Hot answers tagged

8

The short answer is yes, it matters. How much it matters, and whether it matters to you, depends on your pedals, the combinations in which you use them, and your desired sound. Here are some general rules that most people follow; nothing's hard and fast: Gain before synth. Effects come in two basic families. Gain effects alter the amplitude of portions of ...


7

As Indrek pointed out, this gives at least partial answers to your questions. In short, the answer to who first put foot pedals on a piano is not known exactly, but the practice seems to originate in England. A piano of Americus Backers from 1772 might be the first one to use foot pedals instead of knee levers. Then you have a different question in the ...


7

Short answer: Certain effects like overdrives and distortions typically go in front of the amp. Other effects like reverbs and delay typically go in the effects loop (when possible). Long answer: The effects loop on an amp usually sits between the pre-amp and power amp sections. Most of the "tone" of your amp comes from the pre-amp. Pre-amps tend to ...


7

1) Wireless has nothing to do with this. Wireless goes from the guitar to the pedalboard (if there is one) and into the amplifiers. The amps will see a normal signal through a normal cable, cause that's all they know. A clean/dirty setup like you are describing can be done a multitude of ways. 2) Absolutely, read on for suggestion of what product does ...


7

Most simple loop pedals don't know about bars - it's just a sound sample of a length you set. Typically: You start recording by tapping a pedal You play your instrument You mark the end of the loop by tapping the pedal. The length of the loop is now set. The loop keeps playing, over and over. When you overdub, you add sounds to the loop More advanced ...


6

I would say the more recent the music, the more often it's notated (at least in classical music). In modern music it is very common but it was used already at least by Beethoven. For example, in the 4th concerto, you can find all of una, due, and tre corde in the second movement. Liszt certainly used it; check the beginning of the Liebesträume, for example. ...


6

The conventional usage is to put distortion effect in front of the pre-amp; then, when you engage it, it drives the pre-amp harder, so that you get both the pedal's intrinsic distortion as well as pre-amp distortion. That being said, you should try both positions, and see what you like; there are no hard and fast rules.


6

It is "bad" for the piano in that a piano is not designed to have the una corda pedal (that's the "soft pedal") stomped on. The danger here is that by stomping, you can damage the mechanism that moves all of the hammers over, thereby breaking the instrument. On upright pianos the una corda pedal is replaced with a practice pedal in which a felt curtain is ...


4

It will always be easier to sit and operate pedals - the required uneven shift in weight from one foot to the other and holding it for extended periods can become quite tiring. If your biggest concern is how it looks to the audience then yes, you'll probably have to put up with the discomfort and awkward stance of standing but there are a couple of things ...


4

There are no solid rules. Try all the combinations, and use the sound you want. Having said that, feeding a distortion pedal into an overdriven amp is going to cause a very noisy mush. Some people want that, some don't. It depends on your tastes and the style of music you're playing. If you want the ability to switch between (pedal + clean) and (no pedal + ...


4

No - you can't just use any footswitch with any amplifier. Some footswitches are really simple - a make or break connection, but others do different things - sometimes voltage drops, sometimes active circuitry, sometimes polarity changes. So while it may work, it may not, and in some circumstances you may be able to damage your amp (rare, but possible)


4

There's one sostenuto pedal marking in Bartók's 3rd piano concerto, measure 75. It's in a slightly small type, though, so it might be added by an editor. I don't recall any markings from earlier composers but you'll find them in modern literature. There are many examples in Ligeti's etudes, like in L'escalier du diable, measure 26. As a side note, Bartók's ...


4

Answering to this: if a professional artist wants to pedal Bach's music, how percentages of his pedaling falls exactly at the same places and in the same manner, according to the Busoni edition suggested Nowadays pianists tend to use very little pedal when playing Bach (instead of Busoni). The pedal is usually not used for effect or to get a full sound....


4

In an upright piano the left pedal (fake una corda) functions by pushing all the hammers closer to the strings. Shortening the hammer travel distance makes the notes play a bit softer. The hammers, in rest position, lie back on the "hammer rest rail", and when you push the left pedal there is a rod that travels up the left side of the piano from the pedal to ...


