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3

What is the minimum setup to use VST on a live gig, hardware- and software-wise (please supply a complete list, including MIDI and audio stuff etc.)? Hardware: Any system capable of running a plug-in host (PC, laptop, tablet, mobile). Audio and MIDI interface that is compatible with that system. Software: A plug-in host (the program that will host ...


0

I don't have much experience in this area, but I can recommend Apple Mainstage, a $30 app for Macs that works with any number of MIDI controllers attached to a single Mac computer. Mainstage does everything you ask for in your answer except work with VSTs. If that's a dealbreaker for you, you will need to look for different software, unfortunately. Instead ...


2

If you really want to understand how alcohol and caffiene affect the body then you need to take into account a great many things, and need to consider them rather as a stimulant and a depressant. There's an interesting point about coffee that it makes you perform better than without it... but only if you're a regular coffee drinker. The reason for this ...


0

I play guitar and main vocals for a 3-piece rock band. Needless to say a lot of songs involve a solo and I needed to find a way of not having to song go "empty" when it gets to the solo. Essentially there's a gap in the sound where the rhythm guitar would be, as I move from rhythm playing to solo. I have settled on this : Use a compressor to up the ...


1

Great advice above, My preference is to start playing in whatever is a natural mode for you. You should try using your mind powers to get into the mood you want on the amped/mellow scale. Then after an hour or so of adrenaline and sounds pumping through you is a great time to have a puff or a drink. Extensive exercise can get you stuck in a mode and a ...


2

My recommendation is to find some method books that use polyrhythms (2-against-3, 3-against-4, 3-against-5 are some of the simpler ones but percussionists seem to pride themselves on the most ridiculously unintuitive large prime number ratios) and practice those religiously. Also try listening to and playing a lot of music in odd meters like 5/4 (Mission ...


4

Led Zeppelin was impressive for many reasons, including the fact that they relied on musicianship and live performance to produce live arrangements of heavily produced and overdubbed songs that everyone knows. They did not use extra players, recorded tracks, or excessive harmonizers to do more than four players could do with their own four mouths, eight ...


1

I'm a kale-smoothie drinkin' musician. Now that we have set the tone: When practicing at home (notice: NOT driving-yourself-home), when practicing at home I find that my self-listening is less stressed when taking some of those melty melatonin vitamins, 9mg to be exact, and it helps to practice before bedtime. Naturemade has 'em and calls them vitamelts ...


2

There is nothing "wrong" with Booze or Coffee however, you might be able to do without either with nutritional supplementation. Coffee will dehydrate you, regardless of the benefits. So, if you're going to sing, you might actually damage your throat if you're dehydrated. If coffee is as noticable as you say for you, then booze really isn't the answer. Based ...


2

The answer, as you can tell from the above, is whatever works for you. The musicians in my band either drink beer or coffee depending on what they feel will work for them. Since they're all professionals and none of them are problem drinkers, it's not an issue for us. Sometimes I have a beer or a glass of wine to relax. Being in a relaxed state of mind is ...


2

I'm a guitarist and vocalist for a groovy rock band. When gigging, I quite often have a pint of lager (about 4-5% alc. nothing major) just to calm the nerves a bit. I find it works well and that strangely it also gives me a bit more energy, for an hour or so. Then I need to chug the water to replace what's lost in sweat. Bleah. When practicing, I never ...


8

As I'm quite easily affected by alcohol and caffeine (being a lightweight and having terrible problems with focusing does that to you), I think I can add some stuff from my own experience here. The main thought to keep in mind is that this is different for each person individually, though. A dose that works for you may very well have an opposite effect for ...


2

One solution could be to find some more spazz-loving dudes/dudettes and freak out with them together with all the coffee you like. When that's out of your system you're probably more mellow with the other band. Side effect: some interesting music might be produced. Win-win.


2

I drank half a bottle of coke the other day (a big one) which led to a 4 hour session of music making. So I know where your coming from. Here are some things that help me. Lows are underrated, don't knock them. Just make sure you are generally eating and drinking well so you do have the energy I think what your describing is anxiety, so have a google of ...


