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73

My teacher instructed me to think of two different approaches to practice: "Stop" -- where you are trying to learn the piece, work out the fingering (or other technical aspects) etc. You're not too concerned with keeping time, and when you make a mistake you stop, go back (maybe to the beginning of the phrase) and fix it. This mode allows you to fix in ...


46

You are ignoring the dotted line with 8va written above the upper G-clef. This means that the notes written in this clef should be played an octave above the written notes. (This notation is called All'ottava and is sometimes used to avoid ledger lines.) When you do this there is no conflict between the notes in the red box.


32

Possibly putting the cat amongst the pigeons here. An expert (at anything, be it sport, art, science, etc.) is often not a good teacher. A good teacher knows the subject, of course, but maybe hasn't the propensity to perform as well as an expert. Often, when someone is naturally good at someyhing, they will lack the empathy to understand why the students ...


24

The best-written summary I could find of this was on Wikipedia. Technical preliminaries (you can skip this if you don't care) All chordophones (musical instruments based on vibrating strings) can be analyzed using the same physics model of a string under tension that is fixed on both ends. The model is slightly simplified and differs from reality in two ...


23

Well, "Jingle Bells" ain't no Bach, but the same principles apply: if you have two voices hogging one key, you play in a manner doing justice to both. In this case, the left hand has a leading voice down, so you strike the key hard enough (and possibly with the tiniest of lead which you keep up for the rest of the left-hand phrase) to have it ...


23

Both are right, these marks are to denote the section you are playing and you don't play anything specifically for them. The proper name for these marks are rehearsal marks. In an sense you can look at them as practice checkpoints as they are typically where you would want to start playing if you needed more practice on that section instead of playing the ...


23

They are actually eighth note triplets instead of eighth notes. The alternative notation to this would be to group the eighth notes and rests in threes and put a 3 over them like a standard triplet, but it's easy enough to see that you are fitting 12 equally spaced notes in a measure which end up being eighth note triplets which would kind of screw up the ...


21

The simple answer is no. Think of it this way: Does a composer write pieces only for instruments he can play? No, he does not. He might compose pieces for instruments that he has never touched in his life. You don't have to be a virtuoso pianist to compose fast music. You have to learn how to imagine what you want to compose. If you can imagine your piece ...


20

Can't tell you what sort of pieces in what order - that's partly down to intuition on the night: reading audience reaction (or not!) and doing more of the same or not as the case may be. But, segueing is not that difficult. Sometimes a number needs to come to a proper end, but since it's background stuff, what I do is try to keep the music going, by either ...


20

There are several situations where this notation makes sense in piano music. There is one note in one part, for example the melody, but several notes in the accompaniment (written on the other staff). There is a "symmetrical" arrangement of a two hairpins showing a crescendo and a decrescendo. One of the hairpins is over a single note, the other over ...


19

This is definitely an error. I would stay away from whomever edited / published this music. Nothing is vertically aligned and the print quality is abhorrent.


19

The eighth notes in the left hand are all triplets. The ones in the right hand are normal. Note how the note heads line up vertically in measure 4. On a purely technical level, this is incorrect notation. But it's something that can be figured out pretty easily, so I guess Liszt either didn't care or wrote it like that for artistic reasons.


19

It means quite simply that the voice in question is moving between the clefs (and usually between the hands as well). In this case, the voice starting with G above middle C falls an octave to be continued in the left hand until it returns to G below middle C, then rises back up an octave to be played in the right hand. Edit: Here is the original score of ...


18

When I was taking piano lessons I learned each piece three times: Once with the right hand, once with the left hand, and the third time putting both together. After a while, the third "learning" came a lot more quickly, and after a few years I would start to slowly sight read both parts together. Today I will still practice the hard pieces one handed from ...


18

Beethoven got close in the final movement of his last piano sonata (the relevant part is from 0:30 to the end of the video)


18

Depends on what you mean by "may be able". Different instruments and music styles and instruments and practice material pose different hurdles and motivation for different people. That's not specific to playing music but any skill. The less discipline you have, the more you are dependent on upcoming hurdles and short-time rewards matching your current ...


17

The piano is very useful when teaching theory and music notation for a few different reasons. Let's look a picture of how notes and the pianos keys relate: From a notation perspective we can see that: The white keys and the naturally named notes line up perfectly so teaching them as distinct ideas won't be a problem. You get exposed to both the treble ...


17

There are no "correct" or "incorrect" fingerings for scales (or anything else). But some fingerings are obviously better than others. In particular, the 12312341... (assuming you continue for >1 octave) you learned for C, which works all the way through G, D, A, E, to B, doesn't really work well for F, because of the Bb. So generally you use 12341231... so ...


16

It is not necessary to double the root when converting guitar chords to piano chords but it could be done if fits better with the music. But there are important distinctions between the guitar and piano that come into play when considering how to notate chords on sheet music. These distinctions center around (and are affected by) the way chords are played ...


15

Practice it by playing it as slowly as needed to attain as close to 100% accuracy as possible (no perceivable mistakes). Use a metronome. Once you master it at a given slower tempo, speed it up until it becomes a challenge again and practice at the faster tempo until you master it at that tempo. Repeat this process until you can actually achieve 100% ...


15

First, I don't agree with that interpretation personally (if that's what Chopin had wanted, he would have written it that way, meticulous soul that he was), so I wouldn't put too much stock in how something "should" be played. In this etude, the voices are this flying passage and the melody in the bass. Breaking it up further is artificial-sounding. That'...


15

Those letters are just section identification. They are not meant to indicate notes to play. You might use them in a rehearsal where someone says "Ok let's all play section C now".


15

That means on the first and third repeats, play piano (quietly), on the second repeat, play forte (loudly).


14

You need to consider the total weight of the piano (say 300 pounds / 135 kg for a small upright, up to 800 pounds / 350 kg for a full size grand) compared with a typical piece of wood furniture. When a piano is moved about by "non-professionals", there is the possibility that a lot of weight gets transmitted through the hinges on the lid and the fallboard (...


14

You have stumbled across the PENTATONIC SCALE. Of which there are two - major and minor. Ascending, by starting on F#/Gb, you have the major pent., start on D#/Eb and it's the minor. The five notes (hence pent!) work well and harmoniously together, with nothing that clashes (is dissonant). These notes work well together, as the 'avoid notes' as we call them,...


14

May I suggest that it is not an 'x' per se, but actually two lines clarifying the voice leading for the top voices. Such lines are found in the first two bars as well.


13

If you are practicing, then you need to correct wrong notes. HOWEVER. This does not mean that when you play the wrong note, you simply replace it with the right one and move on. That doesn't correct the wrong note: all it does is practice in the wrong note and the correction, and that will be what happens in your performance. If you are practicing, and ...


13

There is no theory to tell you which key you're in. Different people can hear the same chord progression in different ways. Of course there are very clear cases of chord progressions, but yours is not one of them. The notes of these four chords are not from only one scale. This doesn't mean that there is no key, it just means that things could get ambiguous. ...


13

Basically, yes - callouses are your body's protection against damage (that it could incur from pressing hard on the strings, which cut into your flesh) As you become more proficient, you will learn how to press only as hard as is needed, and no more - this will help a lot, but you will still have harder pads on your fingertips. Nylon strung guitars ...



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