New answers tagged

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ORGANIZED TRÍO is the best VST, use it with your DAW (i use it with FL Studio), it comes with a demo mode window but after a few minutes playing its disappears and you can review the program and save your preset.


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Right hand plays random notes in Blues escale in c: https://www.google.fr/search?num=100&safe=off&espv=2&q=blues+piano+scale+in+c&oq=blues+piano+scale+in+c&gs_l=serp.3..0i22i30l4.146.1183.0.1342.6.6.0.0.0.0.162.523.0j4.4.0....0...1c.1.64.serp..2.4.521...0i67.WglvX6UOkDM Left hand plays C mayor chord, F mayor chord and G mayor chord. ...


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I have never heard of one-handed practice actually being harmful for any piece of music, nor that it might teach you something you would later have to unlearn. Slow practice and one-handed practice have both been essential to me on the piano, (although separating the limbs doesn't seem to help me on drums, interestingly), and one thing that helps very much ...


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In terms of pieces, you can try to learn some Grade 1 pieces first, and if those are really too difficult, you can do your Prep Test first. It's designed for beginners who have been playing for six to nine months, so you shouldn't be too far off from where you are. The preparation for the Prep Test should get you to the level where you can at least try Grade ...


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The "classical" technique for repeated notes, in twos or threes, is to "change fingers", e.g. fingering a fast triplet 1,2,3. This may be what Tim meant.


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There is a link at the bottom on this page http://www.piano.christophersmit.com/repetitionMech.html which has an animation of how the repetition mechanism works in a grand piano action. I would expect a piano tech did a careful job of regulating those pianos before that performance! The grand piano repetition action works well, and is consistent between the ...


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The key recovery time on grand pianos is much less than on uprights, due to a different mechanism, so it's more difficult to execute this on most uprights.Thumb,index and middle are the usual way, with the hand suspended over the key.


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In this link, from the ABRSM forums, the first individual to answer suggests that it's the end of Book 2 and the beginning of Book 3 that is the ABRSM Grade 1 Standard. You may also be interested in this thread from Piano World. Typically it's looked down upon to offer an outside link without a summary, but it's a little tough to summarize that thread; it ...


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There are various organizations in music that lay out what students should learn at different stages. The one I've heard of most of is ABRSM(http://us.abrsm.org/en/our-exams/piano/piano-grade-1/). It tests at 8 different levels, with the highest being a competent pianist, ready to enter a good college music program. If you look at their requirements at ...


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I looked up "bass clef quiz" and found a number of good hits. No doubt some of these links will be broken before long, but hopefully that query will find new ones by then :) http://www.studybass.com/tools/bass-clef-notes/ http://notationtraining.com/bass-clef-practice Edit: I just created one of my own. http://bassclef.info/


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Most likely, the person who re-attached the pedal lyre to the piano after it was moved did something wrong. I would suggest first removing the lyre completely, so you can get a clear view of all the parts of the mechanism. If the dampers work correctly with the lyre off, use your common sense to figure out how the parts should fit together. Possibly the ...


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In terms of Liszt’s music, the label “piano transcription” is often misleading. Although Liszt did write many (relatively) faithful transcriptions, such as the Beethoven Symphony series, most of his derivative works were concert paraphrases or “enhanced” transcriptions, such as his version of Danse Macabre. Among piano composers, Liszt was one of the ...


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The rod that joins the pedal to the mechanism has moved, or needs adjusting. Maybe it's just dropped out of the correct position. Look under the piano,and try to see where the rod goes. It should be a simple fix, without reference to a tuner.


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Try to get hold of some easy piano tutors, even very simple ones for children, perhaps. There are also some very easy pieces by serious composers you might look at. When I started, as a mature learner, one of the things I used at the start was book 1 of Bartok's Mikrokosmos. The first pieces are very simple with both hands playing in parallel one or two ...


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play Chopin prelude 24 in D minor, it also teaches to stretch and move the left hand, play one hand loud, other silent, play different asynchronized trills and arppegios on strings and other instruments, warm hands in hot bath water, grasp a sport expander or a silicone balls, find some synchronized pivot notes which sound together in both hands, learn ...


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About a year ago I decided to start working on sight-reading. I'm a professional jazz musician and that I have two degrees in music composition already. I have been hired a lot to read music because I'm fairly proficient at it. But I always wanted to get to a different level. One thing I have found, is that it's important to read different styles of music. I ...


