Tag Info

New answers tagged

-1

Forget it! If you are playing a large organ with 3 to 4 keyboards and upwards of 30 or 40 stops or more you may be eaten alive or worse - disappear for good. To play an organ well needs a lot of time and effort, without that you don't stand a chance against the beast. It won't sound right without using the pedal board and a least 2 manuals for the wedding ...


0

Well, one thing to note is that you are planning to use this live and presumably in settings with an audience of less than 1000. Most answers here focus on getting the best kind of Hammond sound (or actually any) for recordings or a P.A. The least-effort answer for that is to get a keyboard/expander with a good Hammond sound. But there is another ...


2

You're right that this is a very common chord shape, and it would be good to get it under control. Is the problem your hand size? Can you reach an octave without too much effort? The best simplification would be to drop the low B (and finger the remaining notes 1-3-5). B is the third of the chord, which least needs to be doubled, especially in a lower ...


0

The issue is entirely the diminished chord (or half diminished seventh chord). Unlike the rest of the chords, the root leaps a tritone instead of a perfect fifth. This makes it the weak link in the chain. In a minor key, it is the 2 chord, which comes fairly late in the progression, after the direction that the progression is going has been well ...


0

The problem you mention is a one I face constantly with my students. I teach piano, so most probably I will be able to help you. Until I see your fingering and how much coordination their is, I can't give you a concrete solution, because those are based on individual fingering and hand- brain coordination. I would suggest you try learning Beethoven's ...


1

You have to understand why playing dynamics make you fail both hands. My guess is that it makes you anticipate the next notes and because you are probably too shaky in both hands, you fail in putting them together. Try combinations of the following: continue practicing hands separately with dynamics play slowly both hands without dynamics, and with ...


1

Before you do ANY dynamics, you must be able to play the piece with both hands almost flawlessly. Dynamics are there to be added after the technique has gotten perfected. Play like a robot a few times, then once you've mastered that, you must accent the left hand melody more than the right. Again, no dynamics other than that. Once you've gotten that down, ...


1

Play the two hands separately slowly, noticing whether you're playing the melody or the accompaniment.


1

Slow down until you can play it (even if it means playing extremely slowly). Then gradually increase your speed.


3

Most pieces have the melody played by R.H. and accompaniment by L.H. So we piano players get used to this concept. This is the other way round, and the L.H. is playing the tune. Our left hand is not au fait with this, so it's tricky. You could try, for a bit of fun, swapping hands (and either octaves, or crossing) so it's more of a 'normal' situation. ...


4

A curved line connected two notes that are the same pitch is a tie. If they are different pitches, it is a slur. In this example, the C sharps in the bottom voices in the right hand are tied, and the other voices are played legato according to the slurs.


4

Finger pedalling, or finger sustain. I've also heard it referred to as "sticky fingers". If you switch fingers it would be part of finger substitution.


0

Why dont you try some of the following websites: http://www.teachpianotoday.com/ They have a variety of game ideas, and even have a special piano games club! my kids absolutely love playing the games that I have received through this club. http://www.susanparadis.com/ She has wonderful resources for games listed and most of them are free. ...


1

Edouard provided a perfect explanation. I don't have to add anything to that. Just a couple of comments: I would be very surprised if your digital piano was tuned with sharp low notes and flat high notes. Perhaps the samples Roland uses for the high notes have particularly strong (flat) harmonics and you are sensitive to them? It would be interesting if ...


1

Stick your A4 sheet music onto card. Then using gaffer tape or something else stick the cards together. This way you can have 2 3 or 4 sheets that will fold to A4 and still be solid enough to stand on music stand or piano etc.


-4

I see numbers 1,2,4 there. Maybe this is written for four singers, where 1 and 2 sing and 4 sings I don't know what happend to singer 3. Maybe she is silent here. Or maybe her part is on the other staff that we don't see in the OP.


9

Dave is right, but there's a little more to it. You can break the part up into two different lines. One that looks like this: And another that looks like this: When you put them together, you get the two part represented by different stems. It's pretty much telling you to hold the first note for the length of a quarter note, but play the set of notes ...


5

There are two voices in this music: the lower plays f, then e as quarter notes; Note that the downward pointing stem's don't have flags/beams -- thus they are quarter notes. the upper plays f <a d> e <g c#> as eighth notes This is the way to write music where more than one voice happen to execute the same note at the same time. If you ...


3

The symbol over the note (which can also be below a note, upside down) is called a fermata and nowadays it has become a standard indication of a pause*. Meaning that the duration of the note or a rest associated with the fermata will be longer than it's supposed to be. say for example, if it's above a quarter note then the duration of the quarter note could ...


0

Fermata it mans pause. That last note should be slightly held.


2

That's a fermata, indicating to rest on this note longer than its nominal value.


0

I realize in these economic times a teacher is sometimes prohibitive. However, utubes can only go so far, for both instruments. If faced with a choice, piano, only because the chance of causing irreversible damage to muscles, ligaments and tendons is less. Basically, playing a keyboard, the stressors are less, as both hands are doing basically the same ...


0

I would try aural target practice. If you have two pianos, play a note on one when the student isn't looking, and see how many tries they need to find the matching note. If you have one piano, you can let them play an octave above or below. This works but the previous (two pianos) is preferable because it encourages their independence and avoids the ...


