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-1

If you're a DIY type, look for ways of reinforcing the stand. Or get a better stand. I don't think there's much more to say on this subject?


0

The software-based course "Sight Reading Method" does rhythmic and melody reading separately at first, and combines them later. It also allows you to customize rhythmic training exercises by choosing the rhythmic elements you want to practice with. There is a Windows and Mac version available for download at micrologus.com and some more description at ...


1

Recently released, "Sight Reading Method" software course included in the Musician Training Center program: http://www.micrologus.com/courses/sight_reading_method (Windows and Mac version available at http://www.micrologus.com/download )


2

Finger substitution is not the way to go, unless you are playing an organ and not the piano. Absolute legato on the piano isn't as important as playing the notes with even tempo and dynamics. If you have small hands you can play the whole passage fingered 5 4 1 2 1 4 1 4 5 4 1 2 1 4 1 4 etc. Learn to "jump" unobtrusively between 5 and 4. You can cover the ...


3

Sliding as Tim suggests is definitely a possibility, but my teachers always discouraged it. As you noted in the comments it can be difficult to move while pedalling, and it is generally a somewhat awkward and inaccurate movement regardless (especially if the bench is leather or something and you must lift off it to slide down). I think a combination of ...


1

The simplest is to slide along the seat so that there isn't a great reach any more. With scales, unless they're contrary, make sure your body is central to the central part of whichever scale you play. You may need to start an octave lower, or higher, to compensate. Most people will be able to play to 5 octaves apart, but not very often will the need to ...


2

That is bach's cello prelude from suite no1? I used to play that on the piano, and I always stretched. As you get more advanced, you will be playing pieces that require this kind of stretching, and you will learn how to quickly adjust your hand in order to allow your fingers to go where they need to go. I am not sure what finger substitution is in this ...


1

By the way, if the question is really the classic "what should I buy the beginning player in my house": If they're taking traditional piano lessons with the goal of learning to play the classical piano repertoire really well, and if they've been at it more than a few years, then they need a piano in good working order. If they're learning more as a way to ...


2

Good answer, but I need to strongly emphasize the following after playing on a digital piano (basically a weighted and better keyboard) for 10 years: The pedal, the pedal, the pedal, is 100% completely different. It doesn't matter the first few years of playing, because you are busy getting other more "important" (or rather, more immediate) techniques down ...


0

Additional considerations: Portability Obviously, pianos are hard to move and often require specialized piano movers. "Digital pianos" with everything built in are meant to be furniture. They're easier to move, but you still won't be taking them to your local jam session on weekends. Instruments meant to be used with separate stand, amp, and speakers ...


0

A few tips: Practice sight-reading left-hand parts with the right hand (resting the left) Practice sight-reading right-hand parts with the left (resting the right) It's generally more difficult for the left hand to do the right hand's job than the other way around, so practice accordingly. Learn about stride piano and related genres. If you like what you ...


0

It really depends on your specific personal goals. It's only a bad habit if you have a compelling need to be able to sight read and play a piece note by note. If you were going to be in a position where you would be expected to instantly play any piece that was put in front of you without rehearsal, then you would want to overcome that tendency and learn ...


1

Just a different sort of flashcard. Get some blank postcards and a black marker pen and in your best musical handwriting, notate a rhythmic pattern lasting one crotchet on each card. Each single card could contain for instance (a non-exhaustive list): crotchet quaver quaver crotchet rest dotted quaver semiquaver semiquaver semiquaver quaver rest Triplet ...


1

Had you thought of buying studio time rather than studio equipment? Even if you were paying $50/h your $1500 would still buy you extended use of a decent well-maintained grand piano in a nice acoustic space, boutique microphones and, probably most important, someone expert who knows how to get the sounds you're after.


0

In "locked hands" style, you can often take a pragmatic voice-leading approach to passing chords. Move what has to move, let what can stay put do so. No need to worry too much about analyzing the result.


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It sounds to me like you are referring to the passing 6/4 chord progression of I(6)-vii(6)-I. Which is very common passing chord. (especially in four part harmony exercises.)


0

OK. In fact this questions is not one but many, depending on the (theory knlowledge) level of the person asking. To understand how to use a passing chord, one must first understand what is NOT a passing chord. In jazz, a passing chord is something different from the iim7-V7-IM7 (in major), or the minor equivalent of iim7b5 -V7alt-ImM7 (Im6) AND THAT IS ...


