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8

An 88 key piano will have a TOTAL of 88 keys. White keys + black keys = 88.


8

Yes. Now that does not seem like an overly helpful answer. The most important thing is that you feel the importance of the beats and the way they structure the music, and that your feeling is allowed to express yourself in its interpretation. For any instrument, there are a number of ways of putting expressiveness in, and all of those are, of course, ...


7

I'm a violinist, not a pianist, but it's very common for beginning violin players to have severe pain because they are too tense, especially when they are self taught. I'm going to suggest a few generic techniques to start minimizing tension. When you sit down at the piano, think about how you are sitting. Look for any tension, especially in your neck and ...


7

This is called a turn. The 'basic' version would be written without the accidentals, and the player would play the first note, then quickly play one tone (note) above, the main note again, a tone below, the main note, and the resolve one the final note. The accidentals clarify exactly which notes to "twiddle" to. The turn can be either directly over a ...


6

They say amateurs practice until they make no mistakes, while professionals practice until they're not able to make any mistakes... Mistakes include not only wrong notes but incorrect timing, dynamics, and whatever. This might be the cause for the first two characteristics you describe: they both play well but the professional is completely in control ...


6

As a guitar player I can assure you that your description of the difference between a self-taught and a instructed player apply to other instruments as well. I am not a piano player myself, but I took guitar lessons and taught myself a lot of things on my own after not taking lessons anymore. The difference between a high quality teacher and yourself is ...


6

It depends on the individual, but I'm going to talk about my own experience. Two things to note: It's not really true that each hand is doing something different. Both hands are working together to create a piece of music. Although at first glance it's "special" to have one hand playing one aspect of a piece while the other hand plays a different aspect ...


5

orthodox: adherence to accepted norms Is playing Bach like Glenn Gould orthodox or not? Some will swear by what he does with Bach and probably say yes, while others will cry out loud "Nooooooo"! I think answering your question about using the pedal with Bach faces the same dilemma: since Bach isn't there to tell you what he would like to have heard ...


5

I hope someone with actual harpsichord experience chimes in, since most of what I'm writing here is hear-say. As you no-doubt already know, the two main things that you lack on a harpsichord, compared to a piano, is a long sustain, and any appreciable dynamics. I've heard that one way to compensate for the lack of dynamics is to vary the duration of the ...


4

Modulation When music moves from one key to another, it 'modulates'. Modulation is that process. Articulation The 'style' a note is played in. I'm finding this harder to define, but think short, sharp notes vs. long, smooth ones. Articulation is the style a note is played in. Accidentals Sharps, flats and naturals which pop up through the music, and are ...


4

The key to this section is the term "Senza tempo", which means "not in tempo", or in other words that this is completely free decoration. The rising arpeggio in the left hand can be taken leisurely, and the small notes can start when you feel like, and at the speed you feel like (usually pretty fast though). Really they are a variant form of trill, which ...


3

Accidentals are signs that are put just before a note to tell musicians to change the pitch (how high or low a sound is).The type of sign used shows how to change it. 1) The flat (♭) lowers the pitch by a semitone 2) The sharp (♯) raises the pitch by a semitone 3) The natural (♮) cancels any previous sign You can refer to the below site for more reference ...


3

When you play in 4/4 time, which is the most common, beat 1 is emphasised by playing it a bit louder than the other three. Often beat 3 is also a bit louder. So - 1 is pressed hardest, 3 the next level down, with 2 and 4 the relatively quiet ones. Usually this is quite subtle, but sometimes when learning a new piece, it's helpful to emphasise beat 1 to keep ...


3

I assume that this person already understands the stave and can, slowly and methodically, translate between a stave position, a note name, and its position on an instrument (that is, which key to play, which fret to hold, etc. depending on the instrument). I assume this because they're simple concepts. What he needs is practice; and to encourage him to ...


2

This answer is a bit of personal color to complement, perhaps, user15590. I'm an adult piano learner, building on music I learned in school as a child. Based on my early education, I came to piano expecting that 'a beat was a beat', except, perhaps, in some soppy sloppy playing of an overly romantic nature. My piano teacher, a woman of endless patience, ...


