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11

You can find examples of both color schemes, and others, throughout history. It all depends on what was popular at the time and what a customer wanted to order. Early on, in Europe, the "natural" keys were made of ebony or ebony veneer, while the "accidental keys" were of plain maple. Later on, it became possible and affordable to import elephant ivory ...


5

These are definitely triplet subdivisions, not duple 32nds. With experience, you can tell the difference even at fast tempos like this. If I was doing this transcription, however, I would take a very different approach. I would either write in swing 8ths, 4/4 at q=206, or I would keep the meter the same and make a note up at the top indicating "swing ...


4

Uh, no, those are two proper treble clefs and there is no reason you should not be playing both parts at the written pitch with both hands. There is no such thing as "too crowded" for polyphonic play. You should be glad that you don't have to interpret two parts in one hand (which often happens with Bach keyboard music): it's much easier to maintain two ...


3

If I'm not mistaken, both of the books have some stuff in common, but the theory is book is focusing solely on theory (duh), whereas the piano book focuses on the piano. The theory book has some stuff about the piano and vice versa, but both have stuff the other book doesn't. I would suggest that if you have the money (they cost around 30-40$ on Amazon), you ...


3

why so many answers say clavichord? this was originally intended for harpischord, where you might (or might not) have had two manuals (keyboards). of course, it can be played on organ, clavichord, and piano, but easily works on one keyboard. It's a bit awkward. You have to plan out the choreography, but it really isn't terribly difficult. One hand plays ...


3

While I don't say that it is easy (and I'm not even going to try to do it myself), you'll notice that all the notes are on white keys. The usual way to play these is to play between two keys with one finger, striking the two notes at once. (Prokofiev loved to do horrible things like this.) As A. Jiménez says, it's not a glissando; you can't do this by ...


2

Well, it's not a glissando. That passage mimics in some way the effect of a glissando, but definitely, it's not. One way of percieve it, it's that not all notes are double notes, but there's an alternation between single and double notes, which makes it impossible to play using glissando technique. Now, how is she able to play that passage? Marta Argerich ...


1

I play those with 5 on most of the upper notes, and a 4 here and there on a black key... thumb on the lower note except when it's a black key then usually 2. Practice them blocked (i.e., as an interval sounded together) then open to play as written.


1

The great pianist Walter Gieseking advocated using visualization techniques. One form of visualization (advocated by the pianist Walter Gieseking) is to study the score of the peice until you know it so well that you could sit down with a blank sheet of manuscript paper and write it out from memory. No simple undertaking! Gieseking even advised doing ...


1

I recently bought a Dolmetsch spinet harpsicord after playing piano my entire life. As I just retired I was going to build a harpsicord but found the spinet. I have found the touch to be very different. Of course, there are no dynamic changes or pedals so there is an interpretive learning curve. However the greater difference is the care the harpsicord ...


1

For me this isn't terribly difficult. Play the lower staff with the left hand, the upper staff with the right. I use 2 and 4 in each hand since they are more even in length. However, I might change that to take the F# in the left hand with 3. Play right hand over left, not left over right. It's harder to hit the G# in the right hand when reaching ...



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