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0

If you want to learn properly, don't use "shortcut" youtube tutorials. Find yourself a teacher. There are usually listings on websites. Try and find a teacher with tertiary music education. Good luck!


0

I'd just play the A2 and G3 notes with the left and the C4 and E4 with the right hand here. It's already where you need it and mostly idle. You just have to make sure to match the articulation and volume of the left hand. While you could also play everything but the bass note with the right hand regarding reach, that would require the right hand to split ...


1

The problem with using your left hand will be that the first note of the bar won't be sustained. If your piano has a sostenuto (middle) pedal, one way you could avoid this is to catch the first note of the bar in the sostenuto pedal and then play the rest of the bass clef notes in the left hand.


0

Stretching could be very effective, because the tissues between the fingers are stretchable. There is a good device to carry out that. www.increasehandspan.com/test


4

It's 4 octaves + C: CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB C. You count 4 octaves from the starting note and add the starting note again: C1-C2 (first octave), C2-C3 (second), C3-C4(third), C4-C5(fourth), C5-C6(fifth), as above. The first example you provided: CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB is 5 octaves minus a minor second. The second example: ...


0

Studying theory and learning your scales will help a lot but you also need to practice playing by ear. Start by just trying to pick out the melodies of some of your favorite songs. At first you will struggle but, like anything else, with practice it will get easier. As you get better at this try putting a music channel on the radio and just sit at the ...


-1

This question is probably no longer active, but should anyone look, here are some of the more detailed points that I have found. Hertz It is suggested that the human ear can have a sensitivity of up to 1 Hz. Good sounding chords are ones that have wavelengths that match sufficiently enough so that the ear cannot tell the difference. If you wanted to ...


2

I never took classical piano lessons, but it does help to a degree. It helps with sight reading, should you ever decide to sit in a session and everyone are reading charts arranged for originals, etc. It helps with basic chords. Mostly Major and minor triads in different inversions, with different bass notes from the same chord. (typical feature in classical ...


7

That is a trill, not a mordent. It actually starts on the upper auxiliary. The table below is from the Clavier-Büchlein vor Wilhelm Friedemann Bach, i.e., it is Bach's own. You can read more about it here. This a duplicate of this question.


1

Any single string creates harmonics as it rings. Up to eight parts a C would generate C C G CEG Bb and C, essentially a dominant 7th chord. The lower partials are louder and than the upper partials due to string length influencing volume. A longer portion of the string vibrating will be louder. Tempered tuning requires that octaves and fifths sound good ...


0

Aurialia has good training exercises that would display the exactly wanted content (notation sheet with labels where the hits were expected, and red labels showing actual hit timing as done by student), and would achieve the assumed goal (rhythm training with computer tools). However Auralia cannot analyze arbitrary piano music; you need to use the built-in ...


0

My Evolution e-Keys mini USB piano keyboard has 17 mm wide naturals with 1 mm gaps between them so the center-to-center measurement is 18 mm, 5 mm less than what is normal on a piano. The distance from the front edge of the naturals to the accidentals are 30 mm while on a piano this is 50 mm and on organs often 46 mm.


2

I don't think so for two reasons: Converting even perfectly timed MIDI backwards to a score is in several respects unsatisfying, as can be found in many other answers on this forum. The errors a beginner will typically make (holding this eighth a bit too long, that quarter too short, emphasis on wrong notes, inconsistent tempo) are very difficult to ...


4

Yes, indeed. Computer programs for doing this have been around for more than 30 years. But to help your son with his timing, you don't want to record and display audio waveforms, and you don't want to have a computer program transcribe his recorded playing into standard music notation (there are certainly programs that can do this, but this will be of ...


1

Smart Music does something like this. It has exercises and songs to play through the program that shows a note green if you played the correct note and at the correct time, and red if you played the wrong note in the wrong place, the right note at the wrong time, etc. It also has a huge repertoire of music. It works for many instruments, too. ...


3

I have no idea what Bartok was thinking when he wrote this, but one way to create something similar would be: 1. Start with a "big idea". In this case, "hey, what happens if the left hand plays the white keys and the right hand the black keys". (OK, that's not quite accurate because the right hand plays the white key B, but you get the idea). 2. Figure out ...


5

Look what the score is doing: you have an oscillation rising from F♯ in the initial RH part, moving up to C♯, but artfully dodging A♯. At the same time, you have an accompaniment that consists largely of the fifth D-A alternating with the auxiliary notes E-G. The entire section is acting like an elaboration of a D major chord in a kind of quasi-Lydian ...


