New answers tagged

1

I can only speak from my personal experience here, as I haven't studied this subject at length in any formal way. I've gone through periods in my life of being in-shape and less-than-in-shape. In general, I notice that it's easier to focus and be alert when I'm in shape. This applies to performing and composing music as well. There is also of course the ...


0

I found this in my own research: http://www.justinguitar.com/en/TE-901-SingingAndPlaying.php


2

I'll take a guess: did you learn your "technique" by using Hanon every day, then Czerny? Or did you start by assuming it was "obvious" that you play the piano by pressing the keys with your fingers? That will only get you so far, and pieces like the Chopin etudes will stay out of reach till you back-track and learn a better way. If your shoulders were ...


1

Barring any physical/medical issues, you should simply relax. It's the hardest thing to do, but will yield the most benefits. Agility, speed, power, and longevity all require relaxation more than any amount of physical strength or finger dexterity. Your spine should be your tree trunk, and try to feel the weight of your forearm at the tips of your fingers as ...


4

I can totally understand your question. I experienced the same thing when first learning to play guitar to accompany my singing. I have met some folks who play the guitar very well but cannot combine singing and guitar playing and do both at the same time. Even professional musicians and famous performers often choose to leave the playing up to their ...


1

It may sound a tad abstract, but it helped for me: Try to not focus on what you're playing on the guitar and on what you're singing, but try to listen to the piece of music that you're playing as a whole. The vocals and guitar are just two components of a musical piece and in a song they come together. A perfect example for this convergence is an ...


0

Are you sure you don't have any physical conditions, such as tendonitis? If you're describing pain, even once you slow down, and the inability to progress, that might be a sign that you should at least visit your primary doctor, if not a hand surgeon.


2

You've given a clear hint in your question that it's more likely technique than raw strength. You say it happens very quickly (30 seconds). I bet that if you are playing at a comfortable, slow place, you can play for much, much longer, and play many more keystrokes overall. Instead focusing on building up strength, focus on relaxing your muscles when you ...


3

This part sounds very familiar to me: (As an aside, I also suffer from forearm fatigue (left arm) when playing guitar when there are enough bar chords.) Fatigue (assuming we're no longer beginners) doesn't always occur because the muscles are weak; it can be caused by different sets of muscles opposing each other. (If so, strength exercises won't ...


10

You don't want to "push hard", that's more likely to result in injury than in more endurance. As soon as your muscles start to feel tired, you should take a break. Here are some tips on managing your endurance: Take care of your general health. Eat right, stay hydrated, get some cardiovascular excercise, and get plenty of sleep. Use proper technique. Make ...


2

The pianist will have the score with both parts showing. He/she will be able to nod you in. It won't look bad, as it'll be rather like 'I've done my part, now I'm handing back to you'. You could actually reciprocate, making it look like proper teamwork. Other than that, the existing answers seem to cover most other options.


0

What I have found works is to do Harmonic Analysis of the score that you want to memorise. There is great parallels as to how actors learn long plays. When actors for example want to memorise a Shakespeare play they visualise each scene in there minds eye. The mind has great potential for memory when the visual approach is used. You can learn to visualise ...


1

Yes, the "Warsaw Concerto" is a piano concerto, and I have heard of high school students playing it as a graduation piece. It is very good for that purpose because it is short and sounds much more difficult to play than it actually is. For the same reasons, it is not likely to impress competition judges. It is very close to Edvard Grieg's piano concerto ...


3

As far as I know there has never been (and probably never will be) a legally binding definition of "piano concerto", or any similar musical term like "sonata", "symphony", etc. But a competition with a "piano concerto" as the final round would usually mean "a concerto that is part of the standard classical repertoire". Even if a 10-minute excerpt from a ...


0

You just have to "know" the piece. All of it! If there's any doubt, use the music. Plenty of soloists do.


9

I both memorize the accompaniment and know my "cues" and count. Ideally one would have the whole piece in one's head and just know/feel when to come in, but with the typical amount of rehearsal time available, it's often wise to count to be certain. You can also use a hybrid system. If you know a cue (an easy to recognize moment played by someone else) and ...


1

http://www.cstreetbrass.com/ 2 trumpets; http://www.mnozilbrass.at/en/ 3 trumpets You're really only limited by the arrangements.. and even then you could easily double on parts.


0

So sorry, but you can't. NOTHING in the world sounds like a B-3+Leslie. I have heard ALL the so-called "electronic" and "digital" fakers, and anyone who cannot pick out a fake either is not a musician, has no ear, or simply is uninformed about a real, live B-3+Leslie sound. You might get "close" and that may be good enough for you, but don't fool ...


1

Over the years I have performed at hundreds of events and understand how important a set list is. Here are a few tips I've learnt when writing them. • Always include a few songs the audience might know. • Always have a mixture of tempos, slow, medium and fast. • A mixture of rhythms. • Alternate the keys, don't have three songs in D minor in a row. • If ...



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