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The exercise I find most useful to improve speed and muscle tone, on a piano or away from one, is a technique that I believe was (is) used by the Russian school: I know it as legato technique. take a succession of notes you want to improve on (be it a Hanon exercise, a scale, or a section of the piece you actually play) press the first finger in the ...


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I almost always have a piano. But the best exercise for my fingers when away from it, is "playing" piano exercises on my leg. Position your hands so that they are comfortably over your body surface. Bend your elbows to a comfortable angle. When standing, my front pants pockets are in the right place for me. Hanon exercises are great. All you need is the ...


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Playing the 1 op 10 after 5 years is a little "ambitious" should we say :-) That being said: that etude has caused tendinitis to many piano players so be on the watch for that: never let the increased speed cause you to tense up your forearm. Not to mention that relaxing will be key to keep your performance accurate. accuracy is tough on that etude as ...


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This was intended to be a comment, but since I don't have enough reputation I must write it down here. Joseem gave you very good advices, but I wanted to add a few things. No one requests you to play at 170 bpm. There's no point in trying to play like Cziffra and other professionals. If you can play it consistently at 130 bpm and cannot go any higher, ...


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It's not always easy to tell, but here we are definitely talking about a tie. How to distinguish? A tie is sole functional and can only connect equal pitches (there is the tricky exception of a tie connecting enharmonically equivalent notes in a modulation but the execution would be to hold the note without noticeable intonation correction). Does that ...


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Yes, it's a tie. You have to play the C once and hold it for 6 quarters. To tell the difference, keep in mind that slurs are used between different notes and ties are used between the same notes. For instance:


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I can play it consistently at 130, but every time I try to go higher, I stumble and play very badly. Don't forget the remark attributed to Einstein: "Insanity is endlessly repeating the same procedure, but hoping for a different result". If you are "stuck" at a particular tempo, and you have been playing for (only) 5 years, most likely your technique ...


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First of all, attempting that piece after 5 years of study is probably too early. I guess it's possible, depending on your study "regimen" for these 5 years, your age, and your natural talent, but to give you a reference, Chopin's Op.10 is in the Syllabus of the Associate Diploma (ARCT) in Piano Performance of UK's Royal Conservatory. I'm not fully familiar ...


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With 6 notes and 5 fingers, you obviously need one hand position change in each sextuplet. Work systematically through every possibility of where to use your thumb in the middle of each group, then find the best way to finger the other notes around that thumb position. The "best" fingering for you will depend on the size of your hand and your playing ...


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Thelonious Monk played many pieces at an easy pace. Your challenge with him will be figuring out his chords. Bud Powell also plays at a moderate pace and uses simple chord voicings. But if it's simple speed that's an issue for you then try Software that slows down music to help in transcribing


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Wynton Kelly played a fairly simple, blues-influenced style. His solo on "Freddie the Freeloader" is a good first solo to learn.


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The simplest answer is "just try not doing it, and see what happens". You aren't going to injure yourself permanently by not going through your lengthy warming up procedure for a few days. If you don't discover any downside, you just gained a few more hours in each day, either to practice longer or do something else. Personally, I would consider spending ...


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Which leads me to wonder - just how much difference is there between a decent contemporary digital piano (something on the order of $1000 or more) and an acoustic piano? If put to the test, would the experts be able to tell the difference? Or perhaps it's time we revised this "old truth"? Does anybody have any hard evidence on this? Any double-blind AB ...


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B# and C are basically the same note. They are called enharmonic tones. In modern musical notation and tuning, an enharmonic equivalent is a note, interval, or key signature that is equivalent to some other note, interval, or key signature but "spelled", or named differently. The one note differs from the other depending on the harmony of the song. ...


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Digital and acoustic piano's are 2 different beasts and it completely depends on what you are using them for wether the analog or the digital is the best. It is not the same as comparing an electric and acoustic guitar. Both are guitars with strings the only difference is how the sound of the strings is amplified. A digital piano on the other hand contains ...


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What about a pre-warm-up, and a pre-pre-warm-up! Unless you're going to be playing frantic tunes, or very complex stretchy chords, etc., then a gentle warm-up will get you into most.There are many other 'exercises' that will warm-up apart from Hanon. Try playing scales/arpeggios/chromatics/block chords up and down the 'board. Try playing some known pieces, ...


