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15

From a sound design / sound engineer context As an effect, distortion is any process that alters the sound in the harmonic (tone, timbre) domain. Overdrive is a type of distortion. It is achieved by saturating (overdriving) the valves in an amplifier (or a simulation of this dynamic). In that context, overdrive is a subset of distortion. From a guitar ...


11

Connectors section at Specifications tab on this page contains the following: PEDAL (DAMPER/R, SOFT/L *, SOSTENUTO/C *) So I'll presume, that those are the pedals required for the answer. As stated at Piano pedals article on Wikipedia: Modern pianos usually have three pedals, from left to right, the soft pedal (or una corda), the sostenuto pedal ...


8

TL;DR Which is better? That's up to your ears. Both bypasses have trade-offs: True Bypass is the most pure and high-fidelity, but it exposes your signal to long-cable degradation (plus it's more expensive). Pedals with buffered bypass will color your tone (especially if you have many of them), but you can run long cables without worry. More explanation ...


7

As Indrek pointed out, this gives at least partial answers to your questions. In short, the answer to who first put foot pedals on a piano is not known exactly, but the practice seems to originate in England. A piano of Americus Backers from 1772 might be the first one to use foot pedals instead of knee levers. Then you have a different question in the ...


7

Most simple loop pedals don't know about bars - it's just a sound sample of a length you set. Typically: You start recording by tapping a pedal You play your instrument You mark the end of the loop by tapping the pedal. The length of the loop is now set. The loop keeps playing, over and over. When you overdub, you add sounds to the loop More advanced ...


7

It really depends on the genre you are playing. I'll go through two with you. "Classical": In many books the pedal points are notated. If they are not notated then it depends on the period that the song was written in. I titled this section "classical" because that's what people usually think when they hear Bach and Beethoven. The proper term is "Western ...


7

Effects are usually a relatively personal topic among guitar players, so you will probably get a lot of variation among answers to this question. I can give my opinion on the matter but it's always best to experiment yourself and figure out what you like the sound of. Generally I use an overdrive/distortion, a fuzz pedal, and a delay pedal for my ...


7

The line between Blues, Rock and Metal can be "fuzz"ier than you'd think. Effects can be broken up into three classes: Gain, Modulation and Time (GMT), and roughly, they are placed in the chain in this order. (If you place things out of this order and like the sound, you are under no requirement to change.) In the Gain section, Distortion occurs when the ...


6

If you want to perform Bach, I do not believe that you should be concerned with any editor's pedal markings whatsoever. Do not think that the score markings of a famous editor are any more important than your own ideas about how the piece should be performed, particularly with regard to a composer like Bach. Bach wrote for the harpsichord and organ, and ...


6

The short answer is yes, it matters. How much it matters, and whether it matters to you, depends on your pedals, the combinations in which you use them, and your desired sound. Here are some general rules that most people follow; nothing's hard and fast: Gain before synth. Effects come in two basic families. Gain effects alter the amplitude of portions of ...


6

I would say the more recent the music, the more often it's notated (at least in classical music). In modern music it is very common but it was used already at least by Beethoven. For example, in the 4th concerto, you can find all of una, due, and tre corde in the second movement. Liszt certainly used it; check the beginning of the Liebesträume, for example. ...


6

1) Wireless has nothing to do with this. Wireless goes from the guitar to the pedalboard (if there is one) and into the amplifiers. The amps will see a normal signal through a normal cable, cause that's all they know. A clean/dirty setup like you are describing can be done a multitude of ways. 2) Absolutely, read on for suggestion of what product does ...


6

Short answer: Certain effects like overdrives and distortions typically go in front of the amp. Other effects like reverbs and delay typically go in the effects loop (when possible). Long answer: The effects loop on an amp usually sits between the pre-amp and power amp sections. Most of the "tone" of your amp comes from the pre-amp. Pre-amps tend to ...


5

The conventional usage is to put distortion effect in front of the pre-amp; then, when you engage it, it drives the pre-amp harder, so that you get both the pedal's intrinsic distortion as well as pre-amp distortion. That being said, you should try both positions, and see what you like; there are no hard and fast rules.


5

A pre-amp amplifies a quiet signal such as that from a passive guitar pickup, or a microphone, into a louder signal suitable for the input of a power amplifier. A couple of terms: "Instrument level" - the signal strength that typically comes out of a pickup instrument. This is generally so weak that if you connected it direct to some headphones, you ...


