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43

You can divide up the octave however you want, but it turns out that doing what you suggest doesn't really make good sounding music, at least to our western ears. It all has to do with overtones and pleasant ratios of pitches. An interval sounds consonant to us when the ratio of the frequencies is mathematically simple. It causes the waveforms line up and ...


28

In a key where there are already some sharps (or flats) in the key sig., as here, every time one of those notes is played, it has to be sharp (or flat). In E, or C#m, the key here, every other note is natural - E, A, and B. So if a note sounding like a C needs to be played, it can't just be written as a C, because the player would automatically sharpen it, ...


28

Wrong reps create wrong results. DO NOT play fast and wrong. Practice as slowly as you need to to avoid wrong notes. This is very important. The reason that you need to practice in the first place is that you need to create muscle memory. If you tell your muscles to do the wrong thing they will remember to do the wrong thing. Every instance of ...


19

The reason is that dividing an octave into 12 notes sounds the best for a very mathematical reason! The frequency of each semi-tone is 21/12 away from its neighbours. Note C × ? Fraction Note C × ? Fraction C 1 1/1 C 2 2/1 C♯/D♭ 1.059 18/17 B 1.888 17/9 D 1.122 9/8 A♯/B♭ 1.782 ...


18

This is a really broad question, so I'll touch on all the parts only briefly. The assumptions I'm making are: by complete beginner, you mean a beginner at recording, not playing piano you want to make a high quality recording of an acoustic piano performance you want the recording to be digital The minimum components you need to do this well are: a ...


18

Is it too late for me to learn an instrument? No. It's never to old to learn anything. Having the determination and persistence to continue is the hard part. It might be harder for you to learn as your brain isn't as flexible as it was. Music is a language and it will take work to learn. Don't get discouraged though! Can I learn it by myself? ...


17

Is this handwritten or printed? Is the notation of German origin? In German, the notes E flat and A flat are called Es and As.


15

Closer inspection revealed the words "DAMPP CHASER". Some Googling revealed that it must be a Piano Life Saver dehumidifier, made by Dampp-Chaser.


15

There are a few different ways to approach transcription and depending on how good your ear is and how much detail you want to put into your transcription. It also should be noted that like practicing an instrument, you get better at transcribing by doing it. In general, you would need the following: A recording of the song to be transcribed Manuscript ...


15

Not particularly true! I've just sold a grand in mahogany. However, one of my theories could cover grands as well as guitars. I feel that if a solid guitar is made from a good looking, well grained piece(s) of wood, it's best just to lacquer it, so the good looks come through. If it's not that good - use a solid colour on it, and nobody will know! Grand ...


13

I've had about five different teachers over my career as an instrumentalist, and they all taught me to play slowly when I was learning a new passage. The objective has always been to play it as slowly as necessary in order to play it smoothly and without error. In doing so, it will naturally become easier to play it faster later. I believe that playing it ...


13

It sounds to me like you are using the metronome in an effective manner. Your teacher might have been concerned that you, as a young student, would have seen playing in perfect time as an artistic objective. Of course it is rarely such. The musical artist is expressing emotion and other aesthetic insights. Variety of all kinds should be deployed for that ...


12

Yes, that's a "play both notes". See http://musescore.org/node/14449 for a note on the standard from the US Music Publisher's Association.


12

My answer is ultimately similar to Bob Broadley's, but has one difference that can make for much more readable scores in slightly more complex situations. This is the standard notation for broken held chords like the one you describe, as recommended by Kurt Stone and Gardner Read: The difference here is that you don't rewrite any of the held notes until ...


12

Counting is an absolutely necessary step when learning a new piece.It is the rhythmic framework of any piece. Without it, you may well be playing a different tune. 'All the right notes, but not in the right timing'. You ask 'do they count all the time?' Well there's no need once a piece is well known to the player. We sound out words as kids, but eventually ...


