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1

I want to shares on how my way to records some stuff of music recording with videos : so you will need these prerequisites : 1. keyboard 2. soundcard (e.g behringer UCA222) 3. jack cable 4. DAW (e.g nuendo) 5. Video Editor (e.g adobe premiere) tips : connect your keyboard to soundcard via jack cable, and plug that soundcard to your PC-DAW ...


1

I suggest you just try with a digital piano (yamaha p-35 in example) that has a midi-port. So for the starter, you not only gets the natural sound of piano and great tuts(like wood piano) exacly, and also the capabilities of a midi-controller keyboard just by plug your digital piano with a usb-midi-cable into your computer-music.


1

You can't do that if you are work on live recording, such records your live play using "piano/keyboard" into a Digital Audio Workstation(e.g. Nuendo) which it saves the wave sounds into it. The possible way to do its try to records your music using a "midi-controller" keyboard like behringer umx, or plug your keyboards with a usb midi cable and connect it ...


0

To build familiarity with this action, you may first practice a piece you already know, or just scales-- one time, focus on making one hand louder than the other, and the next time, focus on the other hand. Play as slow as you need to, to get the "feeling" correct, or at least, not as alien or hard. After that warm-up, practice the passage in which you need ...


4

Blues is a language, with grammar and vocabulary. The difference between learning to play the blues and learning to play a blues is the same as the difference between learning to speak a language and learning just some words or phrases in that language. In the vocabulary instead of words you are using scales and chords. In the grammar instead of order of ...


0

ABRSM also has its own forums where you can get additional information. LINK


1

The diploma syllabus gives a full list of requirements and the equivalent qualifications from other boards. The DipABRSM requires grade 8 practical, which requires grade 5 theory. Grades from other boards are accepted but it also notes that grade 5 theory is required in addition, though from any board. All the higher diplomas require lower ones, so ...


0

With ABRSM, to take any grade higher than V in practical, one must pass grade V theory. Best bet is to look on the ABRSM site for FAQs, or to find a phone number to call - they are very helpful.


1

This is a common beginner problem, and there are exercises you can use to help you. It sounds like you want to gain independence of the fingers. In addition to finding a reputable exercise volume that includes finger independence exercises, you can do the following things: Practice scales, two to four octaves up and down, all twelve keys, especially with ...


0

Go to a music store and ask for the method books section. Grab a little stack of volume 1 books from different series. Take them over to the electric piano demo area and try out some of their tunes. I am very partial to anything by Faber and Faber. And I absolutely LOVE Waxman's Exertudes. You'll probably have to order this. But these etudes give you ...


2

Bach Prelude BWV 938 I googled Bach e minor and looked at images. ...


6

The C and A Altered Dorian scales you show, are simply Dorian Modes with fourth degrees raised by a Semitone. So, to work out the Altered Dorians starting on the other pitches: firstly, work out the Dorian modes starting on each of these pitches; secondly, raise the fourth degree of each of these modes by a semitone. There are two easy ways to work out the ...


1

To my mind scales and arpeggios are something you should consider. There's a lot written about them in various answers on this site, but from your angle, they will help to create independence between the fingers of each hand, and each hand itself. As the fingering for each scale is different, (when looking at each hand), as you play, although the notes will ...


1

When starting to work on any technique like this, I've found it's good to isolate it down to something so incredibly simple that you are focusing only on the technique and its clarity and not at all on the happenings of a piece. You can use a very simple five finger exercises you already know very well (ex. Hanon 1), but to start, I would recommend just ...


0

One of the Guitar's greatest features in my mind is the ability to play multiple voices but still have the dynamic abilities of a string instrument. That is why it is possible to play piano music on the guitar. If you are able to do good transcription the proverbial music world is your oyster. Is there someone that composes for the guitar like this? ...


2

A large number of Isaac Albeniz pieces were originally written for piano, then transcribed (with his approval) by Tarrega for the classical guitar. These pieces are now part of the standard repertoire for guitar. My favourites are probably "Cordoba" and "Asturias(Leyenda)" - you'll find them recorded everywhere. Now I mention it, you might like to search ...


3

Great responses. I recommend the following (I used to do this often): Take any given passage that involves that "finger stuck" problem. Using the correct fingering as if you would normally play it (it would be helpful to write down the correct fingering if you are not comfortable remembering it), play those two notes (thumb and index finger) while also ...


