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31

There are several reasons. When new strings are put into a piano, they slowly "stretch" or relax and go flat. In a day it will be out of tune. You have to tune it 2 or 3 times the first month. After a few months the strings will have settled in and will stay in tune better. If the pinblock is very old, the pins can slip, making the notes go flat. The ...


26

Your notation may work for a free form melody, but that's it. How will you notate several notes played at once? How will you notate exact rhythms if you don't split up a bar into beats and subbeats and give each note an exact duration? Which octaves are those notes? I agree that standard notation (common music notation) is complicated, but there are pretty ...


22

We most commonly use staff notation because it is a good compromise between expressiveness and readability for a wide range of music. There are alternatives, however these alternatives are specialized in one dimension or another, and thus, in a sense, less expressive than standard staff notation. The overall problems relate to the fundamental issues in ...


19

Everyone, when they first begin to learn to play an instrument with music notation, is puzzled by all the complexities and nuances. Music notation is the way that it is because it works well. You know so little about playing music at this point that you cannot fully appreciate all that is involved. The more you learn, the more sense it will make to you.


18

The "C" after the clef in place of the time signature stands for "Common Time," and it is shorthand for 4/4 time. If you see a "C" with a vertical line through it, that stands for "Cut Time," and it is shorthand for 2/2 time.


18

There are physical and psychoacoustics reasons behind it. A vibrating string held by its two extremities can only vibrate at certain frequencies (cycles per second, expressed in Hertz, i.e. 1/second), which relates to the characteristics of the string (e.g. its weight per unit of length, its flexibility) and how it is used (e.g. the vibrating length — which ...


18

If you would like to see a tour de force in the use of repeated notes, have a look at Martha Argerich's performance of Scarlatti's D Minor Sonata: You will notice that she uses 321321 ...


18

This question got me curious, so I started googling. Keyboard size is not officially standardized (there is no committee creating and enforcing standards), but in practice, there is very little variation. Browsing through forum topics on www.pianoworld.com, people measured 88 key keyboards from anywhere between 48 inches to 48 1/2". Wikipedia ...


16

It's effectively written as three parts. The treble clef is one line. The bass notes with tails going down is the bass part, comprising B minim and another B crotchet. Then there's the 'middle line', played with the left hand.Obviously it's a D minim, tail up, but that leaves the first beat of this bar with nothing to play. Thus a crotchet rest. You can't ...


15

I highly recommend reading What Every Pianist Needs to Know About the Body by Thomas Mark. The answer to this question has a lot to do with the action of the piano itself, but it has more to do with the way you move your muscles to play. The answer to your question is explained in detail in Chapter 7, entitled "Mapping The Piano". To paraphrase the first ...


15

Let's look at what going in the bass clef. You are playing a B for beats 1 and 2 and then playing another B on beat 3, but you also play a D for beats 2 and 3 in the bass. Because you play the D on beats 2 and 3 and the B is also being played on beats 1 and 2, the rest is used to show you what beat to start playing the D. Without the rest in, the notation ...


15

The notation you suggest is too simple for real scores, or on the contrary hand it would be nearly impossible to read. Try to translate this into your notation:


14

There are big differences between those two scales. The C major scale consists of the following notes: C D E F G A B The C minor scale consists of the following notes: C D Eb F G Ab Bb 3 of the 7 notes of the scale are different so it is not a small difference. It sounds to me like you need to take ear training classes. Ear training can make you ...


14

The synth patches that you want will exist if you build them yourself. :) You might consider studying some of the older musicians such as Keith Emerson and Rick Wakeman. At that time, people usually rolled their own sounds, building them from the basic four waveforms. Also, you might read up on "additive synthesis" which has to do with the theory behind ...


13

Yes, both piano music and recorder music are written with the same kind of music notation, using the same kinds of symbols. The pitch "A" on the piano and the same pitch "A" on the recorder are written with the same musical note in sheet music. I do not know, but I suspect that the problem your daughter is encountering is of a different nature: On the ...


