Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

The synth patches that you want will exist if you build them yourself. :) You might consider studying some of the older musicians such as Keith Emerson and Rick Wakeman. At that time, people usually rolled their own sounds, building them from the basic four waveforms. Also, you might read up on "additive synthesis" which has to do with the theory behind ...


5

I think subtle expression possibilities is the key. Piano, electric piano and organs have a large and very finely controllable dynamic sound range1 (either by true continuous 𝆑𝆓𝆏 spectrum right "at the fingertips", or lots of of possible organ stop/drawbar combinations), so you can always counteract where it might get tiresome, without however necessarily ...


5

There's a boogie pattern 1-3-5-6-b7-6-5-3- used for 12 bar blues. Walking bass patterns (usually on each beat) use all the notes from the scale of the key you're in,- you can use any order, preferably starting a bar with the root note. Theory says that there's a good chance one or two of the other notes in the bar will fit the chord, even random notes ! But ...


4

Interesting - there is a 'top down' for guitar music. I'm thinking of popular guitar tunes, rather than classical guitar. People who self-teach generally start off learning chord shapes which will enable you to strum your way through a song. A lot of guitar tutorials work this way. You can also learn "basic" chords which will work, and add more intricacy ...


4

I would suggest schools, but more and more schools are getting rid of their pianos. However, if you find one, ask about seeing the caretaker and going in at holidays (now!) or weekends. Some pubs may provide, and maybe you could play in the background when punters are in. Occasionally rehearsal studios (not cheap) have a real piano.Colleges , especially ...


3

You're probably right. Even the most wonderful non-piano/organ synth patch would be too much if used for an entire concert (as would panpipes though). Many advanced synth performers will often tweak the patch as they play, equipment permitting. Sound wise, most synth sounds are going to emulate instruments that are either struck, plucked, bowed or blown, ...


3

Well, obviously the average usual piano is easier to play in the C major, but not in other keys On keyboards, digital pianos and even some rare acoustic pianos it is possible to use transpose feature if some other key seems much easier to play. I have learned some chord progressions with transposition first to make easier, but then re-learned to get ...


3

You could program a MIDI device to play pitches this way when triggered from a regular MIDI keyboard. (For instance, to only have semitones on the white keys, and not to use the black keys - this would reduce the range of course.) It would make a nonsense of the repeating pattern of black and white keys though…! These would no longer have the same pattern ...


2

I've looked into this before, and there really don't seem to be any keyboards like this available apart from the Jankó Keyboard. Whether that's because it's really a bad idea or more because the current layout being a heavily established convention I couldn't say for sure, but when I compared the pros and cons A few years ago, it did come out with quite a ...


2

Trouble is, in the middle area, how would you know which black or which white note was the one you wanted to play? The idea of 2 blacks/space/3 blacks is to see a pattern to help. As in the note(s) in between the 2 blacks are all D. Your idea may work if there is colour coding as in a harp. If all the Cs, say, were red then it would help navigate round. ...


2

As a classically-trained pianist who is now beginning to learn jazz piano, I would recommend taking classical piano lessons because with that comes classical music theory which is an important thing to understand, regardless of your chosen style. Once you are suitably adept with classical piano, you could then begin to learn the features and practices of ...


2

I once asked a famous violinist this same question, and this is what he said to me: If you only learn the technique for a certain piece, you need to begin anew with every piece that you learn. If you achieve technical mastery before the music, learning the piece becomes a matter of applying your technique. All that said, it's not fun drilling etudes for ...


2

There is no need to train on exercises only. My piano teacher gives real songs and exercises in somewhat 50 : 50 % proportion. Many really nice piano pieces like "Love me Tender" or "Jingle Bells" or "Let it Be" melody line are actually not so difficult to play. There is no lack in "easy piano" books with adapted, simplified versions of really great, real ...


2

Just a few notes: What Tim describes as "a boogie pattern" some people call the money-walk and it varies slightly, sometimes walking half-steps up and down from the 3rd to the 5th and occasionally touching on the flattened 5th. Play around with this one, it's (over)used in 50s and 60s rock quite a bit. A common country bass-line (some call it the eat-shit ...


1

schools, churches, nursing homes. that's probably about it. nursing homes have sort of gone to digitals or else you may find their acoustic way out of tune. but it's worth a shot. you'll definitely have an appreciative audience. other than that, pony up the cash and buy one, or make do with your digital. My cp-33 is fine for me, at least. I like to ...


1

No idea on the accuracy or validity of this information, sorry: http://streetpianos.com/london2012 says some are still available. Failing that, these look reasonably priced: http://www.jspianos.com/hire/practice-room-hire - I might use them myself next time I'm working in London, since real pianos kinda scare me.


1

Part of the reason is that synths are most often used in electronic music, which is usually highly polyphonic and emphasizes the interactions between multiple layers instead of focusing on one sound. As a result, synth sounds aren't created to be powerful across the entire realm of musical functions, but instead to do one thing really well and play nicely ...


1

It sounds as if you're trying to plunge into ``real'' music headfirst. You might want to begin with easier pieces instead, designed for beginners to practice. There is plenty of free sheet music for entry level on the web. I myself find Carl Czerny's practical method really helpful in the sense that it is both manageable and challenging for a beginner. Ans ...


1

Your keyboard scheme basically is a simplified Jankó keyboard missing a significant number of its chord and transposing possibilities. While rare versions of it can be found, you are likely going to have more success with a chromatic button accordion. There are actually Midi keyboards, even new ones, with CBA to be found. I actually have a C-Griff Solton ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible