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12

It sounds to me like this: So, basically a slow but straightforward 6/8 beat, and then around 6.22, the bassdrum breaks the regular pattern - it comes too soon. I'm not sure if I got the exact timing right but it feels like what I denoted - a "hemiole" - the 3/8ths in the second half of the measure are suddenly divided in 2 equal parts. The hemiole in ...


9

This instrument is specifically a ganzá [gahn-ZAH], a kind of shaker of African origins and very common in Brazil. It is fairly inexpensive and can be easily found at music instrument stores around the world. You can ghetto-replicate its sound by putting some small pebbles or large-grained sand into any Aluminium canister (cocktail shakers make for a very ...


8

Your two options really are shaving them down (assuming they aren't dirty with excess mass to begin with) or adding weight--probably with some kind of heavy gum or resin either near the center or edge of the crotale. I would first recommend analyzing the actual pitch of each crotale using a tuner, or if possible a musical spectrum analyzer so you can see ...


7

There are some things that will make you lose less: a big revelation for me was when I realized I was using way more bow and force than necessary. A combination of weight (literal weight, let gravity do more of the work than muscle) and a slow stroke using minimal bow length helped a lot. Also, the examples here are amplified; if possible, practice the ...


6

Simple answer - they just count, as they do in any song. But here, they may count 1,2 -1,2 - 1,2 - 1,2,3 - 1,2. If the beat is slower, they may count 123,456 - 123,456 - 123,456,789 - 123,456 for each of the quavers (1/8 notes). The pulse is followed in that all quavers are the same length, so the count will be steady.


6

Yes, drilling the end of each crack will stop it from spreading. As far as bent cymbals go, simply hammering it back will cause additional tonal change (an possibly cause a crack, or section to chip off). It is possible to repair the shape, but the sound will never be the same. If you have access to vice-grip or a table vice, I would recommend the ...


5

If you're just looking for more rudiment-type patterns to practice, the 40 standard rudiments are only the beginning. There are literally thousands of potential new licks and patterns, many of which elaborate on the original 40. These are often referred to as 'Hybrid Rudiments', to emphasize that they combine and extend the traditional 40. This list of 128 ...


5

The primary reason for this difference is in the mechanics of the drums themselves. Snare drums have both top and bottom heads that are usually tuned to a relatively high tension compared with the timpani. Hence, all the notes are extremely staccato and have virtually no sustain to them at all, so it is very difficult to play a note on the drum in the 50 or ...


5

I've done this repair several times to the pieces in my maraca collection. I collect the gourd maracas, but gig with synthetic or rawhide. You have two dissimilar surfaces. Close, but not the same. Regular white glue has a lot of water, and the gourd surface of the maraca will want to soak up the water in the glue. I like the yellow carpenters glue. Here ...


5

There are many differences, both in pitch and timbre. I've seen triangles used with a 10" side length down to 4", and you can purchase them made out of a variety of different materials and construction methods. Some pieces even call for three different triangles of different pitch. So no, there's no defined standard pitch. A percussionist just chooses the ...


5

Based on what you've given us to go on, the instrument with the resonant frequency of this cave you visit would be an identical cave. :-) Before you start thinking about instruments, materials, or tuning, you need some ballpark as to what this resonant frequency actually is. The most reliable way to determine this would be to bring a tone generator (like a ...


5

From my experience, the feel is the most difficult thing to get familiar with in music. It takes years and years of playing and listening the kind of music (it might not be so many years on some kind of musics). Since you want to learn, you might want to start with some more simple percussive rhythms. At first, it won't be the result you want right now, but ...


5

The perhaps too technical term is additive rhythms. Even before Messiaen, folk songs (e.g., Celtic, Quebecois, Middle East) also sometimes dropped or added a beat at the end of a phrase, a practice occasionally adopted by post-1970 hymnody, but I know of no universal technical term for that. "Irregular meter" may be as technical as it needs to get.


5

TL;DR: If you are a beginner, your teacher will probably ask you to get a practice-pad and some drum sticks. If you are just starting as a percussionist, you will first need to learn basic rudiments, which will allow you to play a range of percussion instruments, and then specialise at some instruments if you wish to (unless you are starting to learn a very ...


4

Have you considered a brass instrument like trombone or euphonium? For me, the embouchures share some important characteristics, while still being distinct enough that one shouldn't mess up the other. If you are an advanced player and plan on pursuing music as a career, I would highly recommend continuing to practice bassoon throughout marching season, ...


