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28

Wrong reps create wrong results. DO NOT play fast and wrong. Practice as slowly as you need to to avoid wrong notes. This is very important. The reason that you need to practice in the first place is that you need to create muscle memory. If you tell your muscles to do the wrong thing they will remember to do the wrong thing. Every instance of ...


24

In a key where there are already some sharps (or flats) in the key sig., as here, every time one of those notes is played, it has to be sharp (or flat). In E, or C#m, the key here, every other note is natural - E, A, and B. So if a note sounding like a C needs to be played, it can't just be written as a C, because the player would automatically sharpen it, ...


13

I've had about five different teachers over my career as an instrumentalist, and they all taught me to play slowly when I was learning a new passage. The objective has always been to play it as slowly as necessary in order to play it smoothly and without error. In doing so, it will naturally become easier to play it faster later. I believe that playing it ...


12

The note is the same key as C. It is written as B# instead of "C natural" to indicate note's "role" according to rules of classical (musical) harmony. My guess is this portion of musical piece is written in Cis-moll, and the arrpegio being played is dominant chord (G# B# D# F#). Because in minor tonalities Dominant chord always has VIIth tone (B is VIIth ...


12

Yes a B# is just a C, but it is written that way because that note is function like a "B" instead of a "C". If you look at the notes you have G#, B#, and F#. Look familiar? It's a G# dominant 7th (5th is omitted, but thats not unheard of). A more focused question on this idea can be seen in this question as to why notes get alternative names.


10

Just a few ideas: A keyboard instrument provides a lot more freedom in terms of the number of notes that can be sounded together and the distance between them. It's difficult on a guitar to play a fluidly moving bassline and a chord pattern two octaves above; it's trivial on a piano. The sustain mechanism of a piano allows for all notes to sustain at once; ...


9

If you play fast and sloppy and "get in more reps", your sloppiness will tend to accumulate in the same places. There will be stuff you always play wrong in similar ways. And you'll get desensitivized to playing it wrong, to boot. You'll feel that it's ok to make the same mistakes over again and again if you are just making them fast enough. "more reps" ...


8

The wavy vertical lines to the left of the chords mean "arpeggio": in other words, you are being told to roll the chords. Given that both both passages have Ped indications (the lines and carets under the bass stave in the first excerpt), you aren't obliged to hold the notes with your fingers, so you can indeed cross hands in the first passage. (Edit: To ...


7

If it was written as C, it would be actually C# ... because you have four sharps on left (those ####) and they basically mean that: F = F# G = G# C = C# D = D# Which is E major. Instead, they write it as B# because they want you to play actual C. It could be also written as a C with a natural sign ♮ ... the natural sign would "cancel out" the sharp # on ...


7

These groups of multiple notes are called chords. It does in fact mean to play all the notes at the same time. The notes you pictured appear to be notation for piano. The two staffs pictured are the treble and bass staffs. The notes on the lower staff are played with the left hand and the upper staff notes are played with the right hand. And yes, ...


6

I will aim at the original question: How to play things on a shorter keyboard. The positioning of the keys for various sizes of the keybed is the following (click to enlarge): (Note that some 73 or 76 keyboards can be slightly shifted.the) That's how you should position your music on the keyboard. The red key is "the middle C" (I made it C3 here, but it's ...


6

If you are playing an organ sound, you might want a keyboard that can feel and respond like an organ, rather than a piano It's possible to make a very shallow non-weighted action, which is helpful for some techniques (I like it better for triggering percussive sounds, for example) It's cheaper to make, so instruments are cheaper. The instrument is ...


5

I would just like to clarify a couple things that I don't think have been fully articulated. First is that there is a distinction to be understood between the concepts of "note" and "pitch". A note is a symbol in a score. It represents a pitch to be sounded. Enharmonic equivalence is idea that the same pitch can be represented by different note names. ...


5

I usually use this chord as an upper structure of a D13(b9) chord: (D) C Eb F# B Used in that way, it is an altered dominant chord. It could also be the upper structure of an Ab7(#9) chord: (Ab) C Eb Gb B Of course, this is also an altered dominant chord. But it can also function as a chord in its own right, i.e. not only as an upper structure. In that ...


5

The other answer didn't explain exactly, but in the first case, you're supposed to cross over and play the top note with your left hand. So you roll the LH chord, then continue the roll into the RH, and finally cross over and play the top note with your left hand. The pedal will keep everything sounding. The second example is just a simple one-handed ...


