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18

This question got me curious, so I started googling. Keyboard size is not officially standardized (there is no committee creating and enforcing standards), but in practice, there is very little variation. Browsing through forum topics on www.pianoworld.com, people measured 88 key keyboards from anywhere between 48 inches to 48 1/2". Wikipedia ...


9

As long as the question just says "C", then, in the treble clef, one ledger line below the staff, the third space in the staff and two ledger lines above the staff are all correct answers. There are ways to specify which one you want, for example a lot of people call middle C (one ledger line below the treble clef) C4, the third space in the staff C5 and two ...


8

The first thing to realize is that notation and performance are different in Baroque, Classical, and Romantic music. The Romantic rules apply to Beethoven and later composers. The small squiggle (two zigs and two zags) means three notes, the first on the note, the second on the note a step higher (the "auxiliary note"), and the third on the note again. On ...


8

While I see no reason to dispute the answers already presented I thought I would follow up with posting the measurements that I proposed in my comment under the question. Measuring several keys near middle C with a calibrated digital caliper: 1915 Steinway Model M (New York) with original action: 22.1 to 22. 9 mm (slight variance), +/- fractions of 0.86 ...


8

You didn't mention what instrument you're playing, but I would venture that you're doing it correctly, and that it takes awhile. I was still reaching new levels of mastery over the same basic scales for many years after I began. One thing that accelerated the process, beyond what you described, was practicing the scales in two ways: Imagine "C" is the ...


7

With practice, you'll eventually be able to listen to a passage of music a few times, recognise what the relationships between pitches are, and then notate it straight onto manuscript paper, but this skill takes time to develop. To start with, use an instrument to play along with the audio files, to help you work out the music. Piano is ideal for this, but ...


6

From the sound of it, it doesn't matter: if you can write both of them, then you already know what the exercise is testing. If only one is intended, my guess would be middle C (the one below the staff, in treble clef) and the octave going up from there, simply because that's generally what's taught first in piano.


6

The let-off on an acoustic piano is adjustable. Your tuner can show you how to do it. It determines how softly you can play. The answer to your question is: it depends on how the let-off is adjusted.


5

The fingers that are not playing can be elevated higher, out of the way, e.g. point your index finger upwards playing this chord, finger 3 can be extended too or relaxed. Fingers 4 & 5 need to be more clawed. When you lift your unused fingers like that, it gives you slightly more room. Can you touch your little finger and thumb together? Yes? See ...


5

TL;DR: Ab13sus4 There are always quite a few different ways to notate a particular set of pitches as a chord symbol. And, yes, this can get fairly ambiguous once you have a large number of pitches. In the end, I think it is always important to: try to explain a chord in the simplest way possible; use some common-sense (so, if there is some easily ...


4

Do other keyboard instruments have significantly different widths of keys? Organs seem to have the same key widths but I can't verify that. Accordions do vary - I can just reach a 10th on a piano but can easily get at least a 12th on an accordion.


4

The voicings possible for piano chords are not always easy to play on guitar. Sometimes they may not be possible at all. There is a simple reason for this. Piano chords are easy to play when the notes are close together, and become somewhat harder as the notes are further apart. Guitar chords, on the other hand, become harder to play, as the notes become ...


3

As you're left- handed, ( I seem to remember), your right hand isn't as dextrous as it needs to be. Practise more with stretching exercises, get a 'proper' piano, and - GET A TEACHER !! Seriously, you will have to play this combination with R.H. thumb on F#. You could even use one finger - pinky or ring to play C and D together. Not liked by some, and ...


3

From personal experience, I would say the problem is in using both the thumb and the fifth in such a small span. The black keys are simply thinner than white keys, but the thumb should sit pretty comfortably on one. I would not play it 2-4-5. I would play it 1-3-4, in fact. Practice something in E-flat major, to get used to striking the black keys, if you ...


3

As a complete beginner, I would recommend that you take at least a couple of lessons from a good teacher. I self-taught on guitar and bass but I had bad technique and ended up injuring my hands as a result, something that never happened to me when I learned piano from a teacher. If you can't get a teacher then here's a site that may help you avoid some of ...


