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1

You reduce you anxiety buy practicing and playing in front of people. Just like a sportsperson also has nerves at the beginning of his career musicians will also have it but by constantly playing in front of people you get used to the pressure and you learn to cope with it. You play in front of anyone who would listen. Your parents, at the mall, at ...


0

Lots of excellent answers here. Here comes Captain Obvious to chime in, however: have you tried seeing a psychologist/therapist? I wouldn't be surprised if they know of techniques based on more than anecdotal evidence to deal with this


0

There are three things that can go wrong in a performance: You make a mistake. This is entirely forgiveable! Probably no-one will notice. You play without feeling. This is much worse! Bear in mind that the more you enjoy your performance, the more your audience will! Consider that it is your duty to have fun and you should relax a bit more. Your equipment ...


0

Jumping Jacks. Seriously, there'a ton of literature on how you can change your body's response to anxiety with some simple physical exertion like Jumping Jacks, Pushups, etc. Good luck!


2

First, it might help to have a little more clarity on the root of the anxiety you are feeling. Are you simply afraid that you will play imperfectly, or does this have something to do with what others will think of you, or something else? Get clear about your fears, and you might see some strategies for addressing them. Second, consider practicing ...


1

One of my instructors told me something that has stuck with me - the audience doesn't care what you just did, they care what you're doing right now. Like others have said, when you perform, you will make some mistakes. But if you dwell on that and let your anxiety get the best of you, that'll just lead to more. Instead, just like the audience, forget about ...


5

There is some good advice here but I think the most important thing to remember is to learn to shift your mind to focus on the music and not on yourself. Think about presenting the music in the best possible way for the sake of the music. If you can forget about everything but the music and make the music the focus, you should have no trouble at all. ...


3

Those two points help me get through anxiety on the day of the concert. The days before are usually better used practicing than thinking about it. My life is not in danger. It may sound obvious, but to our old reptilian self, it's pretty much alike. Keep in mind that whatever happens, you probably will not lose something really important. You may fail an ...


11

Firstly, realize that it's normal to be anxious before an important performance. Experienced performing musicians often still have some level of anxiety, and there are even stories of some big-name artists who still get nervous. That said, there are definitely some things you can do to lessen both the anxiety and its impact on your performance. Use the ...


3

In my experience, breathing is the one of the most important things there. When we get anxious we trend to block our breath cycles and this causes more anxiety, as the brain seems to start working in an "under danger" mode. If you can get back to the basic breathing (don't forget to exhaled! most initial artists forget that to take a deep breath you need to ...


0

Another idea, if you don't want to read tab or sheet music, is to focus on your right hand and strumming/picking hand and don't look up the neck. It takes practice and time for your fingers to naturally find their positions on the neck. There's no real shortcuts except consistency in your practice (eg. always playing the chord with the same hand ...


0

One possible approach - which is what I would do but not necessarily the best - is the following. Do as you would do when you have to read the music (and thus can't watch the fretboard as @OldJohn points out): Get sheet music, or transcribe the piece yourself. Fire up a metronome at a comfortable speed and look at the music, not at the fretboard. ...


4

I understand where you are coming from. I used to have the same problem. To overcome this takes a concerted effort and dedicated practice. You must develop muscle memory so that you can put your brain and fretting hand on auto pilot. To internalize the movements needed to play a song, take one part at a time. Play it over and over while looking at the ...


1

Another factor to consider is the instrument. If it's piano, and you haven't played that particular one, you need something to get the feel of it before playing more demanding pieces. You may even consider your accompanist if they have to play a piano. If it's electric guitar, and you're using someone else's amp, simple is a good start, then you may be able ...


1

Generally, a boost pedal can also be a great tool when you have multiple pedals running through your pedal-board. It gives an extra "boost" to make up for some signal loss and the "lost flavor" when the signal travels down multiple pedals.


1

In addition to the good technical advice you're getting, I'd also suggest getting an idea of what your audience expects (e.g. my listening to past years' acts etc). "Jazz" covers a wide field, from wildly experimental collective improvisation to playing pop standards from 80 years ago, with some pretty solos added. "Downtown Jazz Festival" typically suggests ...


0

You try to tune the sound engineer into "from a combination of direct sound and the monitors, please help us hear as accurately as possible what's going out front". Then DON'T keep asking for "more me", if you turn up for a solo don't forget to turn down again afterwards... It isn't ALL his fault!


3

As the only chordal instrument, you and you alone can play chords under the soloist. However, full-blooded chords may work well in blues/rock and roll, but only sometimes in jazz. The occasional number will benefit from nice 5 or 6 string chords - maybe arpeggiated, but since the bassist will be rooting and fifthing to a degree, you can find the other notes ...


1

I was guitarist in a 3-person jazz combo, with bass and drums. I played a lot of melody and two-part harmony, with chords very occasionally thrown in. A good bass player will keep it interesting. To the extent that worked, a sax/bass/drums combo would also work. So in that light, consider yourself icing on the cake and...add flavor.


7

One golden rule. Play less. Lay out. Leave space. If there's someone in the group who CAN play jazz, allow him room to do it. And have fun! Let the music go where it will. Don't rehearse it to death. If it's your turn to play a solo, the melody will be just fine.


-1

you've never played jazz before but you have a jazz gig coming up? I'm sorry to break it to you, but "theory" doesn't go far at all when it comes to playing jazz. You've got 45 days of practice - basically you need to learn the chord voicings on your guitar for comping. This would be most important thing, seeing as how you already have a sax player who knows ...


15

The admonition I run into again and again, attributed to such lights as Thelonius Monk and Louis Armstrong is "play the melody." Of course you will syncopate it, put a little ornamentation here and there, but simple is fine That covers soloing pretty well, but what about comping? Guitarists with jazz chops rarely hang on the same voicing for more than a ...



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