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I like using a vocal processor to add various effects to my vocals when performing live on stage. The type vocal processors I have used are like "pedals" or stomp boxes that can be controlled with footswitches but similar vocal effects processors can be mounted to a microphone stand or rack mounted. The vocal processors (some also include guitar effects ...


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The "best" option really depends on your budget. A very reasonable solution would be to use a mixer and route to an effects processor unit. There are also mixers with built in effects, but these effects can often be total garbage (especially on inexpensive mixers) so be aware of that. Mixing from a laptop will likely be more difficult to do in a live ...


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The sustain pedal can also be used (on a real piano) for a muting effect. You strike a chord, release the keys, and a split second after you release the keys you depress the sustain pedal. If done well, this produces a sforzando effect: the chord is initially loud but then echos on quietly. Takes practice.


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On a normal piano, the left pedal is pressed to make the sound quieter. It does this by moving the whole hammer mechanism closer to the strings on most uprights, and often by moving the mechanism to one side on grands. thus it's less distance for the strike to take place. On some pianos, there is a practice pedal, often the middle of three, which brings a ...



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