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47

Note: For the physics and neurophysiology covered in this answer I am going to be oversimplifying for brevity. They are not the "same" but they have the same pitch class. Notes that sound similar are said to have the same pitch chroma and the collection of all these notes are said to be in a pitch class. The octave, however, does differ in pitch height ...


24

They're not the same sound, and depending on how specific you're being, they're not the same note (though they're both 'A', 440Hz is A4, 880 is A5). In most contexts, they'll be the same degree of the scale, which means they'll function similarly (but not the same) as part of chords and harmonies. You may be able to hear that two different A notes, played ...


14

They are both the same note, if note means letter name. They're both A, but 880 is an octave higher than 440. The 440 A has harmonics on most instruments, one of which being the second harmonic exactly an octave higher. In fact, on some instruments, this note is almost as loud as the fundamental, so the two can sound nearly the same. Most of us would hear ...


11

The words denote totally different concepts and the difference lies in the arrangemental intent for the instruments playing tones in parallel octaves: Parallel, or consecutive, octaves If the intent of an arrangement is to have independent voices but two (or more of) them happen to move in parallel at the octave (or in unison, or two or more octaves apart) ...


10

I'm somewhat influenced by the philosophy of Jamie Andreas' guitarprinciples.com -- although please don't take this as a book recommendation, because I haven't read the book! A lot of what she says, I suspect, applies as much to the piano -- or any other instrument -- as it does to the guitar. The core of her approach is that we are trying to train our ...


9

I have been following guitar lessons in a small group for over a year. Recently, we've begun specific training to recognize intervals in scales (such as major third, perfect fifth, and evidently also the octave). The most basic exercise was that the teacher played the root note of the A myxolidian scale, and a random interval (which we had to guess and ...


7

I'm unsure what to make of the pain you're describing. I've encountered a similar problem attempting to play a piece with a similar technical challenge, but I never felt pain in the wrist joint; rather, the muscles in my forearm were very fatigued. I assume that's what you were describing. That fire is lactic acid building up in your forearm muscles, which ...


6

You have a couple good questions here. Parallel Fifths and Parallel Octaves occur primarily in realizing functional harmony; whether it is in a chorale, a fugue, or any number of traditional forms of the European Classical tradition. They are the result of two voices moving in parallel motion - hence the term "parallel fifth / octave." They are forbidden ...


6

If I understand correctly, you want a way to display a chord that is reduced to only the tonic (lower and 1 octave higher). According to this site; http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/lesson.php?id=245 They kind of call it (8). So I guess you could write A(8), but you should be careful to explain this this notation at the top of your sheet, just to be sure. ...


6

This is a question, which according to me, you should ask nobody else but yourself. The best way forward is different at each stage for each person. I may say playing 2 hours for 5 days is better than playing 10 hours for 1 day, but someone else may need just one long burst to get what he needs. If you see among virtuosos themselves, 2 pianists may have ...


5

When playing any piece on an instrument different from the one(s) it was originally written for, it is extremely common to make minor changes in the peice, including transposing it. Usually those changes are called a transcription. In your case, you could just play a "flute sonata transcribed for clarinet", or a "keyboard fantasy transcribed for clarinet". ...


5

Josef Lhevinne, a famous piano teacher and pianist addresses this in his book. There's no secret, except slow practice. Really, just don't play faster or in larger increments than you can manage perfectly. Shura Cherkassky used to sit for hours and make sure that every finger was centered over every note in a piece before playing. I've spoken to Jon ...


5

I have been learning "Rage Over A Lost Penny", and there is a part about one third in where the left hand quickly plays in 16th notes at about the same tempo the fingers are 2,1,5,1,2,1,5,1 and is supposed to seamlessly change the notes that 5 plays each time. Then I play 5,1,2,1,5,1,2,1 and about 6 more variations seamlessly with only two short pauses. ...


5

Recognizing notes as being "the same" when the sounds are different (two different frequencies produce two different sounds, which may be the same note) is part of cultural training. You can instantly recognize two bearded men as being both "men" even though one is a dark-skinned baldheaded quadruple amputee and the other is an albino giant, and both are ...


4

I assume that by "tones" you mean pitches, and that you're talking about an instrument that can only produce nine fixed pitches -- like a toy piano or glockenspiel. The conventional approach is to have notes corresponding to the white notes on a piano; that is the notes of C major, choosing a range such that a whole octave of C major can be played, perhaps ...