4

You can focus much more easily on the dynamics by making everything else easier (and thus either automatic or requiring little attention). You could practise playing this way with a simpler piece or one you already know well. Slowing down is also very effective — as a extreme example, if you're only pressing one note every 10 seconds is makes it ...


7

Widor's suggestion of slowing down is great. Another than can be used in conjunction with it or on its own is to play staccato. Staccato obviously necessitates lifting your fingers back off the keys, and it will change the sound drastically to ensure that you are concentrating on it. It also has the added benefit of building strength, which can help you ...


9

Releasing notes after the correct duration is all part of practising. Just as the attack of a note starting at the right time is important, so is the release. I practice this by slowing the tempo right down, by half or even more. Whatever you need to give yourself enough 'thinking time'. Then really focus on each note length and when notes in each voice get ...


3

As a mature (elderly?) learner, I faced a similar difficulty about a year ago, and found these ideas helped: With the "quiet" hand, keep the fingers as close to the keys as possible at all times (if possible, make sure that they never actually lose contact with the keys) and lift the fingers of the other hand off the keys before playing the note (loudly). ...


2

I like Topo Morto's answer, but here's what I'd like to add: To learn to feel and play any new style of music, the best thing you can do is listen. That is, after all, almost certainly how you first became familiar with what you're already used to. Try to find CDs or records (if that's what you're into) of or purchase digital copies online of albums or ...


4

A few caveats to buying sheet music: Music for "piano/guitar/voice" often does not have the complete guitar version. If you are a guitarist, look for TABs to lend a possible greater authenticity. If the music is labeled EASY or something similar, then it is unlikely to be anywhere near authentic. Some sheet music will leave out the melody, some will not. ...


1

This depends on the arrangement. Often you will see music which has scores for piano and one singer, with chords over the score. In which case you can expect the piano part to sound fine on its own. If there are notes in place for all parts, you can probably expect there to have been more thought put in to how the parts play together and interact. Removing ...


0

I can confirm the stretching aspect. The distance between tip of pinky and tip of thumb on my left hand is noticeably longer than on my right hand. This is due to 8-10 years of typical left hand positions of playing large intervals. Now I find myself attempting to play a major 10th that involves white and black keys (example: E major, 5 on E, 2 on B, 1 on ...


0

There's a musician I know who through some congenital problem, illness or accident has fingers that barely extend to the first knuckle. Maybe he shouldn't aim to be a concert pianist. But in his chosen field of theatre music, his piano playing is amazingly adequate!


1

Not only is music of that time available, virtually all of it is well in the public domain by now. imslp.org has more early piano music available than you can play in a lifetime of parties.


2

Yes. Most music for piano is within 5 octaves and even if you find music that is outsize what I'm assuming is the range F2 - F6 you can transpose it and rearrange the music as necessary.


1

Usually with a book of etudes, the thing to do is to work on one for about two weeks, give or take, allowing the tempo to increase by itself, guided by comfort, and then move on to the next etude. After a couple of months of this, you can start cycling back to the first, and continuing to review. This means that if you spend 8 minutes working on the etude ...


2

Don't get down on yourself about it, it's incredibly common. Like Dom said, metronomes are your best friend. My favorite way to practice a song: set the metronome to whatever pace you can play the whole song without stopping and with minimal mistakes. Then, every day, increase the metronome speed by 1bpm until you eventually get to the speed that the song is ...


1

The book doesn't specify what path to take for a good reason and that is the final goal is to master them a faster speed and exact path you take isn't as important as where you end up. A simple example is you may find that exercise 2 is easier for you then exercise 1 so you may be able to master exercise 2 at a bpm of 108 before you are able to master ...


0

When doing any technical exercise, like Hanon, practice moving as quickly as you can with good technique. Think of scales - when you were learning them, you did them until you "learned" them, and then added more. As you progressed, you learn to get the tempo higher more quickly than on the previous one, and the ones you already learned continued to get ...


2

Playing too fast is a sign that you are focusing on the notes rather than the music. That is your motor reflexes are taking over the performance rather than your listening and interpreting head. As others mentioned, adrenaline might speed up your "flow". Try breaking up its effect by being comfortably below your limits and varying the tempo consciously, ...


7

It's most likely just a side effect of the adrenaline you get when performing, similarly to how someone will speak faster if they are nervous. It's a very common phenomenon and most musicians don't notice when it happens. Practicing with a metronome in general will make sure you start and consistently stay at the desired tempo. When performing you're most ...


