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12

Can't use feet well, but if you could move a knee to one side, it would be a simple lever attachment to the pedal, maybe from your wheelchair. Look at knee levers that pedal steel players use. You only really need the damper pedal - the 'soft' pedal could be added later, but it's not as vital as the sustain.


8

the numbers are indeed fingerings. The circle indicates that the hand position is changing. The long curved lines are not sostenuto pedal markings, they're "legato" markings. Legato means that you play the marked phrase smoothly note into note, without spaces or rests between the notes. You're correct that the numbered measures near the repeat sign are ...


7

This may not be as "simple" as it first appears, because (apart from the most basic playing technique) the piano pedal action is not just an "on-off switch". You need to control the speed of movement, and not necessarily depress the pedal fully. Also the pedals need quite a lot of force to operate them, which is no problem for normal human feet, but would ...


6

Can't think why some numbers are in circles - they refer to fingerings - 1= thumb, r.h. in the treble clef. Yes, it's a phrase rather than a slur, so no pedal as the harmony changes. It is a repeat sign. Play the first part again, and second time around, don't play 'bar 1'. Poco moto is a way to say push it along a bit, rather than just keep a tempo going. ...


5

There are no tricks. Just a lot of practice with songs at a level that you find easy. Strive to stay in time and just read as well as you can. This is a separate practice in addition to learning new songs/keeping repertoire fresh/improv exercises/etc etc etc. In a year with lots of practice it'll get noticeably easier. Past 2 years (again, with lots ...


5

I'm not sure if this is any help, but I would probably approach the problem first by suggesting you swap out an acoustic piano for an electronic keyboard. This allows for other controllers to be used in non-standard ways (usually using the MIDI control standard). You might find that this is quite technical to start on, I'm not sure where you stand with ...


5

The two things required to understand this piece are: tie and slur symbols look the same but have different meanings. in piano music, especially polyphonic, you can have many melodies (think - virtual staves) squeezed into a single staff. The slur / tie problem: If you tie two notes (they need to have the same pitch), it is always played as a single ...


5

Fermatas do not have a specific length. You would just hold the note longer than the value for effect typically at the discretion of the performer or conductor based on what kind of effect you want. For this specific piece, the tempo is pretty fast so any piano should be able to sustain it easily and the piece is well known enough that you can listen to ...


5

To answer the parts of your question specific to the piano, it's entirely acceptable to allow the sound to die away. Silence is a part of music too, or we wouldn't have rests. One way to get more sustain, though, is to use a concert grand piano. (I'm being a bit facetious, of course--I don't have $50,000+ kicking around and you probably don't either--but ...


4

The answer is to learn both. They are not exclusive of each other, and as you say, you're going to learn both eventually anyway. Both require development of your music reading skills. Spending time on the one will not detract from the study of the other. Virtually all advanced, university-level music programs require the student to have fundamental basic ...


4

There are instruments like harpsichord or clavichord that seldom (or even never) had pedals similar to the pedals of the modern piano. And the music for these instruments is often played on a piano now. I suggest to practice without pedals and perfect your skill to replace them by manual action where needed. Pedals just help to control the duration and ...


4

In principle you could use the Italian marking "M.S. solo" meaning literally "Left hand only". But "Solo" might be read with a different meaning (i.e. "this piece is for one player"), even though that would seem to make little sense in your context. I think you would be better using a full sentence in your native language, either in the title or at the start ...


4

I believe that the oft-cited analogy with learning a language is quite to the point. You need to learn (i.e., copy) words, phrases, and simple sentences, and after a lot of practice you will be able to form your own sentences and express what you want to convey. You can speed up that process from copying to self-expression by total immersion, i.e. by ...


4

You hold a fermata until it stops crying. Or rather, until you have the attention of the audience and before you lose it again. In a room with reverbation, you stop until the onset of a p will overcome the remaining reverb of an ff. There is a fresh start after a fermata, and you should make it appear like that. With a sustaining instrument like an ...


3

Music is more than playing the right pitches at the right time. Playing the right pitches at the right time is the absolute minimum standard to producing a musical work. Here's a bunch of the other mechanical phenomena you must then also get "right": Tempo (including variations in tempo, such as rubato) Dynamics (both volume and attack) Phrasing. Once ...


