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12

This is an Turn, an ornament consisting of four notes. The double-sharp symbol indicates that the lower note to be performed is a g double-sharp rather than a natural g, so the sequnce to be performed is b, a sharp, g double-sharp, a sharp.


8

The first thing to realize is that notation and performance are different in Baroque, Classical, and Romantic music. The Romantic rules apply to Beethoven and later composers. The small squiggle (two zigs and two zags) means three notes, the first on the note, the second on the note a step higher (the "auxiliary note"), and the third on the note again. On ...


8

Trills are (unfortunately) one of those things that only constant repetition will aid. Your body is not naturally used to the movements required for trills. When you constantly practice them, your brain will eventually pick up on the movements and it will become natural to you. Note, by "constant", I don't mean a two hour crash course session playing ...


5

According to Bach's father's own Explication concerning the trills and ornaments, we are given a guide on how to interpret the trills. The Expliation was later expanded on by C.P.E. Bach. There is no question that an historically correct interpretation will start the trill on the upper auxiliary note (in this case the A). The ornament does not descent to an ...


5

In these sorts of cases, I trust the community of professional and semi-professional musicians more than my own music history knowledge. (Read: I searched youtube for several videos and saw what they did). For the uninitiated who stumble upon this question: a mordent is the proper name for the squiggle above the staff in measure 4. It is similar to a trill, ...


3

Start small and work your way up. Start with a hammer-on, for example, on the A string between frets 7 and 9, between index and ring fingers. This is probably the easiest place to trill, at least it is for me. Get that hammer-on good and solid. Try your best to make it faster. Once you master that hammer-on, immediately do a pull-off, and let the lower ...


3

I got an answer to this question after talking to a few musicians. The auxiliary note is determined by the melodic context. For example, in D major, an auxiliary F and D should be raised. Now, the trick is that there may very well be modulations so, for example, a piece starting in D major could turn into B minor, in which case the 7th (A) will likely be ...


2

Kenneth Wollitz in his The Recorder Book suggests using the alternative G fingering you describe, and trilling on your right third finger. I just tried it, and it seems pretty reasonable.


2

Here is a great exercise I used to give to students as they get started doing hammer-ons and pull-offs, just pick it the first time and make a trill drill out of it. Starting in the first four frets, where the 1st finger is on the 1st fret, 2nd finger on the 2nd fret, 3rd finger on the 3rd fret, and 4th finger on the 4th fret: Do every possible combination, ...


2

I wouldn't interpret stretto as accelerando. My guess is that Chopin put it there to prevent the other natural interpretation of the passage, which is to slow down, from happening. So, instead of doing an accelerando, the passage under the dashes should just be generally faster/flowing, probably slowing down during the last hairpin (>). You'll need to ...


1

I've heard this played two different ways: Option 1: Option 2: I believe the first one may be more technically correct, but you'd have to ask a baroque specialist. There may be other options as well, but these should be fairly in-line with the original style.


1

I'm looking at the imslp.org's photocopy of an original score, so I hope I got the right spot (no images allowed thru corporate proxywall :-( ). My guess is to start with the upper note of the trill as a sort of grace-note just prior to hitting the triad; then release the full triad prior to the final sixteenth. At least, that's how I'd approach a similar ...


1

They look very much like the second ornament on the bottom line of the guide (idem), and I have heard them played like that. Of course, they look shorter, like a combination of that "uphook" and the mordent. With this interpretation you could also play the first one as B-A#-G#-A#, especially if your tempo is faster. I think I prefer the more finalizing ...



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