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-1

how you fix it: Start playing the drums. You'll develop rhythm pretty quick. You should be able to feel the phrases coming and going. Drummers know how to time based on 32nd notes for pretty good accuracy. I began my musical journey with drums, and everything else was easy to grasp after that. Not saying everything was easy, because it's not, but timing ...


1

The problem could easily lie with either the way the musicians are playing the music or your inability to hear it and yourself clearly in the monitors. It may have nothing to do with your ability to keep tempo at all. Many very talented and gifted vocalist who can sing karaoke or with a backing track they practice with, do just fine - until they try to ...


0

Suzanne I have experience with this problem, and a suggestion. Center your awareness of tempo not in your toes, and not in your thinking process but squarely in your pelvis. In rehearsal, take time to affirmatively relax your body, taking care to concentrate on your jaw and, to put it delicately, the place where you sit down. Nice and relaxed. If you ...


2

Can you read music, or, more importantly do you know the rhythm that you are trying to sing and that is tripping you up? that is to say, do you understand what is going on rhythmically? From my experience as a teacher when students struggle with this it is because they do not understand parts of the rhythm that they cannot feel "naturally." So, if you ...


0

I started singing for my kids before they come to life. Now they are 3 and 5 and both can sing amazingly in tune. Audiation for sure develops at an early age and it is an improtant tool to have as a musician. I would not say beginning to play early is the key for music success, but beginning to be a musician early for sure it is (not by playing an ...


2

Well, correlation and causation may strike again. Yes, there are plentiful examples of child prodigies growing into renowned composers. However, I never heard of a renowned composer with a childhood history of being forced to play some instrument regularly. Those musicians became what they were because you'd have had a hard time to force them away from ...


-2

I think it is pretty safe to say that starting anything at a young age and sticking with it would lead to a higher level of proficiency later in life than if you spent the same amount of time but started later in life. This should not discourage you, however. There are plenty of examples of musicians that started later in life that went on to reach an ...


2

I see in the comments that you are already familiar with the polar patterns. For the readers that don't know them, here they are: Polar pattern: A microphone's directionality or polar pattern indicates how sensitive it is to sounds arriving at different angles about its central axis. Simply put, from which directions the microphone is capturing sound. ...


2

The 57/58 is a standard stage mic with good reason - durable, dependable, relatively inexpensive, and cardioid enough for the average volume singer. My primary reason for going with tighter patterns is if the singer sings softly and is fronting a band. Typically what happens with the standard cardioid in this case is that the singer can't hear herself and ...


1

It's all explained very clearly here: Heil sound website A hypercardioid is more directional, so although it may allow you to have your monitors a bit MORE too loud :-) you need better mic technique. And the rear lobe means a floor wedge monitor shouldn't be placed directly behind the mic, but over a bit.


0

I also have huge stage fright and frequently will second-guess myself. However, to prepare for my recital, I took a class whose point is to perform every week, and I forced myself to make appointments with friends so they could hear me playing. That helped a lot, so when the final recital came, yes, I was nervous, my adrenaline was up, but I had experienced ...


1

What you're asking about is called Live Looping. The most common way of achieving this (that I have seen) is to use a dedicated looping pedal. Manufacturers such as Boss, TC Electronic, and Electro-Harmonix have a range of options available. If you're set on using an iPad, the most popular app seems to be Loopy. You'll also need a way to get audio cleanly ...


1

Personally, the record button always made me play better. As I was never trained or took lessons, it would keep me from trying to do fancy stuff and just do it right, the easy way. You don't feel it when you use your phone because you would (hopefully) never make someone else suffer through that horrible sound quality, nor will it ever be a 'release', but ...


0

Do you have the music/lyrics in front of you in a convenient format? If you are trying to perform it all from memory, I think that needlessly gives additional difficulty to what you are trying to do. As a non-musical, real-life analogy, many years ago when I first needed to leave voicemails I would run into similar performance anxiety. I dealt with it my ...


5

Notwithstanding the other answers, which as of this date, are all sound advice [no pun intended], so I shan't repeat anything already mentioned. First of all… Red-light fever is a real, but purely psychological, effect. The only way to get over it is to get over it. Some things that may help… or not... Take off the headphones. If you're monitoring the ...


24

Well, ok, I see what you're saying. Keep that record button down all the time then. If that makes you suck all the time, then so be it. Suck and slowly improve. If your music is only being listened to by you, how do you really know it's any good to begin with? You can't judge yourself while practicing. That's a skewed view. You have to judge yourself ...


3

I know you said that you do most of this, but I will say it anyway. The key is making it routine and even boring. Do it (record yourself) every day until you forget what the problem is you are trying to solve. Make it part of your practice. Record things you do not plan to record or listen to again ever. Don't listen to them for a couple weeks, at first. The ...


3

I have/had (no clue if it still happens) The same issue, it's all about your subconcious need to do it perfectly. When you don't care and just do it you just do it, as soon as there's a hint that you'r monitored ... boom. My advice is just keep recording yourself and it'll wear out with time. I have the impression that that's what did it for me. I guess it ...


0

I agree with a lot of what was said above. Know your music. If possible have the music with you, not always but at first. You may not read it, because of the lights but it centers. Choirs have it and orchestras too. I would prefer just going by heart, that will come. Unless it is one of my compositions then I can create as I go. warm up your voice before ...



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