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9

No, I don't think it is the music per se. I think the reason you see more "postmodernist" stagings (and BTW, the Germans have a great word for this, Regieoper, "director's opera," which leaves the modern/postmodern distinction out of it) is that (1) a historically accurate 18th century staging would look very strange to contemporary audiences, since almost ...


7

To answer your question head on, an experienced teacher will listen to the student's voice for all the qualities you mentioned: "range, tessitura, and voice color". The teacher will then mentally compare those qualities to other singers that they know. They will also be comparing that voice to the kinds of voices they are used to hearing in various roles. In ...


6

OK, I think I've tracked this down. My college's library doesn't have the specific version of the score you're looking at, but I found the same passage in two different editions. Neither edition has measure numbers, and they deal with barlines very differently during this passage. In one edition, when Violetta starts the word "ah!" and sings the cascading ...


5

Actually, it was Wagner who revolutionized the operatic stage. (Of course, one of his reforms was to dispense with the term "opera," which he replaced with Music Drama.) It was at his Festival Playhouse in Bayreuth that the following innovations took hold: Hidden orchestra in a sunken pit. Darkened theater. No boxes (except for King Ludwig), ...


4

Okay, here's an answer, although it might not be the one you're hoping for... Having listened through to Stravinsky's Mavra following the score a couple of times, I can't find material significantly similar to Blanter's Katyusha either. That doesn't mean, of course, that there is no possibility of a link, but to my ears there is no easily discernible one. ...


4

The full term is "prova all'italiana". There are numerous references to this online; nearly all of them linked with the German (almost) equivalent "sitzprobe". It is easy to understand the meaning of the German phrase, it is literally a "seated-rehearsal", where the singers sing with the orchestra, focusing attention on integrating the two groups. It is ...


3

Don't let yourself be fazed by reading confusing things about Maria Callas' voice. During the years making her famous as a singer, she covered a ridiculous breadth of soprano fachs, partly at the same time in different productions. In her diva years, her voice deteriorated but she still swept the audience with her interpretation and stage presence. At any ...


2

It sounds like a mistake in the score. Just like you occasionally see typos in published books, "errata" can pop-up every now and then in a score. I'd recommend using the nearest measure numbers before and after this one to confirm if it's just one fluke, or the entire score is mislabeled.


2

A “technique” is (in general) a practical method to achieve something (such as an musical effect when singing) which requires skill. The “technique”, however, is the mastery of these methods and practical skills in a particular field (such as operatic singing). So when you say about a singer that they have a “solid technique”, I would understand that they ...


2

You will hear female opera singers using chest and mixed voice in the bottom of their ranges. But that's a small proportion of their range, which is so much larger than most pop singers'.


1

Mezzo Soprano refers to the range of voice that lies between the contralto and the soprano voices. A mezzo-soprano or mezzo is a type of classical female singing voice whose vocal range lies between the soprano and the contralto voice types. The mezzo-soprano's vocal range usually extends from the A below middle C to the A two octaves above (i.e. A3–A5 ...


1

I would just call it 'reviewer-speak', not an absolute reference. An opinion that feels like it needs more than one word to describe it. Like with advertisers selling soap, 'clean' is just not enough. Their product needs to get things 'squeaky clean' or 'touchably soft' etc etc. Technique seems to demand a qualifier, good/bad/average... solid/polished. ...


1

The purpose of legato is to run one note into the next, without separation between them. Usually in singing this occurs most prominently in 'melismas' which are points when a single syllable is sung across multiple notes. While there has to be some separation between syllables, you can still sing in a legato way, in which the gap between notes is reduced, ...


1

This sound comes from lowering the larynx slightly, which lengthens the tube from vocal folds to mouth, and lowers all the overtones regardless of the pitch of the fundamental. Lowered larynx sounds like rocky balboa Raising the larynx sounds like minime And you're right it sounds more masculine because men have a longer distance from folds to mouth.


1

The word that I have heard used for this technique is "covering," as in "he shifted to a more covered tone for that high note." As Greg noted, it involves manipulating the resonance chambers of the throat to change the formant structure of the vocal tone.


1

I'm not familiar with any specific name that technique has, and, really, it's a rather subtle thing that I wouldn't call a distinct technique in itself. You may hear this variously described as having a "darker" tone, or sometimes as being "throatier". What these singers are doing is opening up the back of the throat more (lifting their soft palate and ...



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