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I own, and have performed on both kinds. I use them for different reasons, in different scenarios. If you can have only one, you should choose according to your needs. What kind of music will you mostly play? Does your digital need to be portable? ACOUSTIC: A good many classical composers have written piano music that deliberately creates an interesting ...


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I'm only a guitarist, but I play once a week on a real piano at my teacher's studio, and I have a Yamaha P-115 digital piano at home (weighted keys, $600 retail most places -- I got lucky and paid $400 at a salvage store). The feel is a bit different between the two, but it's in the ballpark (for a tyro like me). No trouble adjusting. I originally started ...


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The whole point of a digital piano is attempt to re-create an acoustic one. Maybe better isn't the right way to think. There is an instrument called the piano. It's big and feels and sounds a certain way. There are many digital imitations of the real things called pianos. The primary reasons why digital pianos exist in the first place are cost and size. ...


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Yes, the issue of sound is important, and I've heard some really convincing digital pianos over the last few years. But for me, it's another issue entirely: the touch of a digital keyboard compared to a piano. (As such, it may seem like I'm not answering your final two questions, but I am trying to answer the general inquiry from a different perspective.) ...


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I suggest that you play the last bar of the first song, then immediately play the introduction of the second. If there isn't an introduction, use the last two or four bars of that song. Don't over-think this. They don't want a gap, but they ARE two different songs, in different tempos. At some point the music will have to change. Just do it!


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On a keyboard instrument, it means the same as the first example below. If the long note was a half-note rather than a whole-note, it is often written as in the second example. In an orchestral score where the parts for two instruments are written on one staff to save space, it means that one instrument plays the four 8th-notes, and the other instrument ...


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Your basic problem is that your organ technique will "get you by" on the piano in the sense that you can play the right notes at the right time, but the techniques of the two instruments are really very different. Probably the quickest way in the long run is to put most of your effort into technical exercises that force you to use "piano technique" rather ...


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Probably, you are missing the fact that Debussy was writing for a full size acoustic grand piano, not for a small upright or a digital piano that doesn't have a good implementation of the sustain pedal function. On a concert grand, the bass strings have enough energy that a quick up-and-down movement of the pedal has very little effect. A quick pedal change ...


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Relaxation, both physically and mentally, and not expecting too much too soon, are probably the key aspects. What degrees of dexterity or difficulty in specific aspects of piano playing could be expected, considering you are an experienced organist, is debatable. But what's certain is that anxiety and over expectations will only add to the (presumed) ...


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This is one of those things that makes Debussy really hard, and not really appropriate for a beginner despite the slow tempo. Debussy was an excellent pianist, and it seems that he leaned on his ability as a performer and didn't worry about the notation that much. His piano music is full of places where what's written doesn't match what he intended (we ...


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It seems user314159 got it right in his comment where he said there is no consensus, and to prove it here's yet another approach by the composer and piano pedagogue Louis Kholer, where he, interestingly enough, specifies the finger for the f# in the second (an octave below) passage, but not in the first passage. The two phrases are almost identical and ...


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I would read this as (assuming bass clef) holding the A for 4 beats and the rest of the notes in the arpeggio are not held until you get to the C. this is all done in the left hand.


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There are similar questions around, and this is sort of answered already. The left hand contains two separate 'voices'. The higher one keeps moving upwards, while the lower one stays on and holds the low A. It just happens that both 'voices' start on that same A.


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If learning to play piano is your objective then a used stage piano with onboard speakers is a good option. Most come with MIDI connections so you can connect to computer as required. That way you are free to switch on and play, no connections, with or without headphones, and with other musicians. Learning is challenging enough and added distractions can ...


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Agree with topo. Midi controllers are designed for programming or performing where effects and samples are needed to acheive your task. If playing piano, possibly recording a few pieces is all you are looking for, I would suggest a piano or organ with some on board capability built in. However...weight costs money, and if your budget prohibits you from ...


3

I think it depends very much on whether you take the "old school" view that fingering a passage like this involves "passing the thumb under", or the more modern idea the that driving force comes from your hand and arm moving sideways, and not from your fingers. There is nothing "wrong" with either method. The difference is mainly in how you move and ...


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Just to add some working example to the thread, here goes Prokofiev op. 97, no. 10. An adagio from the Cinderella suite for piano. The complete score for this adagio is available here, page 29. In the first two bars, there are specifications for both staves (forte), and for the upper (piano) and lower (mezzoforte) staves only.



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