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13

They refer to divisions (manuals) of the organ: Grt. for Great (French 'Grand Choeur', German 'Hauptwerk') and Sw. for Swell (French 'Grand Orgue', German 'Schwellwerk'). For English, American and German organs, in a two-manual configuration, the lower manual is the Great, and the top manual is the Swell. French organs usually have the Swell at the bottom. ...


12

You asked "or is this fundamentally just a marketing success?" I think the answer to these sorts of questions always has to take into account the historical background. The Hammond organ came on the market in 1935. It became distinctive because it came first. It was popular and sold in large numbers. It was the first commercially successful electronic ...


9

The Hammond organ is what is called an analog additive synthesizer (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Additive_synthesis) and it works by adding together sine waves that are multiples of the base frequency. A sine wave alone sounds like a whistle or a dull flute, but the more you add up the more interesting the sound can get. The Hammond organ features ...


8

Just to add to @MattL's answer... Great and Swell are usually assigned to different manuals. (Although they can be linked by couplers.) The Great manual will usually be assigned to principal stops, or as this page describes it, the Great manual usually: contains the meat and potatoes of the organ: the principal chorus. The Swell manual will be linked ...


8

I found the below footnote in a transcription on IMSLP: It translates: I think that one could play the + sign, as a 'pinched' lower mordent. Where this is first notated, it applies to the sign above a single note in the right hand, however, there are further places where the same notation is used on chords, and below the notes, without further ...


8

Yes, dynamic changes are predominantly achieved by choosing different stops. No, baroque music virtually never specifies which precise stops to pull. The most you can expect is something general such as "Sur les flûtes", or "organo pleno" - and even this doesn't mean what you might think (almost never "all existing stops", usually something more like "stops ...


7

You'll likely pick up a lot just by listening to how your technique translates into what you hear. On the organ, once you move your fingers from the keys the notes stop sounding instantly - with no sustain pedal to cover your poor legato technique either! So the biggest difference you'll find is that you'll probably end up doing a lot more ...


7

Take for example the end of the second bar on page 51 -- the eighth triplet over the two eighth notes. The notes of the triplet last 2/3 as long as the regular eighths. That means this is functionally equivalent to three quarter notes over two dotted quarter notes, since a quarter lasts 2/3 as long as a dotted quarter. Noticing this makes it easier to see ...


6

Generally speaking, a minority of Bach scholars question the piece's attribution. Christoph Wolf, who is for many the top Bach authority does not question the piece's attribution at all. For what it's worth, the mark's against Bach's authorship can mostly be explained away. There is no direct evidence against his authorship, unlike some other works where ...


6

The Hammond B3 is by far the Blues organist's instrument of choice. Why? Hammond organ is the first electronic organ that uses "mechanical tonewheels that rotate in front of electromagnetic pickups." Yes, all the additive synthesis stuff is important but more importantly is how it is implemented by mechanical means, and uses 'drawbars' to mix and blend the ...


5

This is a deep subject. I can tell from your initial question (before we edited it) that you are unfamiliar with the concepts involved with using a MIDI controller keyboard with a computer, with virtual software instruments, and with interfacing the audio output of a computer with a PA system or amplifier. You need to learn about all these concepts. You ...


4

Check this out. Thumbing is the act of playing with one or both thumbs on the keyboard below the keyboard on which the rest of fingers are playing. This technique was developed in the late 19th century, and fell out of use after 1930. While at first an organist not used to this technique will only be able to use it to play isolated sustained ...


3

I don't believe you will be able to. The sound is indeed a piano and it's virtually impossible to get a piano sound from an organ.Even with a keyboard the piano sound isn't too realistic, as the way the sound is produced is artificial. A really good up to date keyboard will go to something close.


3

Tap out this rhythm so as to fit into a crotchet beat: 1 2 & 3 (equiv: quaver, 2 semiquavers, quaver) Now using two notes on the keyboard (one in each hand)play the above pattern like this: -Tap 1 with both hands -Tap 2 with the right hand -Tap the & with the left hand -Tap the 3 with the right hand. Repeat several times until the pattern flows ...