5

If you take a look at music like the two-part inventions and three-part symphonies by Bach, they make a lot of musical sense, and while they are intended as practice pieces, the prevalent problem (and increase of diffuculty when going from inventions to symphonies) is not one of hitting particular combinations of notes at the same time but rather of ...


3

Yes. That book, while being very good, is not paced well for beginners. It throws a ton of hard-to-learn stuff at you right away. I'd recommend supplementing it with other books that perhaps have more written out examples to work with as well. I wouldn't say it's good as an only book. The thing about learning is jazz is that I could sit down with a new ...


0

Gould is both the most appreciated and most criticised performer of Baroque music! And he's translating the music to piano, which has a quire different set of expressive possibilities to the instruments the composers knew. Enjoy!


1

The first one's OK, you've redistributed the original notes. But in the second one you've invented a new harmony, and that ISN'T OK! I suggest you simply leave out the low E in the RH. Or even play the B octave a bit early, catch it with the pedal and take the E with your LH.


0

Imagine a single sharp written before the F#: it wouldn't have any effect (unless it cancels a natural sign in the same bar). So the double sharp raises the F# by a semi-tone, which is enharmonically equivalent to a G.


0

Accidentals are always just what they say, and not affected in any way by the key signature. (Other than the key signature being the reason to put them there!) So yes, in this case, it is an F double sharp - or G natural.


2

Some objective differences to listen for: Dynamic range. On an "entry level" instrument, if you play with enough force you get more mechanical noises, not louder notes. In a really poor instrument you might even break something. The quality of the action also limits how softly you can play without randomly not playing notes at all. In the 6-figure price ...


3

Before getting into sound quality, one thing that can set pianos apart is their action. Last time I knew a lot about what was going on with pianos, only pianos with horizontal strings (grand style) could have a full proper double escapement action. That affects how quickly you can play the same note again after you've played it at least once, and/or how far ...


1

In conjunction with the slur and the rit., it means bring out the right hand figure slightly. The slur already specifies that the figure is to be played legato and as a group (which means that the last crochet should probably be slightly detached from whatever follows it, although it will be held reasonably long anyway due to the rit.). From an interpretive ...


2

Rit is probably ritenuto, an immediate slowing down, as opposed to rubato, and tenuto means hang on for full note value - or even a touch longer: which makes sense as one will make the other happen.So, the whole bar should come at a slightly slower pace than the preceding bars. On the assumption it's written in C at that point - I'm guessing - you can play ...


1

Mix it up to make it interesting. Sometimes, play something melodic in the right hand, with chords in the left hand. Sometimes, play something rhythmically interesting in the left hand (fairly low down) while you play chords in the right hand. And so on. Experiment with different amounts of contrast between left and right hands, see what you feel goes ...


7

There are two unrelated things going on here, and I'm not sure which you're asking about. The small bit of staff with the tiny notes on it is called an ossia. It goes with the staff below it, and gives you an alternative way to play that passage. In this case, the difference looks to be the location of the accented notes (marked with the > symbol), although ...


0

As the poster above me mentioned, Rimsky-Korsakov's book is a great resource, along with Kent Kennan's Technique of Orchestration, and Samuel Adler. There's many orchestration books out there, and be sure to do some research on voice leading and counterpoint. Watch some videos showcasing each instruments' ranges, timbres, and qualities. Also, get yourself ...


9

Well, the thing to remember is that the harpsichord and organ have no touch sensitivity like piano, and the piano wasn't invented yet. So any kind of keyboard music was written to be played all at the same volume, and composers made the sound fuller or emptier by managing the voicing. If you play a Bach fugue on a piano, you can add dynamics but it won't ...


3

You don't need to play an instrument in order to write for it. After all, the vast majority of people don't play every orchestral instrument (at least not well; music ed majors typically have to learn a bit of everything but they're not expected to achieve anything close to mastery). It's just important that you know how every instrument works so that you ...


3

I do it like But, really, a pc keyboard has no key velocity and is often limited to 3 keys down max before it starts ignoring keys... bleh :(


0

Notwithstanding the fact that a keyboard player would hate it no matter what, from a logical standpoint neither can make sense, and for a reason: it would depend whether, in context, the black keys would be sharps or flats. I suppose you'll have to go with @JCPedroza's suggestion.


