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3

My essential list of organisations to belong to as a musician in the UK includes the PRS and PPL (in order to be paid royalties) and the Musician's Union. The MU provides me not only with instrument insurance as Tim mentioned, but also: £1million public liability insurance (quite important to a band with pyro...) legal and contract advice free hearing ...


2

Don't know about other countries, but in U.K. there's the Musicians' Union. As a member, I was entitled to £2,000 of instrument insurance, topped up if necessary, which was a nice thing to have. The M.U. habitually chased up promoters who still owed money for performances, and warned against bad promoters. On occasions, I could get a pro-forma for contracts ...


11

Baroque music was all about expressiveness, and the rhythm was not necessarily meant to be held as strictly as the Renaissance tactus. Wheat Williams has mentioned historically informed performance, and as he says, these things are debated academically. But there is some good indication that Baroque composers did think of slowing down at the end of pieces. ...


9

Wheat Williams covered the basics of historically-informed-performance quite well. I want to add that unmeasured preludes (not uncommon in Baroque music) indicate that Baroque composers did have a concept of give-and-take in regards to tempo. (You can look at examples of preludes here or here to see what the music looked like.) So, while the purists may ...


5

"Historically informed" practitioners will tell you all kinds of stuff overgeneralized from a narrow modern point of view. For example, that dynamics in keyboards are a modern invention. Clavichords were perfectly capable of nuanced dynamic play, and larger instruments like harpsichords had several manuals and registration possibilities in order to allow ...


18

Questions like this cause endless debate among scholars. The basic fact is that sheet music from the Baroque era tends to have a great deal less detail and specificity about interpretive matters than sheet music written in later eras. Bowing directions for strings are never given; the only dynamic markings used are often just "p" and "f", and there are no ...


1

Here is an interesting quote as to why Jimi Hendrix destroyed one of his guitars by setting it on fire. It may shed some light on why rockers destroy there instruments. Distinguishing yourself in the colorful musical climate of 1967 wasn’t easy. Merely being one of the most innovative and exciting musicians to ever play the guitar wasn’t enough. Jimi ...


4

Well - the term "Stunt Guitarist" could be used to describe guitarist who can be seen live or in many YouTube video's doing things like playing the guitar behind their back, with their toes, using finger tapping to play both necks of a double neck at the same time and using their guitar as a drum while playing it as a guitar at the same time. Playing ...



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