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15

Is this handwritten or printed? Is the notation of German origin? In German, the notes E flat and A flat are called Es and As.


15

Closer inspection revealed the words "DAMPP CHASER". Some Googling revealed that it must be a Piano Life Saver dehumidifier, made by Dampp-Chaser.


12

Counting is an absolutely necessary step when learning a new piece.It is the rhythmic framework of any piece. Without it, you may well be playing a different tune. 'All the right notes, but not in the right timing'. You ask 'do they count all the time?' Well there's no need once a piece is well known to the player. We sound out words as kids, but eventually ...


8

As you beginner, I strongly suggest you keep doing that. What I did when I first begun, was to count everything with my foot. After a while, I didn't really need to count every single thing with the foot, because I could hear/feel it in me. So, no, I don't think pro musicians count every little thing, but they can if you ask them to. Is counting the ...


7

I agree that it's probably a sus4 chord, but if it's hand-written, could the "s" possibly be a "5" and it's a power chord? Only other kind of far-out thought...


6

This is much like: when you drive a car, do you think about the steering all the time? When you learn to drive, you will be consciously thinking about your steering. Similarly, an experienced driver on an unfamiliar road will be consciously thinking about it. An experienced driver on a familiar road will probably not be consciously considering their ...


6

Yes, this is a common problem for anyone who's ever trying to do more than one thing at a time (which for musicians, is quite often). You have to be nice to your brain. Take it slow, painfully, agonizingly slow In fact, don't even play in time. I suggest breaking down the physical motions into their most basic components, and explain what needs to happen ...


6

After doing a little bit of digging, I found a source* that uses the s instead of the full sus symbol to notate a suspended chord. They always put the number next to it, but a sus alone indicates a sus4 so I would imagine that they would be equivalent. I would still like to see the context just to be sure but I think it is pretty likely. * I don't really ...


6

Exactly --- it's a dehumidifying appliance. It creates some heat to keep the air drier inside the instrument body. There are also "humidifiers", but they do the opposite thing, and typically have plastic piping and a water reservoir and are most often found on grand pianos instead of console/studio models.


4

There is nothing really complicated about these chords. What I think is throwing you off is that some of the chords are missing 5ths and some notes are above the staff. Here is the basic analysis of the chords broken down by measure: C | D7 Em | Am7/G Em/B | F#m/A Gmaj7sus2/A | C/G D/F# | C | C5/G Em/B | F#/A Gmaj7sus2/A | C/G ...


4

Could it maybe be German (or Dutch)? Because in this case it would mean Eb and Ab (i.e. E flat and A flat). And in this case 'Es' would refer to an Eb major triad, and 'As' refers to an Ab major triad.


4

"Impressionist composers should be banned from using water as inspiration. Just way too many notes." - don't shoot the pianist In these circumstances, the composer's manuscript is always a valuable tool to use to determine why a publisher made the decision to do something the way they did. In this case, the manuscript is fortunately available to us ...


4

If you have trouble with counting meter, you might want to try a rhythm solfege method like Takadimi or the Kodaly Method. I played with an Indian tabla player for a couple of years and found tabla rhthym solfege to be superior to the Western "1-e-and-a" counting for me in performance, possibly because I block on numbers (can't remember phone numbers) but ...


4

I don't think this has anything to do with his age. Everyone except savants start out taking a long time to recognize notes on the staff, in the same way that toddlers might take a long time to recognize letters in a book. The only answer is to have him practice. Simple practice is best to start. Something like flashcards is ideal, and what my teacher ...


3

Not really, the fingers should be all you need. For example, to notate the cross on a scale, indicating "1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5" suffices to indicate a thumb-under-3 cross. And since you can pretty safely assume that each finger in order is going to play each note, you can leave out everything except the crosses. For an ascending C major scale in the right hand, ...


