Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Every composer writes whatever the heck he wants. Ultimately we have to try to get into his head and FEEL what he wanted. However, I will give you my knee-jerk reaction to these terms when I come across them while sight-reading in an ensemble situation. I tend to think of rallentando as not particularly subtle. Ritardando could be subtle or it could be ...


0

Oxford Dictionary of Music gives the following help. RITARDARDE, RITARDANDO, RITARDATO (It.) 'To hold back.' 'Holding back' Held back.' (gradually, ie the same as as Rallentando.) ALLARGANDO (It.) 'Enlarging', ie getting slower and slower and fuller in tone. Source THE OXFORD COMPANION TO MUSIC 10TH EDITION.


1

Ritardando and ralletando both mean gradually getting slower and according to my AB guide to music theory book they are both supposed to imply a gradual slowing down. And allargando means broadening, implying getting a little slower and probably also a little louder. execution does change in some cases there is no doubt. Because one of the pitfalls with ...


0

AC/DC's drummer Phil Rudd is religious about playing behind the beat. Very simple drumming, but when you actually sit down and play it, it's hard to replicate his groove and feel. Try some songs like Cover You in Oil, Gone Shootin', Highway to Hell, Rock n' Roll aint noise pollution, etc.


0

I experience this problem too sometimes. It is, as someone already mentioned, related to practicing the fingering/sticking/etc. But it is also related, at least from my experience, to something I would call "polymetric resolution", i.e. how much nuances are you able to produce metric-wise. I think what helps me the most with this is practicing a patter, ...


0

I do similar length gigs sometimes. I sing in a rock band and we like to party 'til late so sometimes this involves a 4 or 5 hour gig. Not all that often but sometimes. I have found this works.. Enhance Vocal Endurance: I'm no vocal trainer but I have learnt some thigns from this site. Eg I used to try to sing high notes with chest voice, pushing harder ...


3

Here are a few thoughts: If you don't already, you definitely need to develop a vocal warm-up / cool-down routine. You wouldn't run for four hours without stretching, would you? Why then would you sing? I don't have time / space here to suggest specific exercises, but I'll say you should definitely start researching. A good exercise works from the back ...


1

Besides sleep and hydration, which are key, you should warm up and cool down. Also, like any endurance activity, you have to train up to it at a measured pace and there will always be a limit to how long you can go. If you are hoarse all the next day you are probably hurting your voice, and that damage can be permanent or semi-permanent. If you get nodules ...


1

You reduce you anxiety buy practicing and playing in front of people. Just like a sportsperson also has nerves at the beginning of his career musicians will also have it but by constantly playing in front of people you get used to the pressure and you learn to cope with it. You play in front of anyone who would listen. Your parents, at the mall, at ...


0

Lots of excellent answers here. Here comes Captain Obvious to chime in, however: have you tried seeing a psychologist/therapist? I wouldn't be surprised if they know of techniques based on more than anecdotal evidence to deal with this


0

There are three things that can go wrong in a performance: You make a mistake. This is entirely forgiveable! Probably no-one will notice. You play without feeling. This is much worse! Bear in mind that the more you enjoy your performance, the more your audience will! Consider that it is your duty to have fun and you should relax a bit more. Your equipment ...


0

Jumping Jacks. Seriously, there'a ton of literature on how you can change your body's response to anxiety with some simple physical exertion like Jumping Jacks, Pushups, etc. Good luck!


2

First, it might help to have a little more clarity on the root of the anxiety you are feeling. Are you simply afraid that you will play imperfectly, or does this have something to do with what others will think of you, or something else? Get clear about your fears, and you might see some strategies for addressing them. Second, consider practicing ...


1

One of my instructors told me something that has stuck with me - the audience doesn't care what you just did, they care what you're doing right now. Like others have said, when you perform, you will make some mistakes. But if you dwell on that and let your anxiety get the best of you, that'll just lead to more. Instead, just like the audience, forget about ...


5

There is some good advice here but I think the most important thing to remember is to learn to shift your mind to focus on the music and not on yourself. Think about presenting the music in the best possible way for the sake of the music. If you can forget about everything but the music and make the music the focus, you should have no trouble at all. ...


3

Those two points help me get through anxiety on the day of the concert. The days before are usually better used practicing than thinking about it. My life is not in danger. It may sound obvious, but to our old reptilian self, it's pretty much alike. Keep in mind that whatever happens, you probably will not lose something really important. You may fail an ...


13

Firstly, realize that it's normal to be anxious before an important performance. Experienced performing musicians often still have some level of anxiety, and there are even stories of some big-name artists who still get nervous. That said, there are definitely some things you can do to lessen both the anxiety and its impact on your performance. Use the ...


3

In my experience, breathing is the one of the most important things there. When we get anxious we trend to block our breath cycles and this causes more anxiety, as the brain seems to start working in an "under danger" mode. If you can get back to the basic breathing (don't forget to exhaled! most initial artists forget that to take a deep breath you need to ...


0

Another idea, if you don't want to read tab or sheet music, is to focus on your right hand and strumming/picking hand and don't look up the neck. It takes practice and time for your fingers to naturally find their positions on the neck. There's no real shortcuts except consistency in your practice (eg. always playing the chord with the same hand ...



Top 50 recent answers are included