2

I think you're approaching this with the right attitude of cautious attention to effects, one that can apply to almost any drug (except the really scary ones). The obvious next thing to try is half a cup of coffee. Or half-caff coffee. Disclaimer: I work for starbucks, so I want to help you find a way to keep drinking coffee, in some form. :)


2

There are already some good answers, but I just had a couple things to add. In general it's best to minimize the length of cable and number of adapters you use in your signal chain (I think you called the adapters "jacks"). This reduces the number of possible failure points. For example, do you really need the headphone extension cable? And getting the right ...


2

A mono jack in a stereo socket or a stereo jack in a mono socket will shorten out the right channel. Maybe your adapters are not what you think they are for.


2

Take a close look at both Cable 1 and the adapter (jack) connecting Cable 1 to the amp. Are you sure that these are both stereo devices? A stereo plug will have three metal sections (tip, ring, and sleeve). A mono plug will only have two (tip and sleeve). If you are hearing only one side, and then get both sides when you pull it part way out, that is a ...


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My instinct is to blames those adapters (or 'jacks' as you call them, but I've always used 'jack' to refer to the the input assembly on the device or the lead assembly on the cable). Adapters, being conceptually so simple, are easy to botch in production. It's just some bent lengths of wire that fit (or don't!) into little slots in the molded plastic. From ...


1

Practice starting: Make sure you can always start tunes at the right tempo and sing the first part exactly right. Do this the first thing when you start to practice, cold. Check your tempos with a metronome. Then try playing slower than your starting tempo. Then try changing your tempo. When you play in front of an audience there's a definite tendency ...


1

When you are in front of the audience, 40% of your mental capacity go to the audience. So you suddenly only have 60% left for your playing. It's a big handicap. You'll find that stuff that you have recently acquired and which works reasonably well is unusable on stage. You just can't make it appear. The other stuff you got beat into the ...


1

It is a piano concerto. A piano concerto is often defined as a piece written for piano and orchestra, where the piano plays an important role. In addition, the Wikipedia article you linked states: It initiated a trend for similar short piano concertos in the Romantic style, which have been dubbed "tabloid concertos". The word "similar" here would imply ...


0

The bands I play with normally have a 15 min break so the set becomes two halves. A band member will write a set either beforehand or on the night while the gear is being set up, based on the likely age group and any other hints.. "they look like they like their rock" vs "I think Led Zeppelin might cause an ambulance call-out". Either way there's a list ...


3

As we use a prerecorded drum track in Cubase for each track, we plan each gig well in advance, knowing exactly what will happen to the microsecond - this has some upsides, in that we can work specific tunes in to fit any set length etc., but means we don't have so much flexibility on the day (we can reorder them on the fly, but it's a bit of extra messing ...


2

In my limited experience with my jazz band, I open and close with our best tunes, and then alternate styles (swing/Latin/rock, fast/slow, different soloists etc.) for the rest of them. In another band, I've noticed that the band leader usually properly introduces us after the first song (or two if the first is a soundcheck). As well as the set list, we also ...


1

I also have the 'self-watching' tendency. A simple solution is to try to pay attention to the notes and rhythms and how they feel to you. This tends to absorb your attention and pull you back into the music. You want your brain to operate less in the realm of language and self-awareness and more in the 'language' of music. This may sound like a spacy ...


7

Depends on the event. I'm in a Celtic folkadelic band so let's take for an example a bar gig on St. Patrick's Day. First tune is a modal tune that any of the musicians can drop in or drop out of with any settings that they choose. That's the soundcheck tune that we use to tweak the settings for the monitors that the sound engineer has set up for us and ...


8

The better bands I work with will have a list of all the songs - numbered. (That's one of the reasons they're called numbers !) The bandleader/ frontman will decide what gets played judging by the audience. If they are ready to dance, or just want to sit and chat, or even want to sit and listen. Numbers are often called out in twos or threes, so we know ...


8

First, I mostly play folk, for very small groups. I’m sure a lot will change with your audience and style of music. The first thing to do is look at your audience. If I’m playing for an audience in a nursing home, I’ll choose more older and classic tunes than if I’m playing for a group of kids. If I’m playing background music, I’ll choose very different ...


4

I would start with lively and bright tempo songs then introduce a slower tune. Usually a cover band will play three sets with twelve songs each in my experience. We put in one or two slower songs in each set. People want energy and dance in a top 40 cover band so I would play songs that are popular and energetic. In the middle of the perfomance is where the ...



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