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20

Can't tell you what sort of pieces in what order - that's partly down to intuition on the night: reading audience reaction (or not!) and doing more of the same or not as the case may be. But, segueing is not that difficult. Sometimes a number needs to come to a proper end, but since it's background stuff, what I do is try to keep the music going, by either ...


17

Depends on what you mean by "may be able". Different instruments and music styles and instruments and practice material pose different hurdles and motivation for different people. That's not specific to playing music but any skill. The less discipline you have, the more you are dependent on upcoming hurdles and short-time rewards matching your current ...


15

That means on the first and third repeats, play piano (quietly), on the second repeat, play forte (loudly).


14

May I suggest that it is not an 'x' per se, but actually two lines clarifying the voice leading for the top voices. Such lines are found in the first two bars as well.


13

It is not necessary to double the root when converting guitar chords to piano chords but it could be done if fits better with the music. But there are important distinctions between the guitar and piano that come into play when considering how to notate chords on sheet music. These distinctions center around (and are affected by) the way chords are played ...


11

Basically, yes - callouses are your body's protection against damage (that it could incur from pressing hard on the strings, which cut into your flesh) As you become more proficient, you will learn how to press only as hard as is needed, and no more - this will help a lot, but you will still have harder pads on your fingertips. Nylon strung guitars ...


9

Welcome to the wonderful world of guitar. The guitar is a very versatile and portable instrument that you can enjoy anywhere you like. As you have discovered, fretted (or non fretted) stringed instruments such as guitar, ukulele. mandolin, or even violin, are very different from a keyboard instrument. With a piano, there is only one specific key per ...


9

If you have the option of an intrinsically easier piece that will teach them the same things, that's definitely a fine choice. However, yes I do believe that you are worrying too much. Playing different styles and arrangements of the same song is something I've always enjoyed doing, and I think it's actually beneficial. Something about the contrast allows ...


9

If you have the drive and dedication to get over the initial awkward and difficult learning curve then I don't see why you can't play any instrument you want. When I first started guitar at the age of 15 I played for probably about 3 weeks or so and then "quit" because I was getting so frustrated and felt like I'd never be able to get it. After about 3 ...


7

The first obvious (and therefore not really helpful ha) suggestion: Experiment. If you're having trouble with a section, play around with a couple different ways of doing it, even try things that seem unintuitive or "wrong", you may be surprised by something. But now for the real tips: Think in phrases. First read through the whole piece, and gain an ...


7

It is more commonly called "forearm rotation" because the forearm is what does the work, not the hand. The basic concept is that instead of doing all the work of playing by raising and lowering your fingers with your hand still, you rotate your forearm "inwards" (so your thumb moves down as your hand rotates) to help play a note with your thumb, and the ...


7

Part of the problem is that beginners are trying to learn at least three different things at the same time: How to read sheet music How to play their instrument How to play the specific piece that is in front of them. If you concentrate mostly on #3, then learning #1 and #2 will be slower, and (relatively) unstructured and disorganized. You need to work ...


7

Some people's calluses seem to be semi-permanent, but others will quickly lose them after a period without playing. There is some related discussion here. However, your concern about tone on the piano is unfounded. Piano keys are not so sensitive that the toughness of your skin is a factor; you have to depress them far more than your finger pads would ...


6

Remember what your basic function is here - you are being paid (I presume!) to provide "elevator music", not play a concert. If you do something that makes the conversation fall silent because everybody is listening to you, that's bad. Therefore, start with something bland and unchallenging to listen to. The room will most likely fall silent when you start ...


6

Your third question is a matter of opinion and can't be answered here. Pretty much the same with your second question. I'm pretty sure everyone would agree that the answer to the first question is "Yes". You should pay attention to the brightness, but how bright it should be is a matter of personal taste. Important note: Pretty much all pianos get brighter ...


5

In that age it is most important, that your child has fun playing the piece, so it will actually like to play it. There is no special value in the "original" version for a child, and pieces come in lots of variants (instrumentation, transposition, arrangement, ...). I would more expect, that after some time having made technical progress the child will be ...


