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10

Hard to describe exactly without a picture/photo, but you place the two fingers you find most convenient at the usual angle for a glissando, keeping them parallel and a fixed distance apart. Then you try it, and it sounds awful, but you practice. And practice. And more practice, until it begins to sound like a real glissando. Then you need more practice. ...


8

To add to Bob's good answer - three main things which can make a piano worth keeping: if the frame (harp) is wooden, then the pins are likely, on an old piano, to be loose, so when it's tuned (up, usually), it won't keep pitch. The frame needs to be iron. Heavier, yes but firmer and stronger, too. If the strings are vertical, it will be o.k., but with an ...


8

The sustain (damper) pedal on a studio piano pushes a rod which connects to the lever which connects to the dampers. This is adjustable with a screw, to allow the dampers to rest on the strings (apart from the top octave or so) with the correct pressure, when the pedal is at rest. It sounds like the dampers are not pressing enough. It won't be a feature, and ...


7

That might depend on where the piano was made [& how carefully], its intended market locale & whether it has subsequently been moved from that location. A good piano maker will season the wood it is to be made from in the country of the intended final destination so the entire seasoning is done in similar climatic conditions to those in which the ...


6

It is "bad" for the piano in that a piano is not designed to have the una corda pedal (that's the "soft pedal") stomped on. The danger here is that by stomping, you can damage the mechanism that moves all of the hammers over, thereby breaking the instrument. On upright pianos the una corda pedal is replaced with a practice pedal in which a felt curtain is ...


6

There is at least one example of a concert pianist who started when he was 14 -- Nicholas McCarthy, who as well as starting late, has the disadvantage of being born with only one hand! So it is possible. Do bear in mind that 99.9% of the pianists who start earlier than the age of 7, do not become concert pianists either.


6

On piano music, with treble and bass clefs, if the dynamics mark is between them, it refers to both parts (hands). If it's for the treble, it's found above the treble, and if for bass alone, it's found under the bass.


6

I'm not sure if you're interested in classical examples, but this kind of thing happens all the time in Baroque music, almost to the point of being ubiquitous. One quick example that pops to mind is this section from Brandenburg Concerto #2. Start the passage right at (or slightly before) 2:00 (apparently SE doesn't honor t=### tags in youtube links). This ...


5

Not only are pianos heavier than you probably think - but also the weight distribution is uneven. They are difficult objects to move safely. This is what professionals do: The piano is transported to the truck using a dolly - that is a flat trolley with big strong castors. For a grand piano, the legs get removed and the piano is balanced on its side. ...


5

In general you don't need to use the same scale over every chord. This case is a very interesting, but common one in modern music and can be seen in a few songs including Unchanined by Van Halen. If we slightly modify one of the chords, the key becomes apparent. If you change the C# to a C#m it is easy to see the chords C#m, B, and A are in C# minor. Thus ...


5

I'm hearing two questions: 1) What notes are safe for me to play? 2) What notes are important? While overlapping, these are different questions that will each have a large impact on your solo. The first is easier to answer, but understanding the second will make you a better musician. tl; dr Try them all, but only repeat the notes you like. 1) Safety ...


4

I think you have the order of transition wrong. So in the first image (L.H.), you'd play the high F (assuming bass clef) with your thumb (1), then the D with the index finger (2). You'd then continue holding down the D with your thumb (2), which allows you to reach down to the C (with your pinkie). So you're transitioning from finger 2 to 1 (not from 1 to 2 ...


4

I'm no piano expert, but I'll get the ball rolling with some obvious things to check: does every key make a sound when it is pressed? In other words, does every key cause a hammer to strike a string? does every key return to the height it started at after being played? does every note stop ringing after the key is released? If not, some of the dampers are ...


4

Blindfolding might be taking it a bit too far, but I guess it can't hurt. I personally like to play in the dark. :) I find it helps in several respects: Obviously, it's going to help you learn to play automatically, without any crutches, and reinforce your muscle memory. I've also found that it helps you focus your attention on your sound and execution: ...


4

I assume you are talking about a grand piano. It is possible to snap the legs off when pushing it, if a caster gets stuck. It is rare that it happens, but you definitely want to make sure it NEVER happens to an instrument that weighs 300 pounds and costs $10,000 (or $100,000). When professional movers move a piano from one side of a room to another, ...


