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See this Wikipedia article on instrument classification. There are many instrument classification systems that have been used at different times and in different situations, so there is not one answer to your question. Here are probably the three most common classifications for the piano: Percussion due to the fact that the strings are struck by hammers. ...


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The piano is a string based instrument that produces sound by pressing a key that is attached to a hammer. This hammer hits the string associated with the key. From this point of view the piano is more like a percussion instrument with the capability of tuning. The predecessor of piano is the clavichord which is similar but more simple to the piano. It has ...


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It's both, and it's neither. Use such classifications only so far as they're useful to you. For instance, a piano strikes its strings, a harpsicord plucks them. So do we classify the harpsicord as closer to a violin, the piano as closer to a drum? And both as very different to each other? Only if it's useful to do so. Is it?


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Since the strings inside a piano have to be hit by hammers, activated by pressing the keys, it is supposed to be in the percussion family. Other, earlier keyboards also had strings, but some were plucked somewhat like playing guitar, albeit the quills or equivqlent were activated by pressing the keys.So, although it has tunable strings, it's the method used ...


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The "tuning" argument is irrelevant. Tuned drums are used in many different world musical traditions, as well as in western classical and popular music. Instrument classification is to some extent arbitrary, and many different "systems" have been used in different cultures at different periods of history. In western music, "keyboard instruments" are often ...



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