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When I want to hear a beat, my baton asks for it--nicely. If I hear that beat, my baton is very happy. Early or late is NOT a beat, it's an accident about to happen, and my baton is most displeased. The purpose of having a Conductor in front of an orchestra is just a wee tad bit more than offering the initial downbeat! Orchestras are NOT democracies; at best ...


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I know this is an old post, but for the sake of posterity, I think a few additional notes may help: At the professional level, when the conductor and orchestra are off in the manner you describe, it is intentional, and never accidental. Any such delay is no indication of the conductor's lack of assertiveness, preparation, or skill. The amount of this delay ...


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Write for the Bb trumpet. Accept that the player may choose to play the part on a C trumpet. Write for the A clarinet if you want its subtly different tone colour and slightly lower range. Don't worry about making sharp keys easier. Today's music is freely chromatic. The players can cope.


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Yes, both are common, and are the predominant instruments in modern American orchestras. For clarinets, the most commonly used are A, Bb, and Eb; for trumpets, C, Bb, D/Eb, and A/Bb (piccolo). (In other parts of the world, mainly Great Britain and Russia, the Bb trumpet is most widely used.) In the US, by far, the A clarinets and C trumpets are most common. ...


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Having just returned from a fabulous concert by an amateur band in rural France, with nigh on 30 players INCLUDING KEYS, a concert band will do you fine. It doesn't have to be a brass or wind band, and most orchetras play the more 'serious' music. In this band, the keys used several different sounds (as I do when playing keys with various ensembles), so it ...


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Let me begin by saying that I can't really answer your question about whether you should join a concert band or an orchestra (mainly because I find that to be highly subjective), however, there is one point in your question that I believe is important to address: As far as I understood, you want to learn a new instrument and join a band/orchestra with that ...


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There used to be a series of records called Music Minus One which released many concerto recordings with only the orchestra. Perhaps a search on "Music Minus One" may help. They are still around: http://digital.musicminusone.com/ The other possibility is to find a stereo recording where the soloist has been fed to both channels equally. The channels can be ...


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You could try a MIDI rendition, there are quite good ones out there, just do a google search. With a MIDI player that allows you instrument selection of muting (VanBasco Karaoke Player is good one and very simple to use), you can mute the harpsichord and play on top. Now, soundwise a MIDI rendition will only be as good as the sounds you have available. The ...


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Yes, and no! Everyone sounds like they're playing in the same key, yes, but looking at the actual music in front of the players, no. There are lots of transposing instruments about, which don't, for many reasons (answered here for several questions) see the music in the same key as non-transposing instruments. An example would be the Bb clarinet, which ...


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The Bb Flat clarinet is a transposing instrument of a whole tone down. Simply put when the clarinet plays a C note what you actually are hearing is a Bb. So technically the Bb flat clarinet will be notated in a different key than the non-transposing instruments but when you relate it back to concert pitch then it all comes back to the same key.


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There are a couple things you can do to make your sound more noticeable. But there are trade offs and risks. For example, if you use more vibrato, it becomes easier for someone in the audience to distinguish you from other sound sources. Depending on what else is playing, you have some choices in tone color: play closer or further from the bridge, or dig in ...



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