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A harmony is just a tune that accents a melody. It's actually pretty simple beyond self esteem but with any note, you have a range of notes that can be played to accent that note, mathematically, or basically by ear. A note that is not mathematically correct will simply sound sour, which some musicians still use. A harmony is normally a way of wrapping ...


0

Yes there should be some. Just keep in mind that you always concentrate on the client selection and importance of the ceremony for which you have been hired. For more detail please feel free to take a look at mildjs(dot)com


1

I have no numbers to back this up, but I think we are skewing the statistics by looking at adult players who started playing young. It is self-evident that a 49 year old violinist who has been practicing since she was 5 will have practiced a lot more than a 49 year old violinist who started when she was 45. And (although I'm no psychologist) I imagine that ...


2

Malcolm Gladwell's book Outliers goes into this topic quite deeply. It's an excellent read and this piece and his other works might provide you the answers you are looking for. Here's the gist: musician who began playing/practicing at a younger age obviously have more time behind their perspective instruments. Malcolm Gladwell believes in the "10,000-hour" ...


8

This answer is based on a lecture from Manfred Spitzer, a german psychologist and university teacher. He said that for example the part of the brain which controlls the left hand is significantly larger in the brain of musicians (in this special case violinists) which started practising in a very early age than in the brain of non-musicians or violinists ...


2

Only the more expensive studio condensers and some live performance mics have good built in pop filters. Some vocalists don't have a big problems with plosives, but others like myself do. The built in pop filter on the SM58 is hardly sufficient - you can cut a piece of carbon fiber (about the size of a silver dollar), unscrew the mic grill - and push it up ...


3

I can't answer whether there's an advantage psychologically, or whether there's something about being 5 that means you learn more quickly than when you're say 20. But there are circumstantial advantages : I learnt to play guitar at around 19-20. I became what most people thought was "pretty good" quite quickly. The reason : obsession. It was a summer ...


4

It's an open question, and it will likely be a long time before there's a concensus. But given that there's a lot of interest in this, and that there are precious few poster childs for the unlimited human potential side, I at least is firmly in the "incontestable advantage" camp. Given the vast amount of people in the world, and their differing ...


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The extremely obvious answer is yes. Musicianship is practice and the earlier a person starts playing the more years of practice they will have under their belts. More to the point of your question. I started drumming at the age of 7 and rhythm is now second nature to me. I don't even think about it. Rhythm to me is like a sixth sense. I know a few drummers ...


2

I don't have a source handy, but I believe that whole "impressionable age" (or whatever it was called) theory has been debunked. There is no cutoff age after which learning is any harder. However, I do believe there is a psychological factor that shapes confidence and comfort, and I'll use myself as the explanatory example: I started piano at age 4, young ...


21

I'm reminded of what my mother once told me. Music is not competition. Leave the racing to the horses. Having taught children myself and having lived in a house of teachers for 22 years I can tell you sometimes it is refreshing to be able to talk to your pupil like an adult. You are constantly running the proverbial mine field when trying to teach children. ...


1

The most common way to power busking equipment is to use a deep-cycle marine battery and an inverter for the voltage and current you want to run at. The article below also discusses almost-silent gas-powered generators, which are pricey. If your keyboard takes batteries and doesn't eat them too quickly, then you might consider using rechargeable batteries ...


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It seems as if everyone so far has covered the basics. The fact of the matter is it really is personal preference. EVERY drum kit has a different feel to it; no matter how you set it up. If you don't mind playing on many different sets and are able to adapt, then by all means use the one the venue provides. However, if you like the feel of your personal ...


1

To save me hauling round the full kit, when I saw a child's kit in a second-hand store for 50 quid/bucks/shekels, I jumped at the chance. With some judicious damping & tuning (they are all non-standard sizes so I can never change the skins) I have a perfectly serviceable kit that I can use in any small venue. Add my own stool, kick pedal, hats & ...


0

Okay, I now know how to do this, although it will take me some time to implement. This case is for having an acoustic drummer set the tempo on the RC 300. First, get an piezoelectric acoustic drum trigger and mount it on the snare rim. Second, hook the drum trigger up to a midi percussion module with a midi out that has configurable midi messages. Third, ...


4

For venues without a kit, the absolute minimum would be snare, bass drum and hi-hat. That's the overwhelming majority of venues in my area. Hi-hat can operate as a poor man's cymbals in a pinch. For venues with a basic backline kit, all you'll need is your sticks and bass drum pedal, although you will probably prefer your own cymbals. Some folks will ...


5

Venues, like rehearsal studios, generally provide kick, a couple of toms, hi-hat and snare. Most drummers prefer their own snare, and cymbals, and often that includes their own hi-hat cymbals. A comfy seat is a personal choice too ! So, you could get away with those if you were sure of a 'back line' kit. Not expecting any kit on site, a kick drum, snare, ...



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