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Assuming you have not tried solfege, or your teacher has not introduced you to solfege, i thought i might share this tip. From my experience i have found that solfege helps a lot. Although it is mostly done for singing, it helps with identifying notes and intervals as well. This is how it works: (i am explaining step-by-step, which is a bit long, so please ...


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What I found to be really helpful at least when it can to two-note interval training was to associate a song with an interval. For example a p4 amazing grace, p5 (personally I think of an iron maiden song) however, a good choice would be twinkle twinkle little star p8 somewhere over the rainbow. As for building onto this check out the very relevent posting. ...


1

I think you are looking in the wrong place. There are many printed books on the subjects you are interested in, in libraries. These books have been written since the time of Schubert and Rachmaninov, but their contents have not made it onto the Internet. For example, I did a quick search at Google Books to find references to old books in libraries for ...


1

The reason why the circle of fifths progression works better in minor than in major is the higher flexibility of minor, in the sense that more notes are available than in major, without the need for alteration. In minor, all notes from natural, melodic, and harmonic minor are available without leaving the key. This is not the case in major. The consequence ...


2

One big chord in question is the 7. In minor, if unaltered, this chord is a subtonic chord, as opposed to its altered version where it is the leading-tone chord. So in C minor, diatonically, the 7 chord (subtonic) is Bb D F, while the leading-tone chord would be B D F. You can hear right away that in the minor mode, the subtonic leads just fine to the ...


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Probably because that elusive dim chord moves towards the V then to i in minor better.Or it sounds better as a m7b5 as a 4 note chord, giving the same effect.In major, it sounds quite weak without the root (a 5 note) which would make it a V7.


1

A classical education ultimately prepares you for sight-reading and reproduction. But in the process, there is of course a lot of execution skills as well as getting exposed to a lot of different thoughts and media. There is no way to get exposed to music better than playing it. Should someone wanting to be a poet recite other people's poetry? How else ...


1

Fluctuations in the relative humidity and other environmental conditions in the room where the piano is located can result in movement of the wood components which can affect the tuning of the entire piano - not just one key (although some are affected more than others). Some movement of the wood is unavoidable and all pianos will go out of tune to one ...


2

A single key getting out of tune with itself, where that keys' strings stop being perfectly in tune, is precisely what makes a piano sound bad (to my ear at least) and is certainly common since it would be weirder if all 3 strings on each key did go out of tune at exactly the same rate. You can easily tell by playing single keys, if any sound out of tune ...


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WiFi is unlikely, at least not with regard to radio interference: that's rather weak. Mobile phones, however, are pretty strong in that regard. They don't just need to get through to the next few rooms but half across town. That results in seriously stronger potential for interference.


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A vacuum cleaner. True story: a friend of mine used to be an organ tuner. So he was there in a church, doing the final intonation of the registers (that's even after the tuning, making sure that all of a register responds in style and consistently) and all the personnel had been notified of the requirements for absolute silence. So he is working on this ...


2

The point of unequal well-tempered tunings is that the keys don't sound the same. Temperaments like Werckmeister III or Vallotti or 18th century French ordinaire are meant to be usable in any key while letting each have its own colour. (Vallotti is quite commonly used on fortepianos.) For most of what you're doing, you could probably get away with a mean ...


2

Equal temperament is key-agnostic. Well-tempered tuning isn't. The point of well-tempered tuning is that all keys are tolerable, but some are still better than others and each has its own character. This own character was pretty much the whole point of Bach's "Wohltemperirtes Clavier" (it is usually assumed that some Werckmeister tuning reflects the ...


4

Other editions make it clearer: trill each note, starting on the note rather than the auxiliary (where he specifies it with an accacciatura). You can see it in Scharwenka's edition here. Edit: I should clarify this a bit: Chopin is using accacciature in this passage to specify the starting notes of the trills.


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the chord tones for #IVdim are: #iv, vi, i , ##ii (where these refer to scale degrees). This contains two tones that are already part of Imaj6: vi, i And it contains two tones that lead into two more Imaj basic chord tones: iv# --> v ii## -->iii so you have a chord that has two leading tones into the target chord, this is why it is a natural choice of ...


2

While Matt's answer is not wrong, I would include a few other thoughts. My initial thought was that this could be a Common Tone Diminished chord. From my experience, this is something that has typically been associated with the Classical repertoire but could certainly be applied elsewhere. This would specifically apply to fully diminished 7 chords, not ...


1

Enharmonically this is the same as Idim7 -> I(maj7), which is a common progression (at least in jazz or jazzy arrangements). One famous example is the beginning of the jazz standard Misty by Erroll Garner. If you really have #IVdim7 -> I(maj7) then you probably actually have #IVdim7 -> I(with 5 in the bass), so the bassline moves up chromatically.