4

It's way better to know (not memorize) what notes each scale is made of. A song won't tell you what scale you are playing in a passage, but it is typical that a passage comes directly from some scale and sometimes multiple if the song modulates to different keys. Being able to identify these patterns will help your playing immensely. Also note that on the ...


4

Add disclaimer Some people apparently couldn't understand what I was getting at with this answer, or don't understand humour or whatever, and therefore flagged the answer. I assure you that any misspellings found here are entirely enharmonic in nature, and thus don't matter. Or do they? If you think so, you've got the point I'm making. It is knot a C. ...


4

Human minds, to a degree, learn by repeating. Yes, there are other methods that we use to learn, but undeniably, the more times most peolple do something, the deeper it gets embedded in their brain. So - if one repeats something numerous times, and makes the same errors each time, that gets 'learned'. Consider making a journey. if you ge the same way several ...


4

Take our time and practice slowly 80 to 90% of the time. Play it carefully and correctly. With that careful practice under your belt, also practice at a moderate and overly fast pace to give your muscles some different work 5-10% of the time. When performing, exercise caution and try to hold back on your speed at least a little. When we are performing, ...


4

I don't know if you mean Alfred's piano books, but those are the ones that I use with my students. If you're not using Alfred's you might have a look. There are some sample PDF pages. Mikrokosmos is a great series, if you like Bartok. Getting students to play the pieces if they don't like Bartok is more trouble than it's worth. Fingering is a flexible ...


4

Assuming that your teacher isn't terrible, she probably isn't giving you 'randoms' - she's probably trying to go through a progression of work that builds up your technique, and she's naturally reluctant for you to jump ahead and learn bad habits. Having said that, there's everything to gain in music by not having just one perspective, so if you are itching ...


4

One really good way to practice is to play only two or four bars at a time and master them in progression instead of stumbling through the whole song repeatedly. Even though it is much less interesting when practicing, this method gives you opportunity to learn what mistakes you are making and correct them before muscle memory takes place and becomes much ...


4

You probably don't mean playing more efficiently or effectively. You mean practising more effectively. That has a more rigorous meaning: learning skills faster, without learning anti-skills (bad habits: "practice makes perfect" is not as true as "practice makes permanent"). The number of skills is enormous: steady tempo, accurate leaping to a note, ...


4

Being able to play one grade 4 piece does not mean you will be able to play all of them. The C minor prelude looks and sounds harder than it actually is, in my opinion (as someone who has learned to play the piece). I would say the overall difficulty level between the two is comparable, although as Dr Mayhem commented, the pieces do very different things ...


3

It's nothing whatsoever to do with imaginary problems in writing a C natural! It's about spelling a major 3rd above G# correctly, and making the interval LOOK like a 3rd, not a 4th.


3

That looks like C# minor which gets its leading tone (B) raised by a semitone. You are correct in thinking that B# and C are played at the same place but for the purposes of music theory they are not the same notes. They are what is called enharmonic equivalents ie two notes with different names played at the same place.


3

My bet is on the 8vb only applying to the left hand. The A1 in the left hand is supposed to be held, and if the right hand would then play another A1, this would disrupt the holding of the left hand A1. While this kind of disruption for voice-leading purposes is not rare in piano music, in this instance it would cause an imbalance in the decay of the ...


3

"Just for fun or getting feedback" -- don't attempt to mic the vocal and the piano separately. Mic the room. This is the only easy way to get a natural sounding recording. If you close-mic any instrument, you'll get a recording without any of the natural effects added by the room, and you'd have to compensate with artificial reverb, EQ and so forth. Studio ...


3

You must not have heard of the Bösendorfer Imperial 290 piano, which has 9 extra notes lower than "A", for a total of 97 keys. The soundboard is 2.9 meters in length. It is a popular model in large churches and concert halls, but it is very expensive at around €150.000. It has been on the market for more than 100 years. The Bösendorfer company is in Vienna, ...


3

This is called a key change. The 7 sharps simply means that it's changing key from C major to C# major. Treat everything after the key change as if you're playing in C# major. So, when the key is still in C, you'd play no sharps or flats (unless noted by an accidental), and after the key change, if you see a C in the sheet music, you'd play a C#, if you see ...



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