3

7/8" appears to be the industry standard, but there is a slight (2 or 3%) difference occasionally.Some keyboards I think are slightly smaller, but can't access mine for a while, so can't measure.I'm not talking mini-boards here,which are made either for kiddies or for studio pro. use.Got a Yamaha keyboard here with 7/8" keys. I think the main differences, ...


3

That sequence reminds me of Chopin's Revolutionary Etude op. 10 No. 12. Thus Ascending: C G C D Eb G C D Eb G C D Eb 5 2 1 4 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 Descending: D C G Eb D C G Eb D C G 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 This may not be the only one answer so you can find lots of instruction on fingering of this piece.


3

You’ve only got so much focus to put towards playing an instrument, and when you try something new, it takes most of that focus. Right now, sitting up straight while playing involves a little extra focus, but trying something new involves a LOT of focus. It is likely that the more you do it, the easier sitting up straight will become. It will involve less ...


3

If you're referring to Ray Charles Swingova style, this is really a 2-3 clave rhythm that's done with a slight swing in some cases, i.e. the way the horns riff over that clave rhythm. I think what makes Ray unique here is the way that he swings the lead vocal over the 2-3 clave in the rhythm section as if the two are not really connected. It's subtly ...


3

This is another example where it's a culmination of finding a technique that works for you, and then sticking to a practice regime when you find one that works. One way I have found particularly useful, was using the circle of fifths as you said, and going one way round (i.e through the sharps) and then back the other way. Once I had this, I started doing it ...


2

An important way to improvise is to improvise on the melody by singing it. Loop the melody over and over on your music player and sing with it. Harmonize with it, figure out cute figures that fit the spaces in the music, stuff like that. Once you can improvise when you sing, then play just the chords of the music and sing along with that, improvising as ...


2

If you're experiencing pain after just starting, that's probably normal. Be sure not to push yourself too hard to really cause long term damage. I play bass guitar and I had some times where my left wrist would start killing me... this would hurt after playing, just throughout the day. I took about a 2 week break from playing and it really helped - ...


2

This answer is going to be a bit of a guess. I've noticed that when playing drums I have almost the opposite problem: when I'm playing, I'll sit up straight, but when I'm just sitting on the stool, waiting while the rest of the band faffs about, I'll often hunch down, resting my chin on my hands and my elbows on my knees or the rim of the snare drum. For ...


2

Do other keyboard instruments have significantly different widths of keys? I can speak from experience that melodica keys are significantly narrower than piano keys. Where I cannot comfortably reach more than an octave on a piano, I think my range is more like a 10th on the melodica. It was surprisingly tricky to reprogram my fingers for the shorter ...


2

A lot of the time, you won't be pressing the sustain pedal anyway. Yes, it sounds 'good', but you're already tiring of the novelty. Timing is all. Press the pedal AFTER you play a note/chord, and release your hand while the pedal's still down. When the next note is ready to be played, press that note, let pedal go, and press pedal again before lifting ...


2

I had no idea roll-up pianos existed! Checking out their reviews, even for the expensive ones that come with foot pedals, I would suggest they're fun unless you're used to the real thing, in which case you'll find they're unplayable, that's how it seems. As they're not played in the same way, I would say they're not sufficient to practice with. There ...


2

An interesting thought !On all of my acoustic pianos, so it's not just one, a key can be pressed down less than a quarter of the way to make the note sound.HOWEVER, if that key is pressed in the conventional way, straight downwards, it may or may not make a sound.Pressed all the way gently, no sound. Pressed with more force, sound. Mostly with volume ...


2

If you're learning scales for guitar, then a powerful way to practice scales is to play the arpeggiated harmonized scale. Take for example C major. C D E F G A B The harmonized scale are the diatonic chords that use each note in the scale as the root. C Dm Em F G Am Bdim The harmonized arpeggiated scale would be: C E G D F A E G B F A ...


2

Different people think in different ways, and what works for you may not work for other people. So you need to do some exploring, to find out how your own mind works. Some alternatives to thinking in terms of intervals for each step: Concentrate on how it sounds For some people, it helps to have an idea in your head of what the scale will sound like, then ...



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