4

It depends on how you use your practice time, your tenacity, creativity, business acumen, opportunities you create, and good ol' fashioned LUCK. More practice is not necessarily better - use your practice time wisely. A strict concert pianist, where you travel the world and people listen to you play, is rare. Often pianists will have that be a part of what ...


4

You can use heat reflecting panels between radiator and piano to have some protection. This helps radiator to heat only the circulating air but not the surfaces it sees directly. Also place a bowl of water with a wide surface (for better evaporation) under the piano and over the radiator to increase humidity during heating season.


4

Other editions make it clearer: trill each note, starting on the note rather than the auxiliary (where he specifies it with an accacciatura). You can see it in Scharwenka's edition here. Edit: I should clarify this a bit: Chopin is using accacciature in this passage to specify the starting notes of the trills.


3

It is about talent, dedication, concentration, familiarity with the culture, capacity of brain-muscle coordination and ability to self-criticize. There are many examples of incredibly successful performers and musicians in other genres then classical music, who start playing instruments quite late like 15-20 years old. One reason for that is the classical ...


3

If you are looking at used acoustic pianos, you can find them from anywhere from a few hundred to tens of thousands of dollars. For under $1000, the market is very much buyer beware. Unless you have access to an expert, or are buying from someone you trust to know the instrument’s history, and who tells you that the instrument has been well cared for and ...


3

A couple of feet is as close as you want to be. It depends also on how hot that rad gets, and how long it's on for daily. One of mine is about 3 feet away, but because it has an iron frame, it's not been a problem. Wooden framed pianos can get dehydrated causing all sorts of nasties.


3

The one that immediately comes to mind for me is the jazz tune "Autumn Leaves." It was originally written in Gm, but for analysis purposes it's easier to think of in, say, Em. In that case the chord progression goes Am7 - D7 - Gmaj7 - Cmaj7 - F#m7b5 - B7 - Em7 (ivm7-VII7-IIImaj7-VIMaj7-iim7b5-V7-im7) - and there's your diatonic 4-7-3-6-2-5-1 progression ...


3

I think you are looking in the wrong place. There are many printed books on the subjects you are interested in, in libraries. These books have been written since the time of Schubert and Rachmaninov, but their contents have not made it onto the Internet. For example, I did a quick search at Google Books to find references to old books in libraries for ...


2

A dance in binary form, usually with repeats; slow triple time, usually with an emphasis on the second beat. That's about all that is really constant - the form evolved from what was originally a lively dance in triple metre.


2

Triple time is about the only stable thing about the sarabande. It started life as a Guatemalan/ Spanish/Arabian dance, with a rapid tempo, danced by women, and accompanied with castanets. It was regarded by some as risque and banned. Later the French took it on as a much more staid dance, still with the 3 feel, and it was accepted as a more genteel dance, ...


2

Gee... there isn't enough space to answer your question here or in any written, set material really. If you want to study systematically, I strongly recommend you hire a few teachers, explain what you are after, see which ones you like best, and stick with that one for a year rain or shine before reassessing where you want to go. The problem with ...


2

When you wrote C#, by convention, you wrote C# major. And so in C#, the B and A chords are altered. The B and A chords do fit diatonically in C# minor. So you do have some interesting things you can do with this. It might help not to think so much of scales, but rather, neighbor notes and the possibilities you now have. This is especially true for the A ...


2

A program such as Transcribe! from http://www.seventhstring.com/xscribe/overview.html can be very helpful. You probably already have programs that will slow down, eq, loop, place markers etc. an audio clip, but Transcribe! combines all the useful functions in one convenient, cheap, package. (I'm just a satisfied user, I don't get a penny if you buy it.) ...


2

It is not hard to work out a number of keys when avoiding remembering this by heart. A full piano has: 4 full octaves up from the middle C (C3) 3 full octaves down also from the middle C plus 3 additional keys at left next to C0. An octave (e.g. from C3 to B3) contains 12 keys. The number of keys: 3 extra keys at the left 3 octaves at the left, ...


2

Unfortunately, neither keyboard will respond like a piano. Properly weighted keys are far more important to learning piano than the number of keys. Therefore, if you really must have a keyboard now, go with the one you like the feel of better, and that sounds like the Yamaha. But seriously, if you want something that feels like a piano, then wait a while, ...



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