1

It sounds like you are noticing the beat frequency, which is completely normal and something you ought to hear on a proper piano as well. A lot of old/upright pianos will have a somewhat muddy sound (compared to the concert grand emulated by most digital pianos) which could make it less noticeable, though. A minor second is quite a dissonant interval so I ...


2

The fingering you're using looks fine to me, although coming down you may want to adjust the first figure and personally I would use (1,3,1) instead for the begining to keep it closer to the chromatic scale fingering. Coming down 1,2,1,2,3,5 may not work well. In my head it seems like it would be easier fingering it a different way and it's not unheard of ...


2

So, in technique and practice, is it actually required that you "train" to >the point where you become mentally aware that you're pressing "C D E F G A >B C - C B A G F E D C", or is it just a finger/mental exercise? You've already got lots of great answers, but just a quick note about the above. A piano method will usually recommend not just notes, ...


2

While only skimming the other answers, let me answer it simply this way: How difficult was it for you to learn how to read and write? Think of all the different combinations of letters and spaces that are required in order for this sentence to "make sense" to you. The same applies to music although much more simply. As you learn your scales, you will ...


4

In fact there are 12 major scales (one for each root note) and 12 minor scales -- and there are other scales too - chromatic scales, various pentatonic scales, blues scales... the list goes on and on. However, don't be daunted. Most people don't even learn all the major scales -- there is a smaller group that are most commonly used, because they are easier ...


4

When reciting poetry, you don't just need to learn the sounds of the 26 letters, but also the sounds of various combinations, partly even those of whole words. I mean, compare "bough", "rough", "dough", "cough", "plough", "tough". Then you need to learn where to stress each word, just compare "determinate" and "determination" where the word ending affects ...


5

Just think about what you have to memorize in order to drive a car! The accelerator opens the throttle to give more power to the engine. If you want to accelerate at the rate of two miles per hour per second, you have to push it down by a precise amount, plus or minus a certain amount if you are going uphill or downhill. At the same time you do this, you ...


0

See Quantz Versuch einer Anweisung die floete traversiere zu spielen, Chapter XVII, subchapter VII, 58. ยง: The correct tempo of a sarabande is quarter = 80 per minute. Please, don't listen too much to wrong examples ...


4

it seems that playing deeply between the black keys is the right thing to do, because it makes it easier to press the black key as needed. That is correct, for passages with a fair number of black keys in use. But your hand needs to be free to move in and out of the black-key zone. In all-white or almost-all-white-key passages, the default position is ...


9

It's always counter-productive to feel horrified while you're trying to learn something! At your level, please don't feel you have to memorize your fingering or your black-white key patterns. For now, make sure each scale you work on feels comfortable and smooth. What you are mainly doing at this point is getting some fluency, practicing these figures out ...


3

Instead of learning the "best" or "correct" fingering for every different scale, I think it's better to learn some general principles, and then work out the details for yourself. The repeated pattern of fingers is 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 - but not necessarily starting on 1, because .... Don't use your thumb on the black keys. With the right hand, use your thumb on ...


2

If you compare the standard modern piano keyboard with other older keyboard instruments like the pipe organ or harpsichord, you will notice there is a much deeper region of white keys on the piano in front of the black, and also that the black keys are longer. The basic reason for that is the difference in playing technique caused by the greater force needed ...


8

Playing deeply between the black keys can be problematic. Suppose you want to play a C major scale; only white keys. Now you don't need to play any black keys, but you need to move your fingers over them. If you want to play this at larger speeds, this becomes a major obstacle. Another example is playing a large chord, say, B flat - E - G - C (C dominant ...


3

To a great extent it is going to depend on the physiology of ones hands and fingers. Some players tend to use very curved fingers, others fairly straight. You may have noticed this on videos. There can be no right or wrong with this, or maybe even any common ground. In 50-odd years of playing (some very odd...) it's a question I've never asked myself. ...


2

Being nervous about playing music in front of others is not that uncommon. I really don't think that you should meet with a professional to understand the problem. Unfortunately the solution to this issue is to put yourself in uncomfortable positions where you're forced to play in front of others so that you can overcome the nervousness. Familiarity breeds ...


2

Record yourself. Once you can create a usable audio recording, make a video, with the intent to put it up on some video platform (be sure to use material that is not under copyright in order to avoid the pesky rightholder corporations barging down your door). You'll be surprised at the level of focus and self-consciousness and number of retakes it takes to ...



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