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Generic pedals that are useful for all electric guitar genres are: Volume boost and Volume rocker pedal for solos and for adjusting volume on the fly. Overdrive for solos, tone coloration and sustain Chorus for shimmering effects and to soften the harshness of the overdrive


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The line between Blues, Rock and Metal can be "fuzz"ier than you'd think. Effects can be broken up into three classes: Gain, Modulation and Time (GMT), and roughly, they are placed in the chain in this order. (If you place things out of this order and like the sound, you are under no requirement to change.) In the Gain section, Distortion occurs when the ...


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Best advise I can give is to think about which artist exemplifies any given genre in your mind and research his setup. An often overlooked item is a graphic equalizer placed after a run of the mill distortion box. By cutting or boosting certain frequencies post distortion you can traverse between many classic rock and metal sounds. As an aside, the term ...


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This is a subjective question, but my opinion is that there is only one essential pedal for a gigging musician: a tuner. Obviously, tuners keep you in tune, and they also serve as a kill switch so you can put your guitar down without worrying about feedback. I feel the best overdriven or distorted sounds are generated by tube amps, not pedals, for any ...


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Effects are usually a relatively personal topic among guitar players, so you will probably get a lot of variation among answers to this question. I can give my opinion on the matter but it's always best to experiment yourself and figure out what you like the sound of. Generally I use an overdrive/distortion, a fuzz pedal, and a delay pedal for my ...


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I would not take the Bach-Busoni edition as an authority. Busoni actually rewrote music because he felt he could do a better job. Your best bet is to obtain a good Urtext edition such as one by Henle which is devoid of all the extra markings. Using pedal in the Baroque music is not the same as it is in the Classical or Romantic period. You use it to enhance ...


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JCPedroza's answer is pretty thorough, but I think it's actually a bit simpler. Distortion, in general, is when the sound gets too loud for the equipment and the peaks and valleys of the waveform get clipped off. An effect named "overdrive" simulates this, only clipping off waves that are louder than some threshold parameter. So you can play quietly and ...


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Different amplifier or pedal input stages may have different characteristics. The sound of a guitar will be affected in some measure by the characteristics of the device to which it is connected. To use a mechanical analogy, consider the relationship between the strings and the sounding board on an acoustic guitar. The strings try to move the sounding ...


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One use for the bypass is when recording. The pedal then acts as a split box, the output is sent to e.g. an amp, while the bypassed signal could be sent to e.g. a re-amp box, which allows recording of the "clean" signal. This allows the track to be recorded again, with a different amp, the same amp on a different setting, sent to modelling software, ...


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This has become a particularly heated area of debate recently on the internet, but personally I think a lot of it is blown way out of proportion. Basically, a lot of older effects pedals (and most current Boss ones) were always "buffered" or non-true bypass. What this means is that even when the effect pedal is off, your guitar's signal is still going ...


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TL;DR Which is better? That's up to your ears. Both bypasses have trade-offs: True Bypass is the most pure and high-fidelity, but it exposes your signal to long-cable degradation (plus it's more expensive). Pedals with buffered bypass will color your tone (especially if you have many of them), but you can run long cables without worry. More explanation ...


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The bypass jack bypasses the switch on the pedal so you when you engage the tuner you don't cut the signal. In a live situation you are usually going to want to be silent when you tune, so you should use the regular output to your amp/effects. Only use bypass if you want the signal to be heard even when you are tuning. This might be useful at home so you can ...


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Basically you use the boost pedal any time you need an extra bit of volume to stand out. Typically this is during a guitar solo, but yes, sometimes it is also useful in a song's chorus if the whole band picks up the energy a bit. But as with all effects, use your ears as a guide. Obviously you don't want to use it all the time, but for certain moments in a ...


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From a sound design / sound engineer context As an effect, distortion is any process that alters the sound in the harmonic (tone, timbre) domain. Overdrive is a type of distortion. It is achieved by saturating (overdriving) the valves in an amplifier (or a simulation of this dynamic). In that context, overdrive is a subset of distortion. From a guitar ...



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