2

My grandfather was a pianist with extremely large hands (I don't know what he could reach), but he always said the pianist with small hands were lucky. He felt his large hands were a disadvantage and he had to work a lot harder to get them to do what was needed. Reaching chords is just one small aspect of what is needed to play well.


2

With a "MIDI keyboard", you are not going to learn the basics of piano but rather of keyboard play. Basically all keyboards that have action seriously suitable for actual piano play also have their own sound generators and more often than not built-in amplifiers. While they may also sport MIDI output, using that is optional and, short of rather high ...


2

I have a book of Easy Dave Brubeck pieces for piano that is quite good for novice pianists. Of course everything is simplified but, the melodies and progressions are there. The book contains 20+ easily recognizable pieces. I doubt anyone will disagree with the idea that Brubeck is Jazz... ...


2

It sounds like in the case of learning simple written music, you are relying primarily on muscle memory. This means that your brain has memorized the series of movements, rather than a series of conscious decisions, in order to perform a piece. When you look down at your hands, your conscious mind gets in the way of the largely unconscious process that is ...


2

It puts your visual analysis in gear and makes you conscious of your movements. But watching your movements arrives with a delay and detachment as opposed to initiating your movements: for anything but trivial play, movements are anticipated, so the brain activity in the motoric region precedes the actual action while your watching it trails in behind. You ...


2

As a harpsichordist and pianist, I can say switching from piano to harpsichord should not pose any significant challenges. I started playing keys on an 88 key keyboard, and then went on to transition to harpsichord, and then a grand piano. As Tim mentions, dynamics do not exist on a harpsichord. Anything that you can play on a piano you'll be able to play ...


2

Your right hand will not be quite well prepared. It's more like your key-finding head is somewhat prepared. The piano keyboard is not as much velocity-sensitive as it is momentum-sensitive: you need to transfer a certain momentum in order to arrive at a certain loudness (unweighted or "semi-weighted" velocity-sensitive keyboards are not really an adequate ...


2

Playing melody and underlying chords on piano is somewhat easier than on guitar. All the notes you need on piano are there to be reached - within reason! Voicing is simpler because physically the chosen notes fall under the fingers/thumbs. On guitar, it's more tricky, as where a melody note/s are fretted usually dictates where the underlying harmonies will ...


2

Yes, you can learn on that instrument. No, it is not exactly the same as a real piano.


2

The short answer is, yes, a skilled pianist should be able to "sightread" a piece of music at some pretty high percentage of their skill level. Nobody can sightread a concerto, but if you put a piece of piano music in front of me, the determining factor in whether I can play it is the state of my technique, not my ability to read the notes. I found that ...


1

Well, the pedals suffer the same problem as the bellows of an accordion: they apply to all voices equally. So their use for effect gets in the way of polyphonic articulation. As an example, there does not seem to be a musical problem with using the sustain pedal in the Prelude #1 in the Well-Tempered Clavier, but you can't really make coherent use of it in ...


1

No experience on a proper harpsichord, but my piano (electronic) has a harpsichord setting. Obviously the sound is fine, but it also disables the touch sensitivity. So from that aspect, it's possibly easier to play stuff, as dynamics don't exist! Since I play fairly percussively and dynamically on piano, it feels odd that nothing happens! Action wise - don't ...


1

Proprietary/Commercial: Finale, Sibelius Free: MuseScore, Lilypond Finale can import scanned scores. MuseScore is acceptable for small projects, but for larger ones you should probably buy software. Long run, it is worth the investment because the free programs tend to have bugs and this slows down production, at least I have found it so.


1

I think it depends on how you learn a piece. Sometimes you might learn a piece by learning all the particular movements related to each other. Playing these and these notes on these beats and so on. However, most of the time, pianists will learn one hand, then the other. Ultimately they will try to learn one well enough, so playing that part almost ...


1

There's a difference between amateur and pro, and a difference between a self-taught musician and one who has had proper lessons.The four definitions are not interchangeable. Whilst it may be expected that self-taughts are amateurs, consider most pop-type bands. The Beatles were considered pros! And a lot of those who had proper lessons end up as amateur ...



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