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17

If you would like to see a tour de force in the use of repeated notes, have a look at Martha Argerich's performance of Scarlatti's D Minor Sonata: You will notice that she uses 321321 ...


13

There are big differences between those two scales. The C major scale consists of the following notes: C D E F G A B The C minor scale consists of the following notes: C D Eb F G Ab Bb 3 of the 7 notes of the scale are different so it is not a small difference. It sounds to me like you need to take ear training classes. Ear training can make you ...


13

The synth patches that you want will exist if you build them yourself. :) You might consider studying some of the older musicians such as Keith Emerson and Rick Wakeman. At that time, people usually rolled their own sounds, building them from the basic four waveforms. Also, you might read up on "additive synthesis" which has to do with the theory behind ...


12

The black and white bits are the same, except you will probably only get 49/61 of them instead of the 88 you're probably used to. The action will be rather different, too. No matter how loudly or quietly you try to play, the volume will remain the same. There is no sustain pedal, so that will be different, too. You'll have to acclimatise yourself to playing ...


11

It's obvious when you think about it, but the biggest difference between an organ and a piano is the way their sounds decay. A piano is a hammer hitting a string. The loudest sound is right at the beginning, and from there on the sound decays organically as the string returns to rest. If you let the dampers do their thing, the decay is shortened, but it's ...


8

All digital keyboards will allow you to plug a pair of headphones in and use it via them. As far as brand is concerned, it's really down to personal preference and your budget. I myself am a Yamaha fan, but you may prefer Casio, for example. The type of keyboard you should buy is down to how you will be using it. If you are learning playing classical ...


7

Valentin is right, keeping your nails a bit shorter is probably one of the most useful things to do. But, let me add a few things. I am primarily a guitarist, and I play the piano, but wouldn't consider myself a pianist; so, much of my advice is from a guitarist's perspective. Even though most of the classical guitarists I know (including me!) use nails, ...


6

Pro active supplemental learning should be encouraged and only tempered by proper instruction when it applies to your technique or anything related to the way you control your body, arms, wrists, and fingers. Managing the precious surplus time you have and aiming it at practicing scales, arpeggios, and chords, learn new ones, improvise with what you have ...


5

I'm wondering if there are any important benefits to either technique. Where speed is needed, alternating fingerings on the same note really do help, and it pays off to take the time to learn this, however unnatural it might seem at first. Of course, you'll find up to a certain speed you'll be able to tap out the same note again and again without an ...


5

The letters Above mean the Implied/intended harmony. There are 2 possibilities I see here as to why an F and C7 are listed. If you are playing solo There are certain common chord progressions in music. The go-to example always seems to be I-V-I, and what this means is that the chords move from the first/tonic chord of the scale(in this case F, to the ...


5

It really depends on the size of your hands, but for me (with an average-ish hand span), this is the 'best' way of doing it: 5 - 3 - 2 - 1 - 3 (over) - 1 - 2 - 1 That just fell under my fingers when I sightread the passage - it may not work for you. Other pianists can only recommend fingering, since everyone's hands are different. However, you can ...


5

I think subtle expression possibilities is the key. Piano, electric piano and organs have a large and very finely controllable dynamic sound range1 (either by true continuous 𝆑𝆓𝆏 spectrum right "at the fingertips", or lots of of possible organ stop/drawbar combinations), so you can always counteract where it might get tiresome, without however necessarily ...


5

There's a boogie pattern 1-3-5-6-b7-6-5-3- used for 12 bar blues. Walking bass patterns (usually on each beat) use all the notes from the scale of the key you're in,- you can use any order, preferably starting a bar with the root note. Theory says that there's a good chance one or two of the other notes in the bar will fit the chord, even random notes ! But ...


4

To change or not to change. This depends. You've got three choices here: to play the same key with the same finger - Piano Sonata No. 21 (Waldstein), First movement: Allegro con brio by Ludwig van Beethoven to play the same key with another finger - Étude Op. 10, No. 7 by Frédéric Chopin to split the same key between different hands - Toccata in D minor, ...


4

Interesting - there is a 'top down' for guitar music. I'm thinking of popular guitar tunes, rather than classical guitar. People who self-teach generally start off learning chord shapes which will enable you to strum your way through a song. A lot of guitar tutorials work this way. You can also learn "basic" chords which will work, and add more intricacy ...


