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16

Beethoven got close in the final movement of his last piano sonata (the relevant part is from 0:30 to the end of the video)


14

You have stumbled across the PENTATONIC SCALE. Of which there are two - major and minor. Ascending, by starting on F#/Gb, you have the major pent., start on D#/Eb and it's the minor. The five notes (hence pent!) work well and harmoniously together, with nothing that clashes (is dissonant). These notes work well together, as the 'avoid notes' as we call ...


10

I'd honestly expect it to be flat rather than sharp! If the piano has a wooden frame holding the strings, it would be unwise to try to move the tuning much. When you tried it, and it was in tune, maybe it wasn't at concert pitch anyhow. If the frame is cast iron, it shouldn't have gone out by that much - unless it's not been tuned for years, and maybe has ...


9

If you have the option of an intrinsically easier piece that will teach them the same things, that's definitely a fine choice. However, yes I do believe that you are worrying too much. Playing different styles and arrangements of the same song is something I've always enjoyed doing, and I think it's actually beneficial. Something about the contrast allows ...


8

We all learn pieces in different ways. It could be said that, actually, really good sight readers don't need to 'learn' pieces, and some I know will give excellent performances of pieces the first time they play them. They are superb sight readers. Others, like myself, will have to play a piece in various ways to get to know it. As in go over and over a ...


7

This is an instruction how to play the trills at a) b) and c) [bars 4 and 7 of the Menuet and bar 4 of the Andante]. Check there are small letters that correspond to each trill.


5

There's nothing wrong with doing it the way you are, but it will definitely hamper your ability to sight-read. If that's an ability you want to have — or even if you just want the ability to figure out a piece quicker — then yes, you should work on sight reading. What you describe sounds very similar to how I started learning, and it took a lot ...


5

I believe that is a decision you will have to make yourself after taking everything into consideration. It is impossible for anyone on this site to really gain a complete understanding of the whole situation in its entirety given the limitations of the site. What I mean is there are so many factors to consider that it would be cumbersome for a site like ...


5

Yes. The slur just indicates that the note should touch the preceding note, but it's still played on time and ended according to the staccato dot. Basically, a slur does not change the last note it reaches but only the notes before it.


5

In that age it is most important, that your child has fun playing the piece, so it will actually like to play it. There is no special value in the "original" version for a child, and pieces come in lots of variants (instrumentation, transposition, arrangement, ...). I would more expect, that after some time having made technical progress the child will be ...


4

In the classical sector, there is Chopins etude for the black keys, G flat major, op. 10, no. 5, cf youtube for sound and imslp for the score.


4

Many musicians learn to overcome various handicaps (including missing fingers) and become very accomplished on their instrument of choice. People play with their head and their heart - their fingers are just a means to execute what they wish to express musically. Given enough desire and commitment, anyone can learn to play piano or guitar with fewer than ...


4

I don't know how much the boogie players were classically trained on average, but to answer the question "Is there anything in the pre-20th century classical canon that resembles the boogie-woogie bass line" the Alberti Bass, as pointed out by Laurance Payne, sure comes to mind. But I would add a number of pieces by Bach. Take for example the second prelude ...


4

The one says "2da volta" means "second repeat". You play the given bars in the second repeat while playing the main variant (of the top staff, presumably) otherwise. The "Ossia" means "Other": optionally, you can play the small variant instead of the main variant below it.


3

There's no simple and general guideline that I know of, except to use the fingering that works best for you. Of course that's not much help if you don't know where to start. Traditionally, you learn by studying fingered scores from easy pieces and instrument method books. Look for a beginners book with fingering indications, like suggested by Todd, and ...


3

Try playing a few tunes that they know well, but with different timings. Ask them to recogise the tunes - which will be impossible.That's the time to explain timing! Also, play long/short notes for recognition purposes, as a game. then introduce middle length notes and so on. Sight reading is NEVER going to be successful when done by students on their own. ...


3

There is never a "correct" answer for fingering, but I suggest: (51)-5-3-2-1-2 (but the last finger depends rather on what comes next) At the beginning: it is usually better to avoid repeating a finger on a key, and the thinking behind the perhaps surprising initial jump is that your hand "knows" where the second F# is, because your thumb is sitting on it. ...


3

I suppose you could draw a comparison with the Alberti Bass. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberti_bass


3

There is a jazz scale theory, coming mainly from the modal period, with contributions from the jazz theorist George Russell, that approaches improvisation by viewing "every chord as having one or more scales that can be played over it" (www.jazzstandards.com/theory/modal-jazz.htm). Here's a possible chords-scales correspondence (this chart is my attempt at ...


3

Standard sheet music specifies the octaves quite precisely. The lowest line in the treble clef, for example, is E4 (the E in the fourth octave): Ledger lines can also be added above and below the staves to extend their range, and you might sometimes see 8va written above or below certain notes to indicate that they should be played an octave higher or ...


2

I would check out the music courses on udemy.com, especially by Rosa Suen. There are basically two types of music lessons -- one is for classic music which is what many piano teacher teach, but the other is to play by ear. Rosa teaches you how to take a "fun melody" and how to harmonize it on the left hand. Most popular music sheet music shows the melody ...


2

There's something about 'better the devil you know'. We don't know if you've been with her for most of that 5 yrs, but an average rate of exam taking is around one grade per year. It seems you are mostly concerned with her approach to you sight-reading. The very best way to go forward with sight-reading is to do it in the presence of a teacher, who should ...


2

It seems that your teacher may be getting as frustrated at your (rather slow) progress as you are with her. Sure, try a different teacher. Just tell her you're going to, in a straightforward manner. No need to make a speech about why.


2

You have had this teacher for five years, without issue? Perhaps you have hit an obstacle you are having trouble communicating to your teacher. It is not a sin for a teacher to become frustrated, however you are paying for a service. Perhaps you could arrange a meeting with your teacher to discuss the issue away from the instrument.


2

I'm in the same boat you are. Played saxophone for years before picking up piano and really struggled going from reading one note at a time to 3 for each hand! Yet, learning pieces my way allowed me to memorize about 20 pieces. I play them for my church occasionally and get great comments!... And then they say, "Hey can play such and such song for me in a ...


2

The most important when counting is to get the basic beat right. In 4/4 like you havehere, you normally count the quarters: When you have a punctuated quarter, the next beat comes before it is finished. See the first measure here: Note that you have a small eigth note (the first G♯ in the last measure) that is put in between the other notes. It is ...


2

The treble clef for the first 2 bars can be counted like 1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a b d f# b a a g# g# 1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a f# d d (hold note) I'll leave the rest ...


2

If it helps, keep in mind that in music typography helps a lot with counting too. If the music is reasonably well set, notes in the two clefs that sound together are vertically aligned. For example, in the first bar of the second passage, you can see that the first of the two semiquavers in the treble clef aligns with the fourth quaver in the bass clef so ...


2

Your proposed 5 2 1 2 1 2 breaks the basic "rule" of scale and arpeggio fingering, which is your thumb always plays a white note - unless there are no white notes at all, of course. Note: of course that rule doesn't apply to the right hand - the Eb Ab C is not really an arpeggio, it's just a 3-note chord, and there is no problem fingering it 5-1-3, 4-1-2, ...


2

The "tuning" argument is irrelevant. Tuned drums are used in many different world musical traditions, as well as in western classical and popular music. Instrument classification is to some extent arbitrary, and many different "systems" have been used in different cultures at different periods of history. In western music, "keyboard instruments" are often ...



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