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6

If you are playing an organ sound, you might want a keyboard that can feel and respond like an organ, rather than a piano It's possible to make a very shallow non-weighted action, which is helpful for some techniques (I like it better for triggering percussive sounds, for example) It's cheaper to make, so instruments are cheaper. The instrument is ...


3

Being able to play one grade 4 piece does not mean you will be able to play all of them. The C minor prelude looks and sounds harder than it actually is, in my opinion (as someone who has learned to play the piece). I would say the overall difficulty level between the two is comparable, although as Dr Mayhem commented, the pieces do very different things ...


3

What I've found is that the acoustic piano is the most expressive when played softly. We all like loud, but anything can be loud and the ear will tune loud OUT after a while. But it pays attention when things get quiet. And that's where weighted keys really help - on a digital too. If you don't have that weight, you'll get a more frequent oops-BANG ...


2

Hammer action is noisier. Of course it is dwarfed by the sounds you hear, but when you have excellent reason for playing through headphones, that reason might also make light action desirable. Also if your main instrument is not a grand piano but a harmonium or accordion or organ, there is no point in an percussive attack, and it may detract from the fine ...


2

There's a possibility of something touching the string; either some foreign body dropped in there & wedged against it, or even part of the mechanism touching the string. I'd recommend visual inspection first. Grab a torch, get the front off & go have a look. Very gently wiping down the length of the string with a lint-free cloth may help - be ...


1

This type of noise can be hard to track down, because it might not be coming from the piano at all. It could be almost anything in the room resonating at the pitch of the note. If your piano tuner changed the pitch, that's enough reason why the problem only started after the tuning. it's very hard to hear the direction the sound is really coming from, and ...


1

There is so much repertoire that is interesting and playable for someone in your position that it's hard to know where to begin. If it were me, knowing my own preferences, I would start with some of the more manageable J.S. Bach. The two-part inventions are playable for most people, but will require some patience and practice. They are extremely rewarding, ...


1

Piano is like math-- before you get to do the fun things like Calculus, you need to learn your basic operations and algebra. Foundation is very important, especially since you seem to be a first-time musician. You also need to build up finger dexterity and strength; sure, you may be able to "read" the music you want to play, but your technique is probably a ...


1

My experience of Yamaha uprights is that they are very good pianos for beginners (and especially young beginners) to learn on, because the touch is light and even and you can get a useful range of dynamics and tone colors without much physical effort. But to give an analogy with driving a small car, the acceleration is very good up to say 40 mph but after ...


1

Reasons 1 and 2, I think. Bach is popular enough in the West that I don't think that 3 really pertains: I don't think our fundamental wiring is any different. I think your biggest problem may be that Bach's music often comprises both linear polyphony and organised harmony at one and the same time. That gives it an extraordinary... call it "density of ...



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