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9

Well, the thing to remember is that the harpsichord and organ have no touch sensitivity like piano, and the piano wasn't invented yet. So any kind of keyboard music was written to be played all at the same volume, and composers made the sound fuller or emptier by managing the voicing. If you play a Bach fugue on a piano, you can add dynamics but it won't ...


8

Make or buy yourself some flash cards for bass clef notes. Begin with a very small subset of cards -- choose several that you can identify reliably, such as middle C. If you have, say, 3 easy cards and 2 slightly harder cards, that's a good combination. On the back of the card, write the name of the note. Now shuffle and quiz yourself. Say the names of ...


7

There are two unrelated things going on here, and I'm not sure which you're asking about. The small bit of staff with the tiny notes on it is called an ossia. It goes with the staff below it, and gives you an alternative way to play that passage. In this case, the difference looks to be the location of the accented notes (marked with the > symbol), although ...


5

If you take a look at music like the two-part inventions and three-part symphonies by Bach, they make a lot of musical sense, and while they are intended as practice pieces, the prevalent problem (and increase of diffuculty when going from inventions to symphonies) is not one of hitting particular combinations of notes at the same time but rather of ...


4

Shift your perception down by one whole line/space. C below the treble clef is one line below the clef; C below the bass clef is two. High F is the top line of the treble clef; the top F of the bass clef is the second-from-top line. C on the treble clef is the space above the middle line; C on the bass clef is the space below the middle line... and so forth. ...


4

Both are very unintuitive and kind of confusing. Why can't you put them in the middle, like in the Roland TB 3? They occupy the same space as in your setup, but the positioning makes more sense and is more intuitive.


3

I do it like But, really, a pc keyboard has no key velocity and is often limited to 3 keys down max before it starts ignoring keys... bleh :(


3

The vii dim is a somewhat-frequently-used chord in the Baroque, especially in first inversion, as here (G#dim/B). This chord is typically used as a substitute for the dominant seventh (e.g. E7 in this case), as it shares the V7's leading tone (the G♯) and it's melodic tendency to resolve upwards towards tonic (A). Indeed, a vii dim chord is essentially ...


3

This is something that will improve with time, but you should practice regularly if you want to improve it faster. Even a few minutes a day only spent reading bass clef (not playing the piano) should be enough. If you’re taking public transportation, this is a great place to practice. The restroom is a good place as well.


3

I've played both piano and bass guitar, and what helps me is a bit of transposition. Find a tune that you can play on your right hand, in treble clef, well. Make sure it's something you could stand to listen to like 100 more times. Using a blank staff (lines on a piece of notebook paper work fine), transpose that line into bass clef. A G in treble clef ...


3

There simply is no easy way about it. You begin at your entry points (as I like to call them) F being on the second line from top and G being on the bottom line on the staff. You may also find it useful to write the letters A-B-C-D-E-F-G out on your answer book. You have notes on lines and in spaces and when you go down on the staff you count backwards and ...


3

My advice: relax. You can't make a trill faster by straining; as soon as you notice you start straining, take a step back and begin slowly and relaxed again. I would advice against flicking, since this will induce unnecessary strains in your finger, and will not be a viable option in the long term. Another trick: my piano teacher always used to try and have ...


3

You don't need to play an instrument in order to write for it. After all, the vast majority of people don't play every orchestral instrument (at least not well; music ed majors typically have to learn a bit of everything but they're not expected to achieve anything close to mastery). It's just important that you know how every instrument works so that you ...


3

Before getting into sound quality, one thing that can set pianos apart is their action. Last time I knew a lot about what was going on with pianos, only pianos with horizontal strings (grand style) could have a full proper double escapement action. That affects how quickly you can play the same note again after you've played it at least once, and/or how far ...


3

Yes. That book, while being very good, is not paced well for beginners. It throws a ton of hard-to-learn stuff at you right away. I'd recommend supplementing it with other books that perhaps have more written out examples to work with as well. I wouldn't say it's good as an only book. The thing about learning is jazz is that I could sit down with a new ...


3

Sliding as Tim suggests is definitely a possibility, but my teachers always discouraged it. As you noted in the comments it can be difficult to move while pedalling, and it is generally a somewhat awkward and inaccurate movement regardless (especially if the bench is leather or something and you must lift off it to slide down). I think a combination of ...