4

Sorry about the delay. First thing, Samba is basically 4/4 or 2/4, I really can't remember any song with odd time signature. If you do, please let me know! I like listening to odd time signatures. The thing is, while being very "simple", Samba is also very complicated. As you noticed, you have a lot of different types of it. I'm not a Samba expert, but I ...


4

There is no common tempo (speed). Tempo varies between your examples. There are differences among your examples, but I see where you are coming from. I'll try to dive into what the 4 patterns share. 4/4 or mainly 4/4 time. The snare drum on the beats 2 and 4 (which some call the weak beats) and the kick drum on every beat or beats 1 and 3 (Led Zeppelin's ...


3

You don't need to do anything special, in most cases. Just play an extra beat in the bar, or one beat less. It should be pretty obvious whether the odd beat (or beats) is a "strong" beat or not. For example, if you're doing a standard 4/4 rock beat with snare drum strokes on the 2nd and 4th beats, and you have one odd 3/4 bar, it may be that you need to play ...


3

I would start by listening to a few different Brazilian Samba pieces and just try and count them. After a while, you should have an idea what kind of time signature they follow. From there I would notate what beats are accented. From that you should be able to understand the feel and make a drum track that has a similar feel. It may not be the exact same, ...


3

The thing you haven't really taken into account is that all instruments (including metal bars) have a range of frequencies, not just one, and you may have a range of resonant frequencies in the cave itself, so you will need to think about what tone you are intending to get. For example you may use an instrument that happens to have a harmonic at a resonant ...


3

My answer will largely contain excerpts from Robert Breithaupt's book "The Complete Percussionist." The Cross Grip is derived by crossing a second mallet over a single mallet, held in a traditional style. This grip creates stability within the grip, but does not provide for the independent control of the mallets needed for much advanced marimba literature. ...


3

I discussed this topic with my teacher a few weeks ago because I also had problems with dampening the timpani. I never managed to do it without adding any noise from touching the head. He gave me three tips that solved most of my problems: Although it is desirable to have the muting as silent and perfect as possible, not everything you hear is heard by the ...


3

In short, yes, the skills you develop on one of the standard western mallet pitched idiophones (marimba, xylophone, vibraphone, and glockenspiel) will transfer to the others. All use the common pitch layout similar to a piano keyboard, and read the same music (although marimba and vibraphone do much more in the bass clef than the others). Most young ...


3

This question is more suited to physics stackexchange but anyway.. This shows you to calculate frequency of vibrating bars, rods and tubes: http://fiziks.net/physicsmusic/Experiment%2010.htm This is a paper on building a copper tube Xylophone: http://users.df.uba.ar/sgil/physics_paper_doc/papers_phys/lapp.pdf If you have any further questions check out ...


3

It depends on how you want to use the cowbell. I usually attach it to the top of the hihat pin or the ride cymbal, when I use it as a substitute for the ride, hitting it on every quarter/half note, for instance. Many drummers use this location for various percussion instruments such as tambourines. Woodblocks follow this pattern: they are often used where ...


3

This is generally just called a 'shaker'. In terms of creating the same sound with maracas: the sounds are pretty close anyway! Try holding the maracas the wrong way up (with your hand around the bulb), which will dampen the sound a little, and sound closer to the shaker in this video. Doing this will create basically the same thing as an egg shaker, which ...


2

In addition to NReilingh's answer: the space requirements for the marimba are also a good reason not to buy one. These beasts are huge! But the sound is awesome. the layouts for the various western "struck idiophones" is similar, but not identical: xylophone and marimba have a raised "black notes" keyboards, while the vibraphone is flat. This matters a ...


2

Neither grip should be painful, although Stevens requires a little more muscle development on the weak side of the hand which could cause some overuse strain when just starting out. The Burton grip is the 'jazz' grip. It was developed by jazz vibist Gary Burton. I've found that the Stevens grip is better if you need to play lines that jump around a lot ...


2

I started off using the Stevens Technique, because that was the grip of choice by the person teaching me at the time. It seemed easy enough, so I used it for a few years. That being said, there's one that most call "traditional grip." That's the one to use, in my opinion. It's much easier for playing fast passages with the inner two, easier to open and close ...


2

A dented or bashed cybal is repairable - just get it hammered out. Cracks are permanent, though, altering the sound. If you want your original sound back you will need to buy new ones. Cracks can give you an interesting sound though, so don't throw them away - your idea to prevent the cracks spreading is good though, remove the point of stress by drilling ...



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