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18

Is it too late for me to learn an instrument? No. It's never to old to learn anything. Having the determination and persistence to continue is the hard part. It might be harder for you to learn as your brain isn't as flexible as it was. Music is a language and it will take work to learn. Don't get discouraged though! Can I learn it by myself? ...


12

I will throw in my own take as I differ from the other opinions on a few points: Like everyone says: go for it. If you put in the time and attention to it, you will get rewarded. You mention "3 hours free time on weekdays and whole day on weekends for practice". I'd suggest that you start slow: practicing is tiring. Practice a tiny bit but regularly, ...


9

Dave is right, but there's a little more to it. You can break the part up into two different lines. One that looks like this: And another that looks like this: When you put them together, you get the two part represented by different stems. It's pretty much telling you to hold the first note for the length of a quarter note, but play the set of notes ...


5

The key you are in defines the harmony, what chords you naturally have access to, and what the tonic is. From a single chord alone you cannot determine for sure either the key or the tonic, especially for a minor chord which doesn't have as strong a pull towards other chords as, say, a dominant chord. There are a few possibilities depending which key you ...


5

There are two voices in this music: the lower plays f, then e as quarter notes; Note that the downward pointing stem's don't have flags/beams -- thus they are quarter notes. the upper plays f <a d> e <g c#> as eighth notes This is the way to write music where more than one voice happen to execute the same note at the same time. If you ...


4

A curved line connected two notes that are the same pitch is a tie. If they are different pitches, it is a slur. In this example, the C sharps in the bottom voices in the right hand are tied, and the other voices are played legato according to the slurs.


4

Finger pedalling, or finger sustain. I've also heard it referred to as "sticky fingers". If you switch fingers it would be part of finger substitution.


4

For question 1: It's never too late to learn anything. Age is never a barrier to learn anything. You are still 26 years old. How come you came to such a conclusion? And about your muscles and bones concerns, all I've got to say is you are not going to work out in a gym, weight lifting or body building. You are going to learn the best philosophy that can ...


4

The two things required to understand this piece are: tie and slur symbols look the same but have different meanings. in piano music, especially polyphonic, you can have many melodies (think - virtual staves) squeezed into a single staff. The slur / tie problem: If you tie two notes (they need to have the same pitch), it is always played as a single ...


3

In the lesson, it's about playing a scale - a set of 8 notes from one key, going up and down from the root note C. If the tune is a simple one, and it will be initially, maybe the 5 notes it uses will be right under your 5 fingers. However, it will depend on where the notes are in relation to each other. You may have to put a thumb under the hand to get a ...


3

Most pieces have the melody played by R.H. and accompaniment by L.H. So we piano players get used to this concept. This is the other way round, and the L.H. is playing the tune. Our left hand is not au fait with this, so it's tricky. You could try, for a bit of fun, swapping hands (and either octaves, or crossing) so it's more of a 'normal' situation. ...


3

Probably 95% of students who take lessons don't end up performing professionally. Music will be something they do for themselves and their friends, and good accompanists are rare in many areas. If she wants to be able to sing with an accompanist with any frequency, her options are to marry one (my wife's choice) or be able to accompany herself. Of course ...


3

Learning to play the violin by yourself is very hard. If a teacher is out of the question, then I strongly recommend going for the piano (there a lot of youtube tutorials for piano self-learners, I've yet to see one for a violin).


3

The symbol over the note (which can also be below a note, upside down) is called a fermata and nowadays it has become a standard indication of a pause*. Meaning that the duration of the note or a rest associated with the fermata will be longer than it's supposed to be. say for example, if it's above a quarter note then the duration of the quarter note could ...


2

That's a fermata, indicating to rest on this note longer than its nominal value.


2

I'd recommend the piano because you'll inherently learn more about music theory and how notes work together, and that will benefit you in many ways. Keyboards provide a very clear, visual analogy of the notes they create and this facilitates understanding the more abstract ideas in music (it can distract from it, too, but it helps more than it harms). ...


2

Generally, notes with up tails are deemed to be 'the melody'. Notes with down tails, as here, are ' the accompaniment'. Thus, the tune starts with two notes that are not the melody. There are three lines to this tune, and since the top line doesn't start immediately, it needs a rest shown. Similarly, so does the middle line of notes. That 'eighth note' is a ...


2

This is what this score is saying: 1st 16th note, play and hold middle C with your left hand. 2nd 16th note, play and hold the E above middle C with your right thumb. 3rd - 5th 16th notes, keep holding the E with your right thumb while other fingers of your right hand complete the arpeggio. 6th - 8th 16th notes, keep holding the E with your right thumb (do ...


2

It is probably safe to assume that digital piano will be supported for the duration of the warranty. Then some Rolland and Yamaha models feature up to five year warranty (in comparison, Yamaha acoustic pianos have ten year warranty). I think this should be enough as for the wedding present; many wedding presents are household items that, when normally used, ...


2

You're right that this is a very common chord shape, and it would be good to get it under control. Is the problem your hand size? Can you reach an octave without too much effort? The best simplification would be to drop the low B (and finger the remaining notes 1-3-5). B is the third of the chord, which least needs to be doubled, especially in a lower ...


2

This score writes three voices. The lowest voice is in the lower staff, stem down. The middle voice is in the upper staff, stem down, its rests close to the bottom staff line. The top voice is in the upper staff, stem up, its rests close to the top staff line. As the piece progresses, the middle line (if I remember correctly) will likely venture into the ...


1

You have to understand why playing dynamics make you fail both hands. My guess is that it makes you anticipate the next notes and because you are probably too shaky in both hands, you fail in putting them together. Try combinations of the following: continue practicing hands separately with dynamics play slowly both hands without dynamics, and with ...


1

Before you do ANY dynamics, you must be able to play the piece with both hands almost flawlessly. Dynamics are there to be added after the technique has gotten perfected. Play like a robot a few times, then once you've mastered that, you must accent the left hand melody more than the right. Again, no dynamics other than that. Once you've gotten that down, ...


1

Play the two hands separately slowly, noticing whether you're playing the melody or the accompaniment.


1

Slow down until you can play it (even if it means playing extremely slowly). Then gradually increase your speed.


1

I played violin (and later viola) since childhood up through college. I never learned piano. You say you don't want to engage a teacher. That's fine, it won't stop you from being able to play. But if you want to become really good that will hurt you because you'll learn habits that will prevent your technique from becoming really good later and those habits ...


1

Stick your A4 sheet music onto card. Then using gaffer tape or something else stick the cards together. This way you can have 2 3 or 4 sheets that will fold to A4 and still be solid enough to stand on music stand or piano etc.


1

i'm not a good pianist.. i've only spent my entire childhood learning the way of classical pieces... though i started to play pop musics on my church (basically pop christian songs), and indeed they are similar but different kind of music... it took 2-3 years for me to start getting about the pop music (again.. i'm not a good pianist)... as stated by ...


1

Edouard provided a perfect explanation. I don't have to add anything to that. Just a couple of comments: I would be very surprised if your digital piano was tuned with sharp low notes and flat high notes. Perhaps the samples Roland uses for the high notes have particularly strong (flat) harmonics and you are sensitive to them? It would be interesting if ...



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