0

Basically it's how to pedal with pianos. Jazz tends to change chords more often than other genres of music. So in order to stop the music sounding muddy, pedaling properly is paramount. As the underlying chord is changed, the pedal needs to be lifted and after the next chord is played, the pedal is employed again.


4

Use the sustain pedal and get the right hand out of the way. Alternately, you could make the executive decision to drop the B and E in the right hand; given that those pitches are already present in the left hand and will be coming in immediately on the next eighth note, this would be an almost unnoticeable change.


2

A very common issue; this occurs a lot in the works of Mendelssohn as well. Some professional pianists seem to ignore the composers' pedal marks in passages like these, and some observe them. It seems like in these cases the composer was thinking of an orchestral analogue, so in the RH of that piece it looks like the phrase marking he would have written for ...


2

Usually this technique allows you to add musical interest by filling out the left hand with more harmonies or a counter melody. You'll want to keep the melody in its own musical space - so either play it with the top of the right hand or the bottom of the left hand. To keep the melody on top, build the chords with the melody notes at the top of the chord, ...


0

It is pretty common to change clefs in the middle of a piece. There are 4 fairly common clefs (treble, alto, tenor, bass), and which one a piece is written in really depends on where the notes are on the clef. Each clef puts middle C in a different place on the staff. If the left hand is centered above middle C, it makes more sense to use a treble clef than ...


2

Yes, you play with both hands above the middle C. This is quite common for instruments that are written in both clefs, not only in piano. This will help you, because if the bass clef goes really high, it is really hard to read all those extra lines. So, since you are basically in the treble clef, the music usually shifts clefs.


0

It also may depend on how fast or slow the notes are as was mentioned. Is there a pedal involved? I would try to keep my hand as close to perpendicular to the keyboard as possible. I tend to think that your first choice is the closest except for the 2nd to the last B where I would use my 2nd finger. Thats for the first example. In the 2nd I would use what ...


1

A lot of it depends on tempo, as well as the size of your hand. In general, it's better to avoid passing the thumb under or finger over in widely-spaced figures such as this one, unless the tempo is very slow and you want a very legato sound and can't get it any other way because your hand is too small. Also, thumb on black keys is much less of a ...


4

I'm not sure in this context if that is playing the piece 'wrong' or within the bounds of personal playing style? The short answer is "depends on who you ask," as is so often the case. Compare the beginning of these two performances of Chopin's Ballade No. 3. The first is Rubinstein, and the second is Paderewski, both Polish pianists (Rubinstein used ...


1

The usual technique for those tremolo octaves is to rotate the arm rapidly back and forth from the elbow. (Glenn Gould executed very rapid tremolos with fingers only; if you are a similar freak of nature then you may ignore this post entirely.) Back when I was learning it, I found it helpful to practice the technique away from the piano, by holding your ...


-1

Stienway started or promoted the tradition that became habit and tradition. white and natural wood are no uncommon. Gershwin popularized it. and it hids dirt better.


1

If you're talking about keyboard playing, beware of playing close position chords in the LH. That register can get muddy, and it's where bass lines (or maybe counter-melodies), not chords, belong. If you want a C chord, play the notes of a C chord. Colouring it by adding the 6th (A) or major 7th (B) is harmonically neutral. The minor 7th (Bb) turns it ...


-1

the piano is the result of instrument evolution since the first string went twang. the harp ...to the harp-si-cord ... a mechanical way of playing the harp from a 'key' or note board. the harpsichord was very popular. save for one problem: it only had one volume. then the hammer was fashioned and integrated ... merging to great areas of music the string ...


4

You're unlikely to see a classical piano concert with a piano that is anything but black. One of the reasons is that 95% of all concert pianists are Steinway Artists. Another reason is that black Steinways are the least expensive. A Steinway artist has to have a performing career, agrees to feature the words "Steinway Piano" on his programs, and agrees to ...


2

Taking your theory further, you could , while on that E melody note, play a G# as well. Now it stops sounding so good! The E melody note is contained, as Dom says, within the C maj chord. Playing an Emaj. chord wouldn't (usually) work as the G# is not in the Cmaj. set of notes - it's not diatonic. The B sometimes works, as it makes a Cmaj.7 chord, and of ...


1

The notes of a C major chord are C, E, and G. To fill out the chord if the melody has a E you could play the missing notes C and G. It's the simplest and most effect way of filling in the rest of the chord. There are other options though that I will explain. If you are playing with others you have a lot more freedom in your voicing and as long as you are ...


3

Most of the other answers address the instruments' ranges. While it is true that the piano has an exceptional range, that by itself is only a very small part of a piano's value. Most music, especially pop and folk music, doesn't use the piano's full range. Neither does beginner music, or most intermediate music. Instead, the piano's biggest value is that ...


