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11

Basically, yes - callouses are your body's protection against damage (that it could incur from pressing hard on the strings, which cut into your flesh) As you become more proficient, you will learn how to press only as hard as is needed, and no more - this will help a lot, but you will still have harder pads on your fingertips. Nylon strung guitars ...


8

Part of the problem is that beginners are trying to learn at least three different things at the same time: How to read sheet music How to play their instrument How to play the specific piece that is in front of them. If you concentrate mostly on #3, then learning #1 and #2 will be slower, and (relatively) unstructured and disorganized. You need to work ...


7

Some people's calluses seem to be semi-permanent, but others will quickly lose them after a period without playing. There is some related discussion here. However, your concern about tone on the piano is unfounded. Piano keys are not so sensitive that the toughness of your skin is a factor; you have to depress them far more than your finger pads would ...


3

My response might be more abstract than what you are looking for, but I think it's ultimately a healthier mentality. I've included a more concrete example of its implementation at the end. In my opinion, approaching music with a 'lick'-based mentality tends to limit your ability to be open and interactive with yourself and the ensemble/band. I find if more ...


2

The ultimate goal is to feel each rhythm independently – triplet in one hand, duplet in the other. There are multiple ways to get there, but the Carol of the Bells example given above is great. Sing the rhythm in syllables (dum da dee da), and clap both hands on your lap. Both hands start together on "dum," right hand "da," left hand "dee," and right hand on ...


2

There really isn't a best way of learning new pieces, at least not one that all piano teachers and pedagogues would agree on. Some insist that learning hands together is best, and others insist that learning each hand separately is better, so really it tends to boil down to which method works best for you, or which method your teacher advises. From my own ...


2

First off, if you are renting where you live, then there's a limit on what you can do that will be effective. The most effective things you can do require modifications and therefore ownership. A little bit of physics: When you play, the piano vibrates the air, the air hits the wall and starts the wall vibrating, some of the energy gets absorbed by the wall ...


2

An observation about 88 notes on the piano... You can play through the entire major key circle of fifths on the piano starting on the lowest C to the highest C; AND You can play through the entire minor key circle of fifths on the piano starting on the lowest A to the highest A. Interesting how this worked out perfectly!


2

Use a smaller note head for the non-melody notes. This would be easy to sight read. Or you could write an additional ossia-type line showing just the melody notes. In either case, an explanation won't hurt. If you only need it for this one measure, you can just write it out: "highlight notes such and such".


1

I think the neatest way to do this is almost what you did in your example: use a different style of notehead for the emphasized notes. Of course this breaks "the rules" about note lengths, but it should be obvious to most players what it means. You could add a note explaining that the "white" noteheads in the chords should be emphasized. Incidentally, ...


1

If you're really keen on not developing callouses at all, I think the best way would be to soak your fingers in water (maybe with Epsom salts? or just moisturizing soap?) after practicing to let the skin really soften and re-hydrate. Let 'em get prune-y. Then dry thoroughly, let them un-prune, and apply whatever lotion or handcream you usually use. ...


1

Are we talking about "piano lesson" playing, or about learning songs? If the former yes, hands seperately, slowly enough to get it RIGHT (and if it isn't right, sort out why - don't just keep making the same fluffs). But if you're learning songs (which "sheet music" suggests you might be) it can be more about finding out how it "goes" and working out what ...


1

From my own experience (I've been separated from the piano for 5 years), you'll need one or two months to fully recover. That is something which has stayed in your brain and muscles. As Czerny said : "One should never have to relearn (technique, especially, EdN) what he already had". Now, I'd say it's even better to step away, from times to times, and ...


1

Considering your prior level (Inventions, Fur Elise, etc.), prior amount of practice per week (3 hours), amount of time off (4 years), and current age (17?), you should not have any difficulty picking right back up almost within the first month, maybe even 1-2 weeks. Find a good teacher, listen to that teacher, and enjoy. I promise you that what you're doing ...


1

Very large chords like the one you mention are quite common in fact in classical romantic music piano literature. Basics about this issue is, play like an arpeggio (alephzero answer). Most pianists do that indeed. This is absolutely normal, as even pianists with very long fingers can't reach some insane chords (see image; La Campanella from Lizst). ...


1

Here are the main reasons why legato fingering is advised: There are many times when a note (or notes) is sustained through a pedal change. Sometimes this happens during a harmonic change in the underlying notes, while the melodic note must sustain through to the new harmony. The sustained note can be anywhere, but usually in the melodic and bass lines. ...


1

Today my six year old played a few wrong notes while practicing from his song book. We both looked at each other in surprise, because those notes formed the backbone of another song we had recently heard. I said, "hey, let's pick out the rest of this song by ear." It only took a few tries to discover the first line of the melody. We were stumped at the end ...



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