3

You could have any of a variety of forms of wrist overuse injury. I've been there from music, and I used to work in the sports world where this is endemic. The bottom line is it doesn't matter what specific form you have, carpal tunnel, tendonitis, bursitis, etc, they are all different forms of inflammation from overuse. Your connective tissue grows slower ...


3

This score writes three voices. The lowest voice is in the lower staff, stem down. The middle voice is in the upper staff, stem down, its rests close to the bottom staff line. The top voice is in the upper staff, stem up, its rests close to the top staff line. As the piece progresses, the middle line (if I remember correctly) will likely venture into the ...


3

Without knowing all of the dimensions - your height, leg length, arm length, upper to lower body proportion, height of existing chairs, size of books, etc. etc., it's almost impossible to answer sensibly. However, what you use is patently obviously not good! Everyone will sit in a slightly different posture to play. Ideally, the keyboard starting height ...


2

Generally, notes with up tails are deemed to be 'the melody'. Notes with down tails, as here, are ' the accompaniment'. Thus, the tune starts with two notes that are not the melody. There are three lines to this tune, and since the top line doesn't start immediately, it needs a rest shown. Similarly, so does the middle line of notes. That 'eighth note' is a ...


2

This is what this score is saying: 1st 16th note, play and hold middle C with your left hand. 2nd 16th note, play and hold the E above middle C with your right thumb. 3rd - 5th 16th notes, keep holding the E with your right thumb while other fingers of your right hand complete the arpeggio. 6th - 8th 16th notes, keep holding the E with your right thumb (do ...


2

It is probably safe to assume that digital piano will be supported for the duration of the warranty. Then some Rolland and Yamaha models feature up to five year warranty (in comparison, Yamaha acoustic pianos have ten year warranty). I think this should be enough as for the wedding present; many wedding presents are household items that, when normally used, ...


2

After taking piano lessons for several months, I want to answer my own question now. The piano teacher made me realize my mistakes and gave exercises to get rid of them. Some of my mistakes/realizations were: Sticky fingers: When I press a new key, I was holding the note before for a short time. So, there were some time that you could hear both notes, ...


2

There is no "objective" standard of goodness here. The better player will convince the listener that what they are hearing is worth listening to. There's nothing much more to be said than that. Of course some of "listeners" may be in the hall for reasons other than actually listening, if the player is "famous" - and some people seem judge piano playing by ...


2

How is the music from the more gifted player objectively better? Strictly speaking, one could only say that one performance is subjectively better than the other. (Although it might sometimes happen that a preference for one of the players is unanimous.) Another "strictly speaking" remark: the famous performer might not always come out ahead! I once ...


2

First off, "famous" as a criteria for assessing virtuosity is problematic at best. Additionally, the ability of a particular audience to discern quality is also problematic. What it comes down to is that music is not just a sequence of notes arranged in a particular juxtaposition to each other. Music is communication, it's a form of core emotional ...


2

You could think about how you use the guitar most, if you mostly play to accompany yourself singing, the piano may be a better choice. If you treat the guitar as a solo (melodic) instrument, or regularly have other musicians to play with, the violin may be a better choice. For what it's worth, playing the piano develops and uses a lot more transferable ...


2

Easy. Three steps: 1.) Spell each chord 2.) Keep shared notes between chords. 3.) Move other notes the least amount of distance possible to spell next chord.


2

As a string player, I found playing in small and large ensembles very helpful for getting more solid with sightreading. Playing with others forces you to keep going even if you missed a little something along the way. And it helps you get in the habit of looking slightly ahead so you aren't too surprised by a sudden key change or whatever. Pianists are at ...


2

First of all, it should be noted that the edition you have picked is no paragon of typesetting. All of the notes are there, but... The time signature has been changed from 3/8 to 3/4, with all note values doubled. This is probably to avoid scaring beginners with intimidating-looking notes that look short or fast. The eighth notes are beamed in pairs, ...


2

Depending on the repertoire you want to play you might consider playing Mozart's fortepiano. It is not always built with pedals; sometimes hand stops or knee levers were used instead -Wikipedia The music written for these instruments tends to differ in the way that the 'pedals' are used, they might be held on for longer passages. If music of this ...



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