2

The anatomical problem is not so much that the 5th finger is weak (on its own it is as strong as the others) but that the 4th and 5th are not fully independent since they are operated by different parts of the same muscle, and in "normal life" they don't get much use that develops their independence. A simple demonstration of this: put your hand flat on a ...


2

Good answer, but I need to strongly emphasize the following after playing on a digital piano (basically a weighted and better keyboard) for 10 years: The pedal, the pedal, the pedal, is 100% completely different. It doesn't matter the first few years of playing, because you are busy getting other more "important" (or rather, more immediate) techniques down ...


2

Practice sight-reading a single line on the bass clef on its own. You can find plenty of music for cello, bassoon, songs for bass voice, etc, to download from http://imslp.org/. I started as a keyboard player, and The way I taught myself to read "less common" clefs, like C clefs on any line of the stave in old vocal scores was to focus on just a few ...


2

When I was in college, I helped a few people with learning to read new clefs. One tuba especially really needed help with treble clef. Know that whatever method works for you to learn it, eventually you become fluent and the method disappears, much like it did with treble clef. As you guessed, what you need is exposure to more bass clef and you'll be able ...


2

I'm a guitar player, so naturally I learned the treble clef first, and only much later did I need to learn the bass clef. I remember what helped me a lot then. It is maybe trivial and all too obvious, but as a pure visual help I imagined that the notes stay where they are (with respect to the treble clef) and that the lines shift up by one. I.e., I tried to ...


2

Start simple. Take a familiar tune like "Happy Birthday" and pick a starting note. Lets just pick "G" (this means you will be playing the tune in the key of C Major). Keep trying to play the song, re-starting from the beginning every time until you can get through the entire thing. At first, this will be difficult. You'll play the first 8 notes, and ...


2

I suggest starting with lead sheets, with melody and chords only. The term "playing by ear" was always a pejorative when I was young. It meant some kind of illiterate flailing at the instrument, maybe learning rote patterns with no idea of how they worked together musically. (Think of little kids playing "Heart and Soul" with four hands - great fun.) But ...


2

Here are some suggestions, have a try and let us know how it goes: Get a feel for the tune CD player / Media player, play a tune that is not too complicated you have never learnt Listen to the whole tune a few times until you can hear in your head what the next melody will be before it plays Learn in parts - Play a few seconds at a time (a phrase) and ...


2

Rit is probably ritenuto, an immediate slowing down, as opposed to rubato, and tenuto means hang on for full note value - or even a touch longer: which makes sense as one will make the other happen.So, the whole bar should come at a slightly slower pace than the preceding bars. On the assumption it's written in C at that point - I'm guessing - you can play ...


2

Some objective differences to listen for: Dynamic range. On an "entry level" instrument, if you play with enough force you get more mechanical noises, not louder notes. In a really poor instrument you might even break something. The quality of the action also limits how softly you can play without randomly not playing notes at all. In the 6-figure price ...


2

That is bach's cello prelude from suite no1? I used to play that on the piano, and I always stretched. As you get more advanced, you will be playing pieces that require this kind of stretching, and you will learn how to quickly adjust your hand in order to allow your fingers to go where they need to go. I am not sure what finger substitution is in this ...


2

Finger substitution is not the way to go, unless you are playing an organ and not the piano. Absolute legato on the piano isn't as important as playing the notes with even tempo and dynamics. If you have small hands you can play the whole passage fingered 5 4 1 2 1 4 1 4 5 4 1 2 1 4 1 4 etc. Learn to "jump" unobtrusively between 5 and 4. You can cover the ...


2

It's always good to have the rhythmic feel of a piece/style in your bones as (or even before) you try to learn it. If you're really not familiar with the style, play the music around the house, and dance to it - or at least practice clapping on the 2 and the 4! Think of the music swinging to and fro, with the 1 on the "left", 2 on the "right", 3 on the left, ...


2

Short answer: C/F-G Long answer: In the key of G-major he's playing IV-I in the right hand (which sounds like a plagal cadence, though it's not strictly cadential) with b7-1 scale degree motion in the left hand. He's also ornamented these chords with an appogiatura consisting of D-E leading into the F of the first chord, and similarly with #2-3 for the ...



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