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13

Your big hands are not some imaginary pair of generic big hands. Like any other new guitar purchaser, you're going to have to go try some guitars and find one (or more) that feels right to you. There is no one true answer here. Get out there and put your hands on some guitars. Don't limit yourself to what you think you want or what someone else has told ...


12

Inflammation. What inflammation is is the engorgement of tissue with blood in response to that issue releasing a signaling chemical (histamine) that dilates blood vessels. That is why inflamed tissue is redder than usual. Theory is that the body has this response to rush additional white blood cells to the site of a lesion. (An allergic reaction is one ...


9

I had a classical guitar teacher give me an exercise for this, because I was experiencing tendonitis in my whole left hand. The problem is that over the years I had gradually developed a habit of squeezing down much too hard in fretting notes. Her exercise was this: Grab a chord that uses all four left-hand fingers and fret it like you normally would. Now, ...


8

The idea is really more that you shouldn't be tensing your neck muscles when singing high notes or depressing the larynx when singing low notes. It's going to move in either case, so that's why we watch it as an indicator of bad technique. So, when singing high notes, instead of focusing so much on the larynx, try to become aware of the muscles in your ...


7

Advantages of big hands - potentially your reach, although this depends on whether your fingers are long, or just big. And for guitars with wide necks big hands can help. Disadvantages of big hands - you might find it tricky to play certain chords high up the neck if you can't get your fingers into a small space. Realistically though, I have seen people ...


6

Josef Hofmann is a good bet. He had such small hands that he actually had pianos custom-made with smaller keys. I can't find any direct references to his compositions being easy to play with small hands, but I doubt he would compose something he couldn't play. Another aspect to look at is players with small hands, and what they have played. Harriet Cohen ...


6

Something my teacher regularly had me do with difficult sections was to play it all stacatto. Slow it down and focus on perfect timing while you do this, then gradually increase the tempo. Don't increase it further than you can play while still keeping the timing perfect. Do this every practice session until your speed is relatively close to the speed you ...


6

Nowadays I always get a close shave before playing the tuba in a gig. I started doing this when I realized that after longer breaks from playing I had trouble getting a distinct attack and tone when I had facial hair around the lips. I also had trouble playing pedal-notes. I then experienced getting a close shave as "gaining" one or two weeks of practice, ...


6

As far as I know, the experts say this all has to do with psychology, sensory perception and cognition, and not physiology. This is a question about the intersection of psychology and music, and even the discipline known as "music therapy". There has been a lot of research done on this sort of thing in recent years and a lot of books published on it, but ...


6

I'm unsure what to make of the pain you're describing. I've encountered a similar problem attempting to play a piece with a similar technical challenge, but I never felt pain in the wrist joint; rather, the muscles in my forearm were very fatigued. I assume that's what you were describing. That fire is lactic acid building up in your forearm muscles, which ...


6

I found an answer to my question here: Our voices tend to sound lower when we first wake up for three reasons. First, fluids collect in the tissues of the throat while we sleep. It’s the same temporary phenomenon that makes our eyes look puffy when we first wake up. Second, mucous builds up overnight from lack of use. And third, our vocal chords dry out ...


5

On violin, it helps to practice entire passages in swing (dotted followed by half value) and reverse swing (half value followed by dotted). This lets you practice playing every other note in quick succession as well as in isolation. I think the same practice technique should work for piano too. To play quickly doesn't mean to play each note quickly so much ...


5

If your shoulder (or anything else) hurts after playing sessions, your playing is ergonomically poor. Keep your posture erect, keep your arms relaxed and loose at your sides, and don't raise your elbows. Make sure your seat is at the correct height. Watch out for tension while you are playing and work on allowing your body to release it. To improve scales ...


5

Well, the tiny hairlike structures in your cochlea transmit impulses through the vestibocochlear cranial nerve to your cerebral cortex, then some stuff happens that we don't fully understand yet, but you experience it as sound and link it emotionally to similar experiences in your past. The only real exception I can think of is if the music you are listening ...