2

I'd recommend the piano because you'll inherently learn more about music theory and how notes work together, and that will benefit you in many ways. Keyboards provide a very clear, visual analogy of the notes they create and this facilitates understanding the more abstract ideas in music (it can distract from it, too, but it helps more than it harms). ...


-1

Violin involves both hands working together to produce notes. With piano you might have left hand playing bass clef, right hand playing treble clef, never mind your feet. Because of this I would consider violin easier, even if some the most basic things (playing a series of single notes) are harder. Is guitar out of the question? It's probably easier than ...


0

Strongly recommend guitar. Much cheaper than either of the other two. Violin has an initial learning curve of pure glass to get to making nice noises. It is virtually impossible to learn the technique you need without a teacher. It also requires you to have the hearing to tell whether you're exactly on the note or slightly off, and adjust for it. Not ...


0

Piano may be less frustrating to begin with, easier to learn technique-wise. But this is also an instrument that leads many self-taught (or bad-taught) musicians to rely on keys and "finger memory" instead of their ears. Hearing is what makes you a good musician. Violin forces you to train this fundamental aspect from the outset. It's also cheap and easy to ...


3

Learning to play the violin by yourself is very hard. If a teacher is out of the question, then I strongly recommend going for the piano (there a lot of youtube tutorials for piano self-learners, I've yet to see one for a violin).


0

there are several ways of using the metronome,u can try this out.practice your scalem,lick,transcribe solos,exercise etc on the beat per measure that is,whole,half,8th,16th etc.for instance when you have your metronome set to 70BPM,You can apply any of the above mention beats to it,this is a gud way of using your metronome to practice,it enables you play the ...


0

Unless you have a physical handicap, you're not too old to learn. And with that I mean something like severe arthritis or having one or both hands amputated. Being completely deaf would also be a problem of course You can, but as others have said it's far from ideal. At the very least go for some video instruction course, ideally with an internet forum or ...


1

I played violin (and later viola) since childhood up through college. I never learned piano. You say you don't want to engage a teacher. That's fine, it won't stop you from being able to play. But if you want to become really good that will hurt you because you'll learn habits that will prevent your technique from becoming really good later and those habits ...


12

I will throw in my own take as I differ from the other opinions on a few points: Like everyone says: go for it. If you put in the time and attention to it, you will get rewarded. You mention "3 hours free time on weekdays and whole day on weekends for practice". I'd suggest that you start slow: practicing is tiring. Practice a tiny bit but regularly, ...


18

Is it too late for me to learn an instrument? No. It's never to old to learn anything. Having the determination and persistence to continue is the hard part. It might be harder for you to learn as your brain isn't as flexible as it was. Music is a language and it will take work to learn. Don't get discouraged though! Can I learn it by myself? ...


4

For question 1: It's never too late to learn anything. Age is never a barrier to learn anything. You are still 26 years old. How come you came to such a conclusion? And about your muscles and bones concerns, all I've got to say is you are not going to work out in a gym, weight lifting or body building. You are going to learn the best philosophy that can ...


3

Probably 95% of students who take lessons don't end up performing professionally. Music will be something they do for themselves and their friends, and good accompanists are rare in many areas. If she wants to be able to sing with an accompanist with any frequency, her options are to marry one (my wife's choice) or be able to accompany herself. Of course ...


1

I used to think that a baby grand piano was superior to an upright piano but this is definitely not the case. The reason most people think this is the poor quality of most upright pianos. A 1930s Blüthner upright piano sounds nearly as good as a Blüthner 7ft grand piano, with a fantasatically sonorant bass. A Blüthner baby grand of the same ...


0

Adding to Dom's comprehensive answer, there's also Amaj., Dmaj, and Emaj., all found as dominants to the minor keys of D, G and A respectively, mentioned above. There are also chords which fit songs from the parallel keys. D minor's being D major. Thus D, Em, F#m, G, A, Bm and Co. So, for each list, change the parent key maj. to min., and vice versa. This ...


1

i'm not a good pianist.. i've only spent my entire childhood learning the way of classical pieces... though i started to play pop musics on my church (basically pop christian songs), and indeed they are similar but different kind of music... it took 2-3 years for me to start getting about the pop music (again.. i'm not a good pianist)... as stated by ...


5

The key you are in defines the harmony, what chords you naturally have access to, and what the tonic is. From a single chord alone you cannot determine for sure either the key or the tonic, especially for a minor chord which doesn't have as strong a pull towards other chords as, say, a dominant chord. There are a few possibilities depending which key you ...


1

I'd just play the A2 and G3 notes with the left and the C4 and E4 with the right hand here. It's already where you need it and mostly idle. You just have to make sure to match the articulation and volume of the left hand. While you could also play everything but the bass note with the right hand regarding reach, that would require the right hand to split ...


1

The problem with using your left hand will be that the first note of the bar won't be sustained. If your piano has a sostenuto (middle) pedal, one way you could avoid this is to catch the first note of the bar in the sostenuto pedal and then play the rest of the bass clef notes in the left hand.


0

Stretching could be very effective, because the tissues between the fingers are stretchable. There is a good device to carry out that. www.increasehandspan.com/test



Top 50 recent answers are included