3

I believe this depends on the performer/composer. There are songs that the melody is just being sung and there are songs that the melody is being sung and played at the piano (or some other instrument). Also, sometimes the melody is being played on the piano before the singer starts singing it. If the composer wants to do something specific, this will most ...


3

There is a lot of sheet music available which has 3 lines of manuscript. The lower two are the standard treble and bass clef that most people know from piano music, and the top line is often treble clef, and has the melody line, usually with the lyrics. Looking at the middle line, you'll find that the top line is often duplicated, but there are also other ...


2

Babu's answer contains the canonical answer, it is a double sharp used to sharpen a note that has already had a sharp applied. I can see how it is hard to find these things, when we see the symbol on the page what on earth would we type into a search engine? This is where visual lists of musical symbols come in useful. Wikipedia provides one such list of ...


2

The puzzle connected with the legato slur is "fingering": use different fingers for each pairs of notes so that you could play them slightly overlapping. Theoretically, the notes should be tied seamlessly. But for many keyboard instruments it's more feasible to "hide" the key release action in the attack of the next note. For a piano, the timing is not ...


2

You might try "ghosting" the note by playing the extra note but muting it with your left hand. When you can do that comfortably, then try just thinking about ghosting the note. I've used this workaround a number of times when learning syncopation.


2

Yes, you are. For complete beginners, it is way easier to use the thumb on a black key than to deal with the massive complication of a change of position, and at the slow tempo and extremely easy texture of the piece, there isn't much risk of damage through hours of practicing in an unergonomic position.


2

Agreed. Counting is necessary until you have internalised the time. Improvising in 7 is fine as long as you've spent enough time getting used to this number of beats. It would be difficult in the extreme to improvise well and be counting at the same time.


2

In simplest terms, MIDI is the message system used by the equipment. USB is the physical communication link over which those messages are sent. The P105 is "MIDI-compliant", in that it will transmit and receive standard MIDI messages; what it lacks is the older DIN 5-pin connectors traditionally used to connect MIDI-compliant hardware (as well as a host of ...


2

Learning the notes on any staff is a lot of memorization at first. There are a lot of little tricks to remember what each line and space is on the staff, but it can be a lot to learn at once. I've taught a few younger kids how to read the treble and bass clef (not any teenagers though) and while FACE and Every Good Boy Does Fine helps some it confuses ...


1

It should not be a issue of age. I myself have taught 8 year olds how to read music. Get yourself a good theory book and start counting notes. You learn this by doing. Write the numbers A B C D E F G out. Mention it to your student that when you go up on the staff you count forwards and when you go down you count backwards. It is tricky at first because ...


1

Practice and rehears over and over until it becomes second nature, I guess. I play guitar and when I started with music I was extremely bad in keeping rhythm, I couldn't even simply tap along with music. It was depressing. Somehow I picked it up over the years and now it is fairly acceptable. Rhythm/timing is an important part of music, wrong rhythm/timing ...


1

Pros don't count everything off, and there would be no time for it, either. One example you can't count is playing things like 4 notes against 3 notes (the "pass the goddamn butter" pattern). If you wanted to count that off, you'd need to count it as 4 notes of 3 blips length each against 3 notes of 4 blips length each, for a total of 12 blips. You can't ...


1

I agree with everything everyone has said above. Just to add to what they've already said, sometimes its just better to play by ear. For example, if your wanting to sing and play an Adele song, like "No One Like You", you can replicate the same version if you just play what's on the recording. It is easier said than done, but you have a lot more flexibility ...


1

It has to be noted that much piano sheet music is not designed for accompanists, but for solo players, so has a tendency to include the melody in the top line, rather than being a literal translation of the original piano part [if any] I would tend to treat this type of sheet music as a guide rather than an absolute, & work from memory as to what the ...


1

With modern techniques, there are almost as many methods as ideas Before technology we had just... Think it up, write it on paper Play it, write it on paper, then Perform it live, to as many people as possible Now we also have Play, record it. Think about how to structure it later. physically edit the audio into your preferred form, or Transcribe it, ...



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