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Sorry for the late answer - I hope you don't mind. I wholeheartedly agree with Tim's answer; playing with other musicians is undoubtedly the best way to improve. Since you mentioned you are expanding your technical repertoire, I would advice practising the rudiments in a musical context. Try playing beats around the rudiments (for example a simple paradiddle ...


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If you go with no cab you probably want a speaker simulation method in addition to having a line out and a load box to compensate for no load on the head. I personally prefer the actual tone of a cabinet over a sim, mostly because of the warmth and compression. I would try both out, especially since there are great options both ways. Since you mentioned ...


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It's not easy to say which is "better", but they will definitely be different. First, if you go straight from a tube head to the PA, you'll need some way to match the output of the head to one of the PA's inputs, and you'll want to simulate the sound of a guitar speaker cabinet. A good way to do this for a tube head is with a speaker simulator and a passive ...


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I play Piano but it is a very similar thing with coordinating each hand differently. The trick is not to think of each limb playing its own part but instead to think of it as all four limbs playing one part. Don't play the bass drum with your left foot and the snare with your right hand, play the drum kit with your body. Like typing on a computer keyboard. ...


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To echo what Faza wrote, it depends on the conductor, as I saw a lecture of Benjamin Zander "it is the conductor which brings out the best of the players".


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I play the violin an piano (no drums), but I find that the better I know a piece, the easier it is to play it well in front of people. If I have practised a piece a great amount, I will generally be less stressed when playing in front of audiences as I know that it probably won't go wrong; there is no reason for it to do so since I have already played it ...


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Apart from the obvious practice for and by yourself; get out and play with as many different musos as possible - different instruments, different genres, different styles, different experiences (beginners to seasoned players), different venues (from small cosy clubs to arenas- if you make the chance). You maybe only play one or two styles, so doing these ...


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In the USA, orchestra musicians belong to the American Federation of Musicians as a matter of course. The AFM is location-based and oriented towards professionals such as studio, show and classical musicians. Other musicians can join AFM Local 1000. Check out the website for the benefits.



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