5

Basically you use the boost pedal any time you need an extra bit of volume to stand out. Typically this is during a guitar solo, but yes, sometimes it is also useful in a song's chorus if the whole band picks up the energy a bit. But as with all effects, use your ears as a guide. Obviously you don't want to use it all the time, but for certain moments in a ...


5

This has become a particularly heated area of debate recently on the internet, but personally I think a lot of it is blown way out of proportion. Basically, a lot of older effects pedals (and most current Boss ones) were always "buffered" or non-true bypass. What this means is that even when the effect pedal is off, your guitar's signal is still going ...


5

The bypass jack bypasses the switch on the pedal so you when you engage the tuner you don't cut the signal. In a live situation you are usually going to want to be silent when you tune, so you should use the regular output to your amp/effects. Only use bypass if you want the signal to be heard even when you are tuning. This might be useful at home so you can ...


4

This is a complicated subject. The answer depends on which effects pedals you are using. The best way to learn the results of putting your pedals in a different order is simply to plug them together in different configurations and listen to the results. For example, a compressor works best if it is first, because a compressor works best if it receives a ...


4

There's one sostenuto pedal marking in Bartók's 3rd piano concerto, measure 75. It's in a slightly small type, though, so it might be added by an editor. I don't recall any markings from earlier composers but you'll find them in modern literature. There are many examples in Ligeti's etudes, like in L'escalier du diable, measure 26. As a side note, Bartók's ...


4

It will always be easier to sit and operate pedals - the required uneven shift in weight from one foot to the other and holding it for extended periods can become quite tiring. If your biggest concern is how it looks to the audience then yes, you'll probably have to put up with the discomfort and awkward stance of standing but there are a couple of things ...


3

There are no solid rules. Try all the combinations, and use the sound you want. Having said that, feeding a distortion pedal into an overdriven amp is going to cause a very noisy mush. Some people want that, some don't. It depends on your tastes and the style of music you're playing. If you want the ability to switch between (pedal + clean) and (no pedal + ...


3

No, you cannot generally use a footswitch with another model. Some are latching, meaning they stay in the position to which they're switched (either on or off). Some are momentary, which mean they're only on while either depressed or released depending on the design. Be especially careful with Peavey footswitches between models.


3

No - you can't just use any footswitch with any amplifier. Some footswitches are really simple - a make or break connection, but others do different things - sometimes voltage drops, sometimes active circuitry, sometimes polarity changes. So while it may work, it may not, and in some circumstances you may be able to damage your amp (rare, but possible)


3

Answering to this: if a professional artist wants to pedal Bach's music, how percentages of his pedaling falls exactly at the same places and in the same manner, according to the Busoni edition suggested Nowadays pianists tend to use very little pedal when playing Bach (instead of Busoni). The pedal is usually not used for effect or to get a full ...


3

Say your first bar is 4 seconds long, so the first recording then becomes 8 secs. The overdub is only 4 secs long, so will only replay alongside the first 4 secs. (1st bar).The second bar remains as original. They are great fun, and a good tool to have.Make your own backing track in a few minutes, add bass, whatever, and play lead along to yourself.Scrub ...


3

Pedals often have a different effect depending on the pitch and volume etc. of the sound going into them. If a pedal changes one of these attributes of the sound, it means the behaviour of every pedal after it could be changed. Let's say you're only using an autowah pedal. It will respond to the volume of the signal, giving loud notes/chords quite a ...


3

Best advise I can give is to think about which artist exemplifies any given genre in your mind and research his setup. An often overlooked item is a graphic equalizer placed after a run of the mill distortion box. By cutting or boosting certain frequencies post distortion you can traverse between many classic rock and metal sounds. As an aside, the term ...


2

Every pedal in your pedalboard already incorporates a preamp, or can be regarded as one. An overdrive pedal is a preamp. A distortion pedal is a preamp. A chorus pedal is a preamp. En equalizer pedal is a preamp. All of these boxes are designed such that any of them can be the first element in your signal chain right after the instrument, dealing with the ...


2

Yes, but... It would depend on the effect and vocal range of the singer. It will sound much better through pedals designed for vocals, but it will still work. Distortion won't sound too great, but delays, echoes, and compression will work just fine. I can tell you from experience, as I run guitars and keyboards through bass pedals and the other way around. ...



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