4

there is octave notation for just pitches. C4 being middle C. C5 an octave up, etc. But if you're talking about chords, the Am could be any octave you want. And if you want specifically an octave to be played, as in an A arranged as an A3 and A4, I don't think there's a chord symbol for that other than writing octave, oct, etc. Usually the chord states ...


4

It's 4 octaves + C: CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB C. You count 4 octaves from the starting note and add the starting note again: C1-C2 (first octave), C2-C3 (second), C3-C4(third), C4-C5(fourth), C5-C6(fifth), as above. The first example you provided: CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB is 5 octaves minus a minor second. The second example: ...


4

I'm going to assume that you've already checked your flute to see if it needs repairs. Here are a few tips I can give you to improve your output of low notes (I've been playing the flute for about 6 years, so I used to encounter these issues in the beginning too): Practice the lower notes: If you are adapting your sheet music to an octave higher, then ...


4

As you detune strings, they start to get "floppy" and the guitar becomes hard to play well. To prevent those problems, you can use thicker strings, a longer scale length, or both. At some point, the strings become so thick that you need to widen the nut slots or else the strings won't sit in them correctly. You also may find that you need a higher action and ...


4

The podcast used the term "the same note" loosely. Maybe too loosely. But I suspect you do really recognignise that a tune repeated an octave higher has a closer similarity to the original than one transposed by a different interval? This is what they were talking about.


4

Simple way to demonstrate this to yourself: Get a piano or keyboard, and starting from any white note, count up 7 white keys. These two are an octave apart (so if you started from the 440Hz A, the higher one would be the 880Hz A) If you play each of those notes, you should be able to tell they get higher by increments (don't worry at this stage about the ...


3

Yes, in the sense that a perfect 15th or 22nd, etc., of C1 will be a C♮, not C♭ (which forms a diminished interval) or C♯ (which forms an augmented interval). The type of an interval remains the same after octave transposition, e.g., a minor third transposed an octave becomes a minor tenth, a perfect fifth becomes a perfect 12th, etc.


3

My bet is on the 8vb only applying to the left hand. The A1 in the left hand is supposed to be held, and if the right hand would then play another A1, this would disrupt the holding of the left hand A1. While this kind of disruption for voice-leading purposes is not rare in piano music, in this instance it would cause an imbalance in the decay of the ...


3

I did actually encounter this as a real problem. I had a break-in and all of my instruments and gear were stolen. All, except the 'Third Man" zither. To play my rock songs on a zither, I had to re-tune it to the key of the song. Fortunately, everything recent had been written using an Open-F guitar tuning, so the songs were all in C, C-minor, F, F-minor. ...


3

I think you could use a "modal" approach. And by this I mean to focus less on the key you're palying, e.g. A minor, and more on the notes and the mode they imply. For example, assuming A is your lowest note, if you want the minor (aeolian) feeling you could go for the notes A, C and E present in the Am chord and add B, D and F to develop some melody. But ...


3

Tuning a guitar lower than standard will certainly impart a darker, heavier sound. That's the reason many metal bands seem to employ various type drop tunings. A standard scale 6 string guitar (25-1/2" or 24-3/4") tuned down an octave (or tuned down to F# below the standard low E) would not be very practical to play in a typical guitar playing sort of ...


3

Standard sheet music specifies the octaves quite precisely. The lowest line in the treble clef, for example, is E4 (the E in the fourth octave): Ledger lines can also be added above and below the staves to extend their range, and you might sometimes see 8va written above or below certain notes to indicate that they should be played an octave higher or ...


2

The pentatonic scale has always been a common scale choice when the number of notes is limited. It offers the largest range for the fewest number of pitches The scale allows you to play in multiple keys (most importantly, tonic and dominant) All the notes of the tonic and dominant chords are present within the scale Therefore, the pentatonic scale ...


2

When I play octaves, I do my best to separate the up and down motion of the wrist from the lateral motion of the arm. The nice bit of isolating the motion is that it helps in keeping a relaxed grip. It also makes it easy to practice fast octaves away from the piano (it's your wrist moving up and down rapidly). To build endurance, just practice the up and ...



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