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9

Releasing notes after the correct duration is all part of practising. Just as the attack of a note starting at the right time is important, so is the release. I practice this by slowing the tempo right down, by half or even more. Whatever you need to give yourself enough 'thinking time'. Then really focus on each note length and when notes in each voice get ...


7

Widor's suggestion of slowing down is great. Another than can be used in conjunction with it or on its own is to play staccato. Staccato obviously necessitates lifting your fingers back off the keys, and it will change the sound drastically to ensure that you are concentrating on it. It also has the added benefit of building strength, which can help you ...


6

The C and A Altered Dorian scales you show, are simply Dorian Modes with fourth degrees raised by a Semitone. So, to work out the Altered Dorians starting on the other pitches: firstly, work out the Dorian modes starting on each of these pitches; secondly, raise the fourth degree of each of these modes by a semitone. There are two easy ways to work out the ...


4

A few caveats to buying sheet music: Music for "piano/guitar/voice" often does not have the complete guitar version. If you are a guitarist, look for TABs to lend a possible greater authenticity. If the music is labeled EASY or something similar, then it is unlikely to be anywhere near authentic. Some sheet music will leave out the melody, some will not. ...


4

You can focus much more easily on the dynamics by making everything else easier (and thus either automatic or requiring little attention). You could practise playing this way with a simpler piece or one you already know well. Slowing down is also very effective — as a extreme example, if you're only pressing one note every 10 seconds is makes it ...


3

Great responses. I recommend the following (I used to do this often): Take any given passage that involves that "finger stuck" problem. Using the correct fingering as if you would normally play it (it would be helpful to write down the correct fingering if you are not comfortable remembering it), play those two notes (thumb and index finger) while also ...


3

As a mature (elderly?) learner, I faced a similar difficulty about a year ago, and found these ideas helped: With the "quiet" hand, keep the fingers as close to the keys as possible at all times (if possible, make sure that they never actually lose contact with the keys) and lift the fingers of the other hand off the keys before playing the note (loudly). ...


2

I like Topo Morto's answer, but here's what I'd like to add: To learn to feel and play any new style of music, the best thing you can do is listen. That is, after all, almost certainly how you first became familiar with what you're already used to. Try to find CDs or records (if that's what you're into) of or purchase digital copies online of albums or ...


2

A large number of Isaac Albeniz pieces were originally written for piano, then transcribed (with his approval) by Tarrega for the classical guitar. These pieces are now part of the standard repertoire for guitar. My favourites are probably "Cordoba" and "Asturias(Leyenda)" - you'll find them recorded everywhere. Now I mention it, you might like to search ...


2

Bach Prelude BWV 938 I googled Bach e minor and looked at images. ...


1

The diploma syllabus gives a full list of requirements and the equivalent qualifications from other boards. The DipABRSM requires grade 8 practical, which requires grade 5 theory. Grades from other boards are accepted but it also notes that grade 5 theory is required in addition, though from any board. All the higher diplomas require lower ones, so ...


1

To my mind scales and arpeggios are something you should consider. There's a lot written about them in various answers on this site, but from your angle, they will help to create independence between the fingers of each hand, and each hand itself. As the fingering for each scale is different, (when looking at each hand), as you play, although the notes will ...


1

When starting to work on any technique like this, I've found it's good to isolate it down to something so incredibly simple that you are focusing only on the technique and its clarity and not at all on the happenings of a piece. You can use a very simple five finger exercises you already know very well (ex. Hanon 1), but to start, I would recommend just ...


1

This depends on the arrangement. Often you will see music which has scores for piano and one singer, with chords over the score. In which case you can expect the piano part to sound fine on its own. If there are notes in place for all parts, you can probably expect there to have been more thought put in to how the parts play together and interact. Removing ...



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