12

Yes a B# is just a C, but it is written that way because that note is function like a "B" instead of a "C". If you look at the notes you have G#, B#, and F#. Look familiar? It's a G# dominant 7th (5th is omitted, but thats not unheard of). A more focused question on this idea can be seen in this question as to why notes get alternative names.


12

The note is the same key as C. It is written as B# instead of "C natural" to indicate note's "role" according to rules of classical (musical) harmony. My guess is this portion of musical piece is written in Cis-moll, and the arrpegio being played is dominant chord (G# B# D# F#). Because in minor tonalities Dominant chord always has VIIth tone (B is VIIth ...


12

I will throw in my own take as I differ from the other opinions on a few points: Like everyone says: go for it. If you put in the time and attention to it, you will get rewarded. You mention "3 hours free time on weekdays and whole day on weekends for practice". I'd suggest that you start slow: practicing is tiring. Practice a tiny bit but regularly, ...


12

Can't use feet well, but if you could move a knee to one side, it would be a simple lever attachment to the pedal, maybe from your wheelchair. Look at knee levers that pedal steel players use. You only really need the damper pedal - the 'soft' pedal could be added later, but it's not as vital as the sustain.


11

orthodox: adherence to accepted norms Is playing Bach like Glenn Gould orthodox or not? Some will swear by what he does with Bach and probably say yes, while others will cry out loud "Nooooooo"! I think answering your question about using the pedal with Bach faces the same dilemma: since Bach isn't there to tell you what he would like to have heard ...


11

I think your question is largely about the chosen notation for the Western system, which most answers haven't really addressed. The notation we have is actually pretty natural and logical, for a simple reason: there are twelve different notes in the Western system, but only a subset of these -- seven, in fact -- are used in a given scale such as the major ...


11

Contrary to that, when going to classical concerts, I've never seen grand pianos other than black. This is likely to follow the convention of 'concert black' attire. In more formal concerts, musicians will uniform to sharp monochrome colors typically white tuxes, black bowtie, with black pants or black skirts, black shoes. The piano then fits that ...


10

They say amateurs practice until they make no mistakes, while professionals practice until they're not able to make any mistakes... Mistakes include not only wrong notes but incorrect timing, dynamics, and whatever. This might be the cause for the first two characteristics you describe: they both play well but the professional is completely in control ...


10

This is called a turn. The 'basic' version would be written without the accidentals, and the player would play the first note, then quickly play one tone (note) above, the main note again, a tone below, the main note, and the resolve one the final note. The accidentals clarify exactly which notes to "twiddle" to. The turn can be either directly over a ...


10

An 88 key piano will have a TOTAL of 88 keys. White keys + black keys = 88.


10

Hard to describe exactly without a picture/photo, but you place the two fingers you find most convenient at the usual angle for a glissando, keeping them parallel and a fixed distance apart. Then you try it, and it sounds awful, but you practice. And practice. And more practice, until it begins to sound like a real glissando. Then you need more practice. ...


10

Just a few ideas: A keyboard instrument provides a lot more freedom in terms of the number of notes that can be sounded together and the distance between them. It's difficult on a guitar to play a fluidly moving bassline and a chord pattern two octaves above; it's trivial on a piano. The sustain mechanism of a piano allows for all notes to sustain at once; ...


10

It's actually Ped, and just instructs the pianist to use the sustain pedal, in this section.


10

Most of the answers here appear to be focusing on why we ended up with a seven note scale in western music. This is a great area of inquiry; however, it is worth noting that whatever the answer to this question, the seven note scale is a fundamentally arbitrary product of Western culture. Dissonance and harmony are culturally relative. The idea of the ...


9

Virtually everything about piano playing is slightly less obvious than you would at first think. You just press down the appropriate keys, right? Almost certainly you already know that there's more to it than that. At the most basic level, which fingers to set where is a question that opens a whole world of possibilities. A good teacher knows this world ...



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