3

No, you cannot generally use a footswitch with another model. Some are latching, meaning they stay in the position to which they're switched (either on or off). Some are momentary, which mean they're only on while either depressed or released depending on the design. Be especially careful with Peavey footswitches between models.


3

Say your first bar is 4 seconds long, so the first recording then becomes 8 secs. The overdub is only 4 secs long, so will only replay alongside the first 4 secs. (1st bar).The second bar remains as original. They are great fun, and a good tool to have.Make your own backing track in a few minutes, add bass, whatever, and play lead along to yourself.Scrub ...


3

Pedals often have a different effect depending on the pitch and volume etc. of the sound going into them. If a pedal changes one of these attributes of the sound, it means the behaviour of every pedal after it could be changed. Let's say you're only using an autowah pedal. It will respond to the volume of the signal, giving loud notes/chords quite a ...


3

On a normal piano, the left pedal is pressed to make the sound quieter. It does this by moving the whole hammer mechanism closer to the strings on most uprights, and often by moving the mechanism to one side on grands. thus it's less distance for the strike to take place. On some pianos, there is a practice pedal, often the middle of three, which brings a ...


3

The sustain pedal can also be used (on a real piano) for a muting effect. You strike a chord, release the keys, and a split second after you release the keys you depress the sustain pedal. If done well, this produces a sforzando effect: the chord is initially loud but then echos on quietly. Takes practice.


3

~The Chorus~ Chorus is awesome! Thanks to its over use in the 1960's, it's sound can make a whole song sound bluesy. The Walrus Audio Julia is the best chorus that I know of and is also the most vintage sounding, which is essential for a chorus to sound bluesy. ~The overdrive~ A light overdrive is all you need for jazz :). Not too much drive to kill the ...


2

Yes, but... It would depend on the effect and vocal range of the singer. It will sound much better through pedals designed for vocals, but it will still work. Distortion won't sound too great, but delays, echoes, and compression will work just fine. I can tell you from experience, as I run guitars and keyboards through bass pedals and the other way around. ...


2

As someone who uses various effects with my electric violin as well as with electric guitars, I can tell you that you don't need any special tests or reviews. Delay pedals You are right that without the pick attack, a delay sounds different for a violin than for a strummed guitar, but it does sound very similar to a bowed guitar, or when you use volume ...


2

From an executional standpoint, it helps to know how the harp's mechanism works. The harp's pedals are laid into a zig-zag pathway, and have the same kind of spring tension in an upwards vertical direction as a piano pedal. However, the pedals can also be moved side-to-side to go through this pathway. When the pedal is all the way up, it can be pressed ...


2

Open Preferences->Midi Sync. In the bottom half you have your input ports, with buttons for track, sync, and remote. To control Ableton midi maps, remote must be selected. You probably want to make sure the same device is not selected for a control surface in the top half of that screen as it's possible for them to both respond to the same message. If you'...


2

Just following up here. I bought a cajon pedal from my local drum shop for $160 with their promise that I could return it within two weeks if it didn't work out. Well, it didn't work out. There were two issues: first, the height at the heel was uncomfortably high, and it was a lot of work from a sitting position (it might work from a standing position); and ...


2

AB boxes use a footswitch (OR) to toggle between two outputs and a second footswitch (AND)to combine the ouputs . The image below uses double-pole, double-throw (DPDT) switches, although singlepole, double-throw (SPDT) is all that is required. The DPDT swiches are probably used as these are the most versatile and simplifies stock. If you look at the OR ...


2

The "best" option really depends on your budget. A very reasonable solution would be to use a mixer and route to an effects processor unit. There are also mixers with built in effects, but these effects can often be total garbage (especially on inexpensive mixers) so be aware of that. Mixing from a laptop will likely be more difficult to do in a live ...


2

I like using a vocal processor to add various effects to my vocals when performing live on stage. The type vocal processors I have used are like "pedals" or stomp boxes that can be controlled with footswitches but similar vocal effects processors can be mounted to a microphone stand or rack mounted. The vocal processors (some also include guitar effects ...



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