3

It depends on the piece of music you're playing. In your particular example, the triplets are quite important for the overall timing and sound, but they are not really part of the perceived rhythm. It is not really necessary, and perhaps not even desirable, to force your brain to count them. What you might rather do is train your hands to play these triplets ...


2

The obvious solution is indeed to use a hammond plugin on a laptop, but you will need a good audio interface to use this live because otherwise you will either not get the latency low enough or risk audio dropouts. The more trouble-free solution is a hardware expander module specialized for hammond organ.


2

Excellent answer from Widor, I just wanted to add a few bits from my personal experience (which is only a few months ahead of yours, by the sound of it). Registration can be a challenge: not only because you don't know what the different stops 'mean', but also because you have no guarantee that what you can hear from the console is what everyone else can ...


2

The Hammond organ is a truely great instrument with a haunting, sweet and very distinctive sound, precisely because it has a really unusual approach to tone generation. Consider yourself happy to have one! But this unusual tone generation means, obviously, that you can hardly create sounds that "work" physically completely different. In the Hammond organ, ...


2

The 'grt', sometimes designated 'I', is the manual closest to the player on a two manual organ. It's called the great manual. The other is called the swell, or 'II'. Hence 'sw'. Different sounds can be made using the stops for each manual, and sometimes they are coupled, so playing one manual operates both, giving more sound options.


2

One part of the distinctive Hammond organ sound in rock/jazz is the use of a Leslie speaker cabinet. In my opinion, it is also the reason that Hammond organs were becoming less popular for mainstream music requiring big PAs and selling and broadcasting recordings. Because a Leslie speaker cannot be faithfully reproduced or simulated with reasonable effort. ...


1

This page is useful http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_musical_symbols#Articulation_marks It says: Left-hand pizzicato or Stopped note A note on a stringed instrument where the string is plucked with the left hand (the hand that usually stops the strings) rather than bowed. On the horn, this accent indicates a "stopped note" (a note played ...


1

The cheapest solution. Take a cardboard. Draw the keys on it (of the original size). At least, You can be confident with coordination. I used this method (however, for hands), when I needed practicing piano pieces written for the grand piano on my upright piano (which doesn't have some keys at the top). That's enough for studying a piece on the first ...


1

I find that moving my feet as if there were a pedal board, when practicing on a piano, for example, helps. It engages the learning centre of the brain - not as much as if you had the real thing, but better than not. Playing the Organ is hard - it will take a long time to get proficiant. Have you got pedal exercises to do? working through them will ...


1

Don't know where you live, but here in U.K. the old style of organ (2 manuals, pedals), come along on occasions for little money. I bought one for £10 sterling, just for the pedalboard (although the 2 12" speakers were a nice bonus). If you can find room, this is a good option, as pretending won't tell you when you've hit a wrong note. There may only be one ...


1

Both of the above. If the keys and manuals are close to spec in width, then symmetry and D-D alignment can be true at the same time. AGO spec does say, "Left to right location: Centered under the manuals."


1

You need to listen to the song and decide the; tone, chords and key of the song, then make sure that you stick to these three things. using similar complementary notes and similar chords (maybe a harmony of the song) will make the song have more death and a richer tone. Basically you need to listen and see what the song already sounds like and where there ...


1

One approach I take is to think about a few different things: 1) What is the chord progression of the song? 2) What orchestration will sound good with it? 3) How big/what should my part be? When I first start trying to write something, I might just play each chord on every beat, or once per measure to get a feel for it. Then I think about which ...


1

So the pedal is working ok, then. It's just a matter of you figuring out the sound module part of your keyboard? Not having that keyboard, I'd say it's time to dig through the manual and pray :) Sorry, not much of an answer, I know... google the manufacturer's website for the manual in .pdf form if you lost it.


1

I was pretty happy with the organ sounds from the Boss 'Dr. Rhythm-Section'. It only had 4 or 5 organ choices, but they all sound good (and only one was "churchy"). It can be used as a MIDI module (as the sound-generator connected by MIDI to a keyboard controller). I've also seen drawbar controllers available but I don't know how (well) they work. More ...



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