5

At my wedding we hired a pianist to play for the entire dinner and reception. The problem was that while my wife and I had a few songs we wanted to hear, we had no where near a list to fill the 6 hour span. The pianist was very nice, and explained that what he would do is work our music in, with some similar stuff, but that the bulk of it would come from ...


4

Standard sheet music specifies the octaves quite precisely. The lowest line in the treble clef, for example, is E4 (the E in the fourth octave): Ledger lines can also be added above and below the staves to extend their range, and you might sometimes see 8va written above or below certain notes to indicate that they should be played an octave higher or ...


4

I have a similar background, and in my experience, there simply isn't a good transition or analog from piano to guitar. Whereas a child can learn to identify every B-flat on the piano in an afternoon, it takes weeks or months of practice to know the notes on the fretboard. It's an entirely different system. I would like to suggest a few approaches / ideas I ...


4

If you play CEGC, it won't be parallel eighths. It will simply have the octave doubled. In order to have parallel eighths, you have to have the voices move. If you take guitar chords and put them into sheet music for piano, should you double the root ? There isn't any definite answer here. You certainly have to option to easily double the root (C). So, ...


3

The are scale shapes. The help to memorize notes on fretboard. The every scale has multiple positions. The most popular are vertical patterns but there are others This is very popular minor pentatonic scale shape diagram It will be never so easy to play them as it was on keyboard but you will get used to it. The most beneficial thing you can do on guitar ...


3

My response might be more abstract than what you are looking for, but I think it's ultimately a healthier mentality. I've included a more concrete example of its implementation at the end. In my opinion, approaching music with a 'lick'-based mentality tends to limit your ability to be open and interactive with yourself and the ensemble/band. I find if more ...


3

The sustain pedal can also be used (on a real piano) for a muting effect. You strike a chord, release the keys, and a split second after you release the keys you depress the sustain pedal. If done well, this produces a sforzando effect: the chord is initially loud but then echos on quietly. Takes practice.


3

On a normal piano, the left pedal is pressed to make the sound quieter. It does this by moving the whole hammer mechanism closer to the strings on most uprights, and often by moving the mechanism to one side on grands. thus it's less distance for the strike to take place. On some pianos, there is a practice pedal, often the middle of three, which brings a ...


3

If you listen to the recording, the melody voice in bars 88-89 really goes f f f g g g ees c' | g ...; this is probably a way how the author wanted to present this fact, using voice/staff switching lines. It would have been actually better to use the proper notation of the leading voice:


3

As far as I know there has never been (and probably never will be) a legally binding definition of "piano concerto", or any similar musical term like "sonata", "symphony", etc. But a competition with a "piano concerto" as the final round would usually mean "a concerto that is part of the standard classical repertoire". Even if a 10-minute excerpt from a ...


3

If you don't mind some dissonance in your sound repertoire, I'd recommend Bartok's Mikrokosmos as your learning tool. It is the only progressive piano method written by a compositional genius. It will introduce you to a huge range of piano textures and sounds. And it gets quite difficult. By the time you are through with Volume 6, you have the technique to ...


3

The way I approach polyrhythms is this: I break them down much as you do, in terms of their lowest common denominator, but I try to memorize the sound of the pattern right away and not rely on seeing it graphically. At UC we learned an example for two against three: "FARMS in BERkeley". I then practice it in many different ways- tapping the two parts with ...


3

You should really ask the listeners. But ask with the piano. As an example, you might start with the first few bars of Moonlight Sonata. If nobody reacts (looks at you with either approval or disappointment) then keep going. If you see any positive reactions, continue onto the second movement. Negative reactions, segue into something else. And specifically ...


3

You played piano for a fairly extensive length of time, and reached a fairly high level of playing (Inventions aren't the easiest thing to play), so you would probably jump back into it fairly quickly. The muscle memory from playing never completely disappears, so with consistent (and productive) practice, you could easily reach the skill level you were at, ...



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