5

My personal opinion: In my 35 years of experience in singing, what I have observed is that every individual is unique. Some quite small people sing with a huge voice, and some quite large people have small voices. On average, perhaps, there might be a correlation between the mass of the person and the size of the voice, but I think this is largely ...


5

In consideration of your question, I came across extensive blogs on vocal pedagogy by Ian Howell, a professional countertenor and educator in Boston. Since I'm not familiar with his work, I cannot tell you whether his writings are authoritative or not, but he has written extensively on the physiology of the countertenor voice and what is being done with the ...


4

Calloused or not, you're putting a lot of pressure on a very small area of your skin. this will cause some tissue damage (minor, of course), which your body will then send more blood to in order to repair. This slight swelling can sometimes put pressure on the very sensitive nerves in your fingertips. It's nothing to be terribly worried about. It is a sign ...


4

This is by far one of my favorite music texts on that subject precisely: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/This_Is_Your_Brain_On_Music


4

There's a slight change in exhausted air. When throat is cold, somewhat colder exhausted air becomes densier and that may be a subject of a slight pitch change. There is another question if this change can be audible. If it is, I think it would be momentary- cold / hot throat quickly changes its temperature to natural body's temperature level.


4

It would be very useful to see a singing teacher who will help you with your entire posture and body use as well as specific techniques for the obvious areas. Many singers also take lessons in the Alexander Technique, which I did for several years. This technique helps the old, bad habits just fall away and you learn to fall into a neutral, balanced position ...


4

For fast runs, you have to rely on muscle memory; you have to become "unconsciously competent". For simple fast runs, play it very(!) slow and very(!) loud (but not hammering) with only the hand doing the run. This strengthens your fingers and builds muscle memory. After playing a fast run two or three times with this technique, try playing it very quiet ...


4

To make runs "sound right", you need to respect the phrasing. Just because something is played fast doesn't mean that you can't play with dynamics (obviously). So when you're working with the runs, really look at them, and see if adding a swell, or "leaning into" a beat will make it sound more coherent. If you have no idea where to start, pick a beat to ...


4

On average, taller people have lower voices because of longer throat and vocal chords, just like taller people have larger hands on average. When people get fatter or thinner, it often causes changes in their voice tone and may make a slight difference in range. The same thing is true of aerobic conditioning. Of course, vocal practice will likely make more ...


4

The actual mechanics of the act of singing in a falsetto voice should be understood for starters. This article delves into the specifics: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falsetto A reputable voice teacher would the wisest choice to develop a falsetto voice while minimizing strain or damage to the vocal chords. To better understand vocal chord structure ...


4

I think a simple solution would be to switch hands. Take a left handed guitar* and play like that. The two webbed fingers won't be an issue if you use them to hold a pick. If you've never learned guitar before, it would be easier to learn to play a left handed guitar. If you had gotten used to playing the guitar, changing to a left handed guitar would be a ...


4

First, accept that you have a handicap and will never be able to play guitar 'normally'. Embrace it, don't try to play like everyone else, and you'll be a far better guitarist for it. I would recommend learning to play with alternative tunings, especially open tunings or all 5ths. It will make many chord fingerings far more simple for getting started, and ...


3

So I had a lot of trouble with this myself, and the problem that I faced is that Through ears of not being knowledgeable of how i produce tone, I was trying to form notes improperly. Notes are produced by the speed of vibrations in the air. and there are two basic ways this is done in music. lets look at other instruments to explain. There are string ...


3

I'm a Jazz pianist, and also have rather small hands. If you're playing Jazz, your hand-size doesn't really matter when you're choosing a song to learn, as your hand-size will only affect your interpretation of a given song. For instance, when I'm playing bebop, I wish I could play tall shell-voicings in the left hand like Bud Powell; since I usually can't ...


3

The radius and profile of the neck, and width of the fingerboard can make a big difference in the feel for different sized hands. I have long hands - my palm and fingers are long, so I favor a wider fingerboard and a thinner profile neck. Ray Benson, the lead guitarist for Asleep At The Wheel, has big hands, and Guitar Player Magazine interviewed him years ...



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