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As suspected by alephzero, the word "tono" (in Spanish) or "tom" (in Portuguese) refers in this context to the "church modes", i.e. the Gregorian modes of the plainchant tradition. In The Evolution of Organ Music in the 17th Century: A Study of European Styles, John R. Shannon describes Musical Flowers for keyboard instrument and harp, the chef d'ouvre of ...


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So sorry, but you can't. NOTHING in the world sounds like a B-3+Leslie. I have heard ALL the so-called "electronic" and "digital" fakers, and anyone who cannot pick out a fake either is not a musician, has no ear, or simply is uninformed about a real, live B-3+Leslie sound. You might get "close" and that may be good enough for you, but don't fool ...


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If your keyboard has a low action, you probably need to use piano gliss technique rather than an organ technique, otherwise you will end up injured one way or another. On piano, the basic idea is to you the back of a finger or thumb so that the nail protects you from injury, not the flat part of your fingertips or your palm. For the safest results, you need ...


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My tip on learning glissando's is to use a finger glove or soft thin glove, to have a smooth slide that you feel comfortable with. As the technique develops, drop the glove. It comes naturally. Same with playing glissando's on the bass pedals. I love those and my audience is more interested in my feet! Take your shoe off and wear a soft woolen sock.


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one of the very early considerations that led to many clubs getting their own, or an act carrying its own, was the fact that they did not require tuning, could not get out of tune. No surprises at the next gig.



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