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5

I'm not sure if you're interested in classical examples, but this kind of thing happens all the time in Baroque music, almost to the point of being ubiquitous. One quick example that pops to mind is this section from Brandenburg Concerto #2. Start the passage right at (or slightly before) 2:00 (apparently SE doesn't honor t=### tags in youtube links). This ...


4

Other editions make it clearer: trill each note, starting on the note rather than the auxiliary (where he specifies it with an accacciatura). You can see it in Scharwenka's edition here. Edit: I should clarify this a bit: Chopin is using accacciature in this passage to specify the starting notes of the trills.


2

While Matt's answer is not wrong, I would include a few other thoughts. My initial thought was that this could be a Common Tone Diminished chord. From my experience, this is something that has typically been associated with the Classical repertoire but could certainly be applied elsewhere. This would specifically apply to fully diminished 7 chords, not ...


2

The point of unequal well-tempered tunings is that the keys don't sound the same. Temperaments like Werckmeister III or Vallotti or 18th century French ordinaire are meant to be usable in any key while letting each have its own colour. (Vallotti is quite commonly used on fortepianos.) For most of what you're doing, you could probably get away with a mean ...


2

Equal temperament is key-agnostic. Well-tempered tuning isn't. The point of well-tempered tuning is that all keys are tolerable, but some are still better than others and each has its own character. This own character was pretty much the whole point of Bach's "Wohltemperirtes Clavier" (it is usually assumed that some Werckmeister tuning reflects the ...


2

The one that immediately comes to mind for me is the jazz tune "Autumn Leaves." It was originally written in Gm, but for analysis purposes it's easier to think of in, say, Em. In that case the chord progression goes Am7 - D7 - Gmaj7 - Cmaj7 - F#m7b5 - B7 - Em7 (ivm7-VII7-IIImaj7-VIMaj7-iim7b5-V7-im7) - and there's your diatonic 4-7-3-6-2-5-1 progression ...


1

A vacuum cleaner. True story: a friend of mine used to be an organ tuner. So he was there in a church, doing the final intonation of the registers (that's even after the tuning, making sure that all of a register responds in style and consistently) and all the personnel had been notified of the requirements for absolute silence. So he is working on this ...


1

the chord tones for #IVdim are: #iv, vi, i , ##ii (where these refer to scale degrees). This contains two tones that are already part of Imaj6: vi, i And it contains two tones that lead into two more Imaj basic chord tones: iv# --> v ii## -->iii so you have a chord that has two leading tones into the target chord, this is why it is a natural choice of ...


1

Enharmonically this is the same as Idim7 -> I(maj7), which is a common progression (at least in jazz or jazzy arrangements). One famous example is the beginning of the jazz standard Misty by Erroll Garner. If you really have #IVdim7 -> I(maj7) then you probably actually have #IVdim7 -> I(with 5 in the bass), so the bassline moves up chromatically.


1

Especially in minor you'll find this progression quite often, actually so often that it has become a cliché which many people try to avoid. One example of this progression (in minor) is "Still Got The Blues" by Gary Moore (in A minor, so it starts on the D minor chord). The II chord (which would be the VII chord of the relative major key) is a ...


1

I am a Registered Piano Technician with the Piano Technicians Guild. Pianos go out of tune during a move due to humidity differences and/or the different shape of the floor. The floor can slightly twist the piano which knocks it out. Now, let's be reasonable here. Was this piano tuned every four months? Are you going to keep tuning it every four months? ...


1

I'd leave it for a week or so, as it's in a different environment - may be warmer, colder, more/less humid than its last home. Then get it tuned. You may have a nasty little surprise, especially if it's a wooden frame, when the tuner says he can't bring it back to concert pitch. Maybe he will over two or three tunings - maybe it doesn't matter to you, but if ...



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