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4

Singing pitch is mainly controlled by the tension on the vocal folds. Higher pitch, higher tension. You failed to mention your age: the vocal folds (basically peripheral parts of muscles) and other movable parts of the larynx are fixed to cartilage. This cartilage construct gets a growth spurt (like a calving glacier) when your voice changes in puberty ...


2

Don't get down on yourself about it, it's incredibly common. Like Dom said, metronomes are your best friend. My favorite way to practice a song: set the metronome to whatever pace you can play the whole song without stopping and with minimal mistakes. Then, every day, increase the metronome speed by 1bpm until you eventually get to the speed that the song is ...


2

Playing too fast is a sign that you are focusing on the notes rather than the music. That is your motor reflexes are taking over the performance rather than your listening and interpreting head. As others mentioned, adrenaline might speed up your "flow". Try breaking up its effect by being comfortably below your limits and varying the tempo consciously, ...


7

It's most likely just a side effect of the adrenaline you get when performing, similarly to how someone will speak faster if they are nervous. It's a very common phenomenon and most musicians don't notice when it happens. Practicing with a metronome in general will make sure you start and consistently stay at the desired tempo. When performing you're most ...


6

Anything that achieves the sound you're after is a valid technique! That said, a guitar (for example) out of tune with itself will usually sound a bit unpleasant to most ears. However ... If you listen to Led Zep's Black Dog, the guitars are played twice, panned left and right, and just a touch out of tune with each other. I don't know whether this is ...


5

It's not commonly used, but it's not unheard of. For instance, Simon and Garfunkels song Cecelia has a detuned guitar in it's percussive introduction. In the art world it's sometimes done in a more regimented way to produce microtonal music, which is more like intentionally tuning to a precise pitch between the notes you'd find on a keyboard. It can also ...


3

The answer to most of this is relax, keep your throat muscles loose (yawning actually helps with this). An audience wants you to be good, so they're typically behind you, but if you act nervous, that'll come across in the 'feel' of the gig more than anything. There's various techniques, keep moving your feet beforehand, to keep blood flowing. Breathe ...


5

how can I practice getting fully in time with the drums on a track It's doable. We had a similar situation in one project, and with some preparation it ended up sounding great. Depending on what you are doing, it might be more trouble than it's worth, but if you really want and/or need to do it, you can. First of all, if the drum part was played by a ...


1

It's been several months since "googol analytics" posted a question regarding using VSTs in a live setting. If you're still looking for a solution, take a look at the Muse Research Receptor standalone unit. This is a dedicated unit for VST plugins. I have a couple of keyboard midi controllers hooked up to the unit. I use it on all my live gigs. Go to the ...


2

Being nervous about playing music in front of others is not that uncommon. I really don't think that you should meet with a professional to understand the problem. Unfortunately the solution to this issue is to put yourself in uncomfortable positions where you're forced to play in front of others so that you can overcome the nervousness. Familiarity breeds ...


2

Record yourself. Once you can create a usable audio recording, make a video, with the intent to put it up on some video platform (be sure to use material that is not under copyright in order to avoid the pesky rightholder corporations barging down your door). You'll be surprised at the level of focus and self-consciousness and number of retakes it takes to ...


5

What you have is hardly rare. It's a phenomenon that seems to occur more in some adults than children. Having run an examination centre periodically, I've heard far more grown-ups say "I really don't know why I'm doing this", as nerves kick in. It's probably due to the fact that kids are doing test and exams day in, day out, whereas adults hardly ever do, ...


1

It does depend on how loud you mean by loud. For the purpose of practice, anything that makes your ears ring after playing might seem cool now, but take it from someone who can't hear that well anymore and has constant ringing in their ears because of loud music (I think it was a Pantera, or possibly dream theater concert that did it in the mid 90s) I would ...


0

AS E & A not strummed put capo on 5



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