13

The black and white bits are the same, except you will probably only get 49/61 of them instead of the 88 you're probably used to. The action will be rather different, too. No matter how loudly or quietly you try to play, the volume will remain the same. There is no sustain pedal, so that will be different, too. You'll have to acclimatise yourself to playing ...


13

If the only reason you want to learn piano is for ONE song at your wedding, I'd say don't go down that road. A non-sucky wedding song is usually at least intermediate level. Pay someone to do it right. Then learn the piano later if you're up for the amount of time and money that takes. Are you going to be ABLE to practice for several hours a week? Are ...


12

Your fallacy here is in thinking that "people with much less talent than myself are considered stronger musicians just because they know the "right" fingerings?" Listen more closely to what you have actually been told: "they say that the fingerings are an absolute must." Unless you've left something out, they never actually said you are a worse musician for ...


12

No, the notes don't all go out of tune at the same rate, and the notes that get hit more often do go out of tune a bit more quickly. Piano strings are strung at one end so as not to move, and on the other end they are held by "pins" (more like pegs) wedged very tightly into a "pinblock", which is a very hard piece of wood with holes in it. When a piano ...


11

Music is a performing art, and a performance is not (should not be) an acoustic "printout" of the score. Each performer gives each piece's performance his/her own personal touch, timing, energy, and interpretation. Each recording environment (be it a studio, or specific concert hall) affects the character of the performance. I'm not saying that every ...


11

First question : there is no rule, no "max limit" between notes. Sometime you'll have to figure out yourself the way you spread the notes between your two hands (try the Bach chorales... you're a conductor with four voices, the relative heights of the notes are written relative to the singer's tessitura, not the keybord player's hands). You'll also face ...


11

All F's should be sharp unless they have accidentals.


11

Connectors section at Specifications tab on this page contains the following: PEDAL (DAMPER/R, SOFT/L *, SOSTENUTO/C *) So I'll presume, that those are the pedals required for the answer. As stated at Piano pedals article on Wikipedia: Modern pianos usually have three pedals, from left to right, the soft pedal (or una corda), the sostenuto pedal ...


11

In piano, the staffs usually signifies what hand plays what note where the lower staff would be your left hand and the upper staff would be your right hand. While the clefs are important, you may see the same two clefs on a grand staff. In Imagine you can see there are two bass clefs because the piano part is low. It is kind of an unwritten rule of thumb in ...


11

The short answer to this question is that musical notation evolved over centuries in a relatively haphazard way. Many aspects of it are optimized for situations that no longer exist, or assume limitations on musical conduct that we no longer respect. A lot of it is arbitrary (why five lines on a staff?). To take a most obvious example: the clefs that we ...


11

It's obvious when you think about it, but the biggest difference between an organ and a piano is the way their sounds decay. A piano is a hammer hitting a string. The loudest sound is right at the beginning, and from there on the sound decays organically as the string returns to rest. If you let the dampers do their thing, the decay is shortened, but it's ...


11

The figure in the Wikipedia article tells you what you are asking, if you're willing to tabulate the deviations by reading the green line. The vertical axis is the number of cents that the key is tuned away from equal temperament, e.g. the C two octaves above A440 (C7) is about 10 cents sharp, i.e. the frequency is a factor of 210/1200 sharp, or the actual ...


11

It is a little hard to tell without seeing the music, but these are unlikely to be time-signatures and marcato markings. The "^" is probably a variable pedal mark, particularly if it is connected to the lines showing the pedal markings. This page shows how this is usually used, it More accurately indicates the precise use of the sustain pedal. The ...


11

In many ways, everything about playing the piano is about creating illusions. The minute you play a note it begins to decay, yet we find ways of creating the illusion of phrasing. The instrument is percussive, yet we find ways to make it seem more vocal or orchestral. Playing a group of legato notes that don't change pitch is also an illusion and we have to ...


10

Yes, but this phenomenon is easily explained by classical physics. If you hold down the sustain pedal on a piano (thus releasing the strings to vibrate freely), any instrument nearby playing a tone that is matched by one of the piano strings will cause that string to vibrate in sympathy. The tone provided by the voice, trombone, second piano, violin, etc. ...



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