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The one that immediately comes to mind for me is the jazz tune "Autumn Leaves." It was originally written in Gm, but for analysis purposes it's easier to think of in, say, Em. In that case the chord progression goes Am7 - D7 - Gmaj7 - Cmaj7 - F#m7b5 - B7 - Em7 (ivm7-VII7-IIImaj7-VIMaj7-iim7b5-V7-im7) - and there's your diatonic 4-7-3-6-2-5-1 progression ...


5

I'm not sure if you're interested in classical examples, but this kind of thing happens all the time in Baroque music, almost to the point of being ubiquitous. One quick example that pops to mind is this section from Brandenburg Concerto #2. Start the passage right at (or slightly before) 2:00 (apparently SE doesn't honor t=### tags in youtube links). This ...


1

Especially in minor you'll find this progression quite often, actually so often that it has become a cliché which many people try to avoid. One example of this progression (in minor) is "Still Got The Blues" by Gary Moore (in A minor, so it starts on the D minor chord). The II chord (which would be the VII chord of the relative major key) is a ...


2

I am a Registered Piano Technician with the Piano Technicians Guild. Pianos go out of tune during a move due to humidity differences and/or the different shape of the floor. The floor can slightly twist the piano which knocks it out. Now, let's be reasonable here. Was this piano tuned every four months? Are you going to keep tuning it every four months? ...


1

I'd leave it for a week or so, as it's in a different environment - may be warmer, colder, more/less humid than its last home. Then get it tuned. You may have a nasty little surprise, especially if it's a wooden frame, when the tuner says he can't bring it back to concert pitch. Maybe he will over two or three tunings - maybe it doesn't matter to you, but if ...


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Before making holes in the floor, attach a strip of carpet or similar to the underside of the pedal, long enough for your foot to rest on the carpet while the pedal is in a comfy position. Your foot will keep it from sliding away. Where it goes is more important for your comfort than to be in a standard position, and there's no industry standard.


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There isn't really a standard for that. Every piano I've seen has a different key height, pedal position and sensitivity. Especially upright pianos suffer from some physical limitations. Also they need to fit players of every size. That's why many piano pedals are actually L shaped. It usually takes some time to get used to playing a piano for the first ...


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You asked about costs. Keep in mind while the acquisition costs can be as low as the cost to move a real piano (you can get them for free) there are greater costs associated with maintenance and future moving of a real piano. You can be sure if the costs is low or free for a real piano, it will at the very least need to be tuned. That may cost $75.00 to ...


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From the view point of pure economics, electronic keyboard is probably unbeatable. Even if it would fail after some time, a year, you can buy a dozen of them the price of even cheap acoustic (cheapest electronic Yamaha NP 31 B - $ 315, cheapest acoustic Yamaha B1 PE - $4320, same shop). Only the most expensive electronic devices may cost that much, but the ...


0

In the flat with the central heating, humidity may get very low if its cold outside. This is probably an attempt to prevent the wood of the instrument from over-drying. More safer and reliable seems to control the humidity inside the room. I would buy a simple cheap humidity indicator and some air humidifier. In comparison to the assumed price of acoustic ...


4

You can use heat reflecting panels between radiator and piano to have some protection. This helps radiator to heat only the circulating air but not the surfaces it sees directly. Also place a bowl of water with a wide surface (for better evaporation) under the piano and over the radiator to increase humidity during heating season.


3

A couple of feet is as close as you want to be. It depends also on how hot that rad gets, and how long it's on for daily. One of mine is about 3 feet away, but because it has an iron frame, it's not been a problem. Wooden framed pianos can get dehydrated causing all sorts of nasties.


1

It's how the practice pedal, when fitted originally, would work. Sometimes, the pedal moves all the hammers sideways, in order that one string out of two or three are not hit, and the lower hammers sort of glance off the side of the strings (from memory). So, it's not a problem, and could be removed easily when the neighbours have gone! The high strings may ...


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The sustain (damper) pedal on a studio piano pushes a rod which connects to the lever which connects to the dampers. This is adjustable with a screw, to allow the dampers to rest on the strings (apart from the top octave or so) with the correct pressure, when the pedal is at rest. It sounds like the dampers are not pressing enough. It won't be a feature, and ...


0

For a beginning piano student you can get by with a less expensive digital piano made by Williams, Yamaha or Casio. In order to better translate the feel to a real piano, you will want fully weighted keys that feel more like a real piano. Don't fall for the semi weighted - and touch sensitive is not the same as weighted. Since space is a concern, the ...


