 5- 1 ). In the future, we may well see '8' chords shown.It starts here...


1

I'd like to second the first commenter's thoughts. If you're experiencing pain, it's more than likely related to tension. To rephrase the line from Dune about "fear being the mind killer", I tell my students that "tension is the music killer". You should always strive to play from the shoulder, as that is the only joint in your arm designed for the kind ...


1

Sounds like the sort of issue that would be best solved by having a teacher watch you play and offer suggestions. But here are some general tips. Strike downward to play, perhaps with a grasping/gripping feeling in the palm, hard enough to bounce off the key so you don't have to use much effort to lift the hand and arm afterwards. Have the hand rounded ...


1

I'm going to go out on a limb and suggest a relatively simple psychological approach: Write a "piano" dynamic marking under those notes. To my ear they really only sound like eighth notes at about q=140. I think the idea of playing those notes loudly might be causing your tension problem. Thinking of them as piano isn't really going to change the music ...



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