11

Contrary to that, when going to classical concerts, I've never seen grand pianos other than black. This is likely to follow the convention of 'concert black' attire. In more formal concerts, musicians will uniform to sharp monochrome colors typically white tuxes, black bowtie, with black pants or black skirts, black shoes. The piano then fits that ...


9

Though some cite aesthetic reasons for a piano's color, it actually has nothing to do with appearance, but rather economy. Before Bartolomeo Cristofori invented the first piano at the turn of the 18th century, there existed several predecessors; chief among them, the clavichord, which I will discuss in greater detail in a moment. Up until the development ...


15

Not particularly true! I've just sold a grand in mahogany. However, one of my theories could cover grands as well as guitars. I feel that if a solid guitar is made from a good looking, well grained piece(s) of wood, it's best just to lacquer it, so the good looks come through. If it's not that good - use a solid colour on it, and nobody will know! Grand ...


1

The version I listened to is in B, using B, E and F#. The sus2 on the F# is under, not on top as in that tab version. So it's not going to sound the same. Tab is notorious for being inaccurate (at least in my opinion!), so this version is likely a simplified one. It will sort of work on guitar with a capo (on fret 4), but still won't be a faithful copy of ...


2

Adding my answer from software recommendations to this thread: Check out 'Pitch' on the apple app store: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/id989140910?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo=6 It shows random notes and listens for the note you play. You get a point for each right note. Here is the website: http://www.practicemakesperfect.education You can change clef and key ...


2

I think it's not really about ranges, it's really about convenience. I'm going to ignore the possibilities of left-handed dominance in this response also :P When playing on "elementary piano" alone, one wants to accompany themselves while also playing the melody. That requires two hands, and it is traditional and natural for the higher part to play the ...


-2

I think 'arbitrary' is the right answer. I suspect that pleasing tones and intervals existed long before scales, keys, and other theories existed. And there's something fundamental in the human organism that allows us to enjoy music. Look at how many great (not just good) musicians don't read music. Then some ridiculously complex theory was created to ...


3

When there's no vocals, the r.h. needs to play the melody. It may well put chords in under this, but the l.h. takes on the job of bass line and chords, often. As soon as a vocal line is sung, there's no need for the r.h. to play the melody, as that's taken care of - unless it's doubled up, or harmonised. So the r.h. can take over chords, and other ...


3

Before I talk about cool-down exercises-- I'd be wary in your situation as you describe your feelings as "sore" and "uncomfortable". After a good practice session, you may feel a general sense of tiredness, but you should NEVER have pain or even soreness. Robert Schumann invented a device to "stretch" his fingers and ended up with an irreversible hand injury ...


0

A quick search on the internet gave me this: http://www.pianocareer.com/piano-health/piano-wrist-arm-shoulder-warm-up/ Although they are warm up exercises, they might help prevent this sort of thing. Also, splitting up your practice sessions into 10-15 min sections with 5 min "breaks" (where you get up or play something less strenuous) may help.


0

"All I want is to make song more dynamic, dramatic, more colorful." That is very vague and I have trouble understanding what you are asking. If you are trying to make music, everyone wants to make it more colorful, dramatic, and dynamic. So please forgive me if I answer the wrong question. Pop music uses the same few chords, often, and the use of them is ...


0

My saxophone teacher gave me an exercise for practicing the arpeggios of various chords in a given key that contain the root note. The form might be difficult to play on guitar, but I think it could be a useful exercise on piano. The different chords are mostly formed by changing one chord tone by a half step each time. Each arpeggio returns to the root of ...


0

To help with your hand independence, try a few of A Dozen A Day's books and Czerny (sheet music available on IMSLP). For diving in music and not just "exercises", Faber and Faber are always solid. I would highly suggest a few lessons with an experienced instructor, though, who can work with you to identify books and pieces that you could learn either with ...


0

Another 2 cents to add to this-- Practice sightreading regularly. Easy stuff first-- but pick a diversity of genres, don't just stick to sonatinas or pop songs, etc. Get into the habit of taking a few minutes BEFORE playing to check out the obvious things-- like key signature, time signature, any changes in the middle, basic piece structure and perhaps ...


0

Two things: (1) your fingers stay very close to the keyboard (2) you slow your attack (the time it takes for you to press a key and reach the bottom). They should both contribute to a quieter sound. Practicing these two things slowly will eventually help it become automatic once you play faster.


1

I have been playing the piano for 45 years. I have the ability to play well by ear anything I hear but also I was trained from age 4 on classical music. The reason I believe I sight read about any piece of music is years of practicing. Eventually it becomes habit. My eye hand coordination has become second nature. Do something long enough you will figure it ...



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