4

I would suggest schools, but more and more schools are getting rid of their pianos. However, if you find one, ask about seeing the caretaker and going in at holidays (now!) or weekends. Some pubs may provide, and maybe you could play in the background when punters are in. Occasionally rehearsal studios (not cheap) have a real piano.Colleges , especially ...


3

Mainly they have been written in for guitarists. The R.H. and L.H. for the piano player are there in place, so the tune will sound good as is. However, as Alexander points out, there are often more notes available for each part of a tune, as in a C7 is made from C-E-G-Bb, but not all of them are used by the composer all the time. Guitarists sometimes ...


3

It sounds like you're probably going to play the Mendelssohn Wedding March. If so, this should be okay for you to play on the organ. Just looking on Google, there are loads of arrangements of this piece, both for piano and organ. Of course, a piano version will suit you much better, as you won't need to play the third stave, which is the pedal part played ...


3

There is no fixed association of the left hand with the bass clef. Plenty of non-eccentric composers like Mozart and Beethoven wrote whole passages where the left hand is playing high enough to be easiest written in treble clef. Sometimes the right hand dives over the left to play low bass notes, and is written in the bass clef.


3

Well, this is kind of late, but, no, you can not learn to tune a piano in a day. Why do I say this? Well, I am a Registered Piano Tuner with the Piano Technicians Guild and I've been teaching piano tuning for eight years. You can however learn a lot in a 20 hour basic crash course. But how well your tuning will sound after depends on your ear and ...


3

The player says at the bottom in red "Flash Created By "My Music" Developers in partnership with Musipedia". This links to http://joshkoo.comp.nus.edu.sg/mymusic/ which is no longer available, but I would guess that's supposed to link to a page indicating "Josh Koo" is the guy that created the player. The reason it sounds like a piano is probably that it ...


3

You could program a MIDI device to play pitches this way when triggered from a regular MIDI keyboard. (For instance, to only have semitones on the white keys, and not to use the black keys - this would reduce the range of course.) It would make a nonsense of the repeating pattern of black and white keys though…! These would no longer have the same pattern ...


3

Well, obviously the average usual piano is easier to play in the C major, but not in other keys On keyboards, digital pianos and even some rare acoustic pianos it is possible to use transpose feature if some other key seems much easier to play. I have learned some chord progressions with transposition first to make easier, but then re-learned to get ...


3

You're probably right. Even the most wonderful non-piano/organ synth patch would be too much if used for an entire concert (as would panpipes though). Many advanced synth performers will often tweak the patch as they play, equipment permitting. Sound wise, most synth sounds are going to emulate instruments that are either struck, plucked, bowed or blown, ...


2

I still remember one of my professors telling me once, when we were looking for a particularly sharp sound on a note in a piece (I think it was somewhere in Copland's "Variations for Piano"), holding his thumb and third finger together and banging down on the key from about eight inches. "That's your 'weapon'!" he grinned. You would be well served by ...


2

Matt's is an excellent answer. One idea behind it is to economize on lateral wrist movement. Interestingly, I had the opposite problem when studying scales. I found that passing the thumb under the fingers was more difficult, as I had developed the habit of raising the fingers rather high when playing notes. It stands to reason that this makes it difficult ...


2

Good choice of song! I Asked about the very same passage to my piano teacher, and it's actually not as difficult as you might imagine. Ok, here goes. Notice that the beginning arpeggios are all just a D major, and you have the exact same shape on the keys for each chord. I don't know what fingering you are using, but if you take 3 notes per ...


2

More often you go over the top, because there's a lot less room under your hand than over it. Sometimes if the moving hand is on white keys and the other hand is on black, it makes sense to go under. Hold your hands to minimize movement. Position your fingers over the notes. (Sorry, but that's where you're probably having trouble; you probably are on ...


2

I'm not sure what you mean, but I would say that depends of context. The major scale and minor scale are modes of the diatonic scale - Ionian and Aeolian, respectively. In a sense they're exact the same scale, but starting from a different note. They sound exactly the same. If you pick C major and its relative minor (A minor) and play them in a way you ...


2

I've gone the opposite way. I learned piano for a couple of years then tried my hand at guitar. I thought I wouldn't need any kind of beginner's books either, but a couple of months later saw me missing out on valuable techniques that would've made learning the instrument much easier. (Most of) guitar is... in the least offensive way possible, dumbed down, ...



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