0

Both are unintuitive and ambiguous, but if I had to choose, I would go with the second for two reasons: Fingering with the right hand works a little bit better for chromatic scales, as well as flat keys (but the opposite is true for sharp keys and the left hand -- I'm considering that the right hand will be used more often). It visually looks more like a ...


4

Both are very unintuitive and kind of confusing. Why can't you put them in the middle, like in the Roland TB 3? They occupy the same space as in your setup, but the positioning makes more sense and is more intuitive.


2

Start simple. Take a familiar tune like "Happy Birthday" and pick a starting note. Lets just pick "G" (this means you will be playing the tune in the key of C Major). Keep trying to play the song, re-starting from the beginning every time until you can get through the entire thing. At first, this will be difficult. You'll play the first 8 notes, and ...


2

I suggest starting with lead sheets, with melody and chords only. The term "playing by ear" was always a pejorative when I was young. It meant some kind of illiterate flailing at the instrument, maybe learning rote patterns with no idea of how they worked together musically. (Think of little kids playing "Heart and Soul" with four hands - great fun.) But ...


1

Get a book of songs in whatever style/genre you like, transposed for bass/baritone. Best is if the book contains some songs you know well and some you don't. Every day choose a song and spend some time sight-singing. Sight-singing creates strong connections in your brain; I really think it's the best method.


1

It helped me to write notes on an empty stave. Perhaps you could start with scales in different keys up to let's say three sharps, three flats. When you feel comfortable, try to write chord progression, e.g. tonic, subdominant, and dominant (I, IV, V) in those keys and then try different variations. Another popular chord progression is II, V and I. This will ...


2

Here are some suggestions, have a try and let us know how it goes: Get a feel for the tune CD player / Media player, play a tune that is not too complicated you have never learnt Listen to the whole tune a few times until you can hear in your head what the next melody will be before it plays Learn in parts - Play a few seconds at a time (a phrase) and ...


1

In A minor, the V harmony, from the E dominant 7th notes, is E-G#-B-D.I see the chord as a V7 with no root. Often the root can be found elsewhere in the bar. So I'd call it an inversion of V7 .


3

The vii dim is a somewhat-frequently-used chord in the Baroque, especially in first inversion, as here (G#dim/B). This chord is typically used as a substitute for the dominant seventh (e.g. E7 in this case), as it shares the V7's leading tone (the G♯) and it's melodic tendency to resolve upwards towards tonic (A). Indeed, a vii dim chord is essentially ...


0

On a grand piano, you can play ff with the soft pedal down if you want. You get a different tone color by moving the hammers sideways so a different part of the hammer strikes the string, but the volume of sound doesn't change much if your fingers use the same amount of force with una corda and tre corde. But that doesn't work on an upright piano, where the ...


2

Practice sight-reading a single line on the bass clef on its own. You can find plenty of music for cello, bassoon, songs for bass voice, etc, to download from http://imslp.org/. I started as a keyboard player, and The way I taught myself to read "less common" clefs, like C clefs on any line of the stave in old vocal scores was to focus on just a few ...


2

When I was in college, I helped a few people with learning to read new clefs. One tuba especially really needed help with treble clef. Know that whatever method works for you to learn it, eventually you become fluent and the method disappears, much like it did with treble clef. As you guessed, what you need is exposure to more bass clef and you'll be able ...


4

Shift your perception down by one whole line/space. C below the treble clef is one line below the clef; C below the bass clef is two. High F is the top line of the treble clef; the top F of the bass clef is the second-from-top line. C on the treble clef is the space above the middle line; C on the bass clef is the space below the middle line... and so forth. ...


2

I'm a guitar player, so naturally I learned the treble clef first, and only much later did I need to learn the bass clef. I remember what helped me a lot then. It is maybe trivial and all too obvious, but as a pure visual help I imagined that the notes stay where they are (with respect to the treble clef) and that the lines shift up by one. I.e., I tried to ...


3

I've played both piano and bass guitar, and what helps me is a bit of transposition. Find a tune that you can play on your right hand, in treble clef, well. Make sure it's something you could stand to listen to like 100 more times. Using a blank staff (lines on a piece of notebook paper work fine), transpose that line into bass clef. A G in treble clef ...


3

There simply is no easy way about it. You begin at your entry points (as I like to call them) F being on the second line from top and G being on the bottom line on the staff. You may also find it useful to write the letters A-B-C-D-E-F-G out on your answer book. You have notes on lines and in spaces and when you go down on the staff you count backwards and ...



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