2

In scores for greater ensembles as well as for instrument groups (say 2 bassoons and contrabassoon notated in the same score) the dynamic is typically written below the voice it belongs to.


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On piano music, with treble and bass clefs, if the dynamics mark is between them, it refers to both parts (hands). If it's for the treble, it's found above the treble, and if for bass alone, it's found under the bass.


2

I'm guessing it lives somewhere in England now, in a centrally heated house. Not too close to a rad or South facing window,I hope! If the frame is indeed wooden as opposed to iron, it will benefit from having a cup of water (or something with a larger surface area) in the bottom, as it will help to stop the wood drying out. This starts the pins on their way ...


7

That might depend on where the piano was made [& how carefully], its intended market locale & whether it has subsequently been moved from that location. A good piano maker will season the wood it is to be made from in the country of the intended final destination so the entire seasoning is done in similar climatic conditions to those in which the ...


3

It is about talent, dedication, concentration, familiarity with the culture, capacity of brain-muscle coordination and ability to self-criticize. There are many examples of incredibly successful performers and musicians in other genres then classical music, who start playing instruments quite late like 15-20 years old. One reason for that is the classical ...


4

It depends on how you use your practice time, your tenacity, creativity, business acumen, opportunities you create, and good ol' fashioned LUCK. More practice is not necessarily better - use your practice time wisely. A strict concert pianist, where you travel the world and people listen to you play, is rare. Often pianists will have that be a part of what ...


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There is at least one example of a concert pianist who started when he was 14 -- Nicholas McCarthy, who as well as starting late, has the disadvantage of being born with only one hand! So it is possible. Do bear in mind that 99.9% of the pianists who start earlier than the age of 7, do not become concert pianists either.


5

Not only are pianos heavier than you probably think - but also the weight distribution is uneven. They are difficult objects to move safely. This is what professionals do: The piano is transported to the truck using a dolly - that is a flat trolley with big strong castors. For a grand piano, the legs get removed and the piano is balanced on its side. ...


0

Typically some parts are dismounted from a piano before transporting it (at least as soon as stairs are involved) to reduce the weight of the main chunk such as the front board below the keys. You may omit this if you are prepared to find new voluntaries for the next piano move, especially for older taller models. In any case afterwards a re-tuning is ...


4

I assume you are talking about a grand piano. It is possible to snap the legs off when pushing it, if a caster gets stuck. It is rare that it happens, but you definitely want to make sure it NEVER happens to an instrument that weighs 300 pounds and costs $10,000 (or $100,000). When professional movers move a piano from one side of a room to another, ...


1

I believe this is what you're referring to. This is known as "multiple voices", where music consists of two or more melodic lines. In this case, this would be a vocal piece, but if you had to play it on piano, you'd have 4 independent melodic lines to play. Take a look at bar 4. The notes that have the stems facing upwards are one "voice" and the notes with ...


1

If you really want to know, get an appraisal from a professional. Find a qualified piano tuner/piano technician in the area where the piano is, and pay that person for a house call and for their basic one-hour charge to tune a piano. The technician can examine the piano and tell you how much work and how much money will be required to bring it up to playable ...


3

If you are looking at used acoustic pianos, you can find them from anywhere from a few hundred to tens of thousands of dollars. For under $1000, the market is very much buyer beware. Unless you have access to an expert, or are buying from someone you trust to know the instrument’s history, and who tells you that the instrument has been well cared for and ...


1

Both have pitfalls that can cause what looks like a good financial deal into a bad one. Electronic keyboards vary widely in key feel, and no matter how casual a player you may be, the more you vary from true piano action, the less satisfactory the key board will be. That said, there are some fairly economical models with decent key feel. Look for some used ...


1

Which is more economical depends on the quality of the piano you want to get. You could buy a keyboard with piano sounds really cheaply. Reading you question it seems like you want to have something a little more serious though. If you want to get your hands on a piano very cheaply, you could check a site like Ebay/Craigslist. I don't know here you live, ...


0

Oncosts for a studio piano will be more as it will need tuning at approx £40-£50 sterling ideally once or twice a year. The comparative costs of each is too subjective for any more in this answer.


0

If you don't already, then figuring out the single-line [vocal] melody for the song as well as the chords would probably be useful, e.g. how you'd play the song with one finger only. But maybe that's too basic an answer and you do this already?


8

To add to Bob's good answer - three main things which can make a piano worth keeping: if the frame (harp) is wooden, then the pins are likely, on an old piano, to be loose, so when it's tuned (up, usually), it won't keep pitch. The frame needs to be iron. Heavier, yes but firmer and stronger, too. If the strings are vertical, it will be o.k., but with an ...



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