New answers tagged

0

There are many exercises you can do when not actually playing the piano. one of my favorites is tapping my fingers on a desk in different rhythms. Personally I like playing with both hands doing the same thing, but that is just personal preference. I like with the right hand 1-3-5-4-3-4-3-2 on the right hand, which is 5-3-1-2-3-2-3-4 on the left hand.


1

Here are the main reasons why legato fingering is advised: There are many times when a note (or notes) is sustained through a pedal change. Sometimes this happens during an harmonic change in the underlying notes, while the melodic note must sustain through to the new harmony. The sustained note can be anywhere, but usually in the melodic and bass lines. ...


1

The ultimate goal is to feel each rhythm independently – triplet in one hand, duplet in the other. There are multiple ways to get there, but the Carol of the Bells example given above is great. Sing the rhythm in syllables (dum da dee da), and clap both hands on your lap. Both hands start together on "dum," right hand "da," left hand "dee," and right hand on ...


0

I have actually thought about this some more and am not sure I fully agree with equating forearm rotation with hand rotation as suggested by the videos that were quoted. I should clarify that I am speaking here from my own intuition and not from strict definitions. I think the hand rotation can certainly be initiated from the forearm as very well explained ...


0

Considering your prior level (Inventions, Fur Elise, etc.), prior amount of practice per week (3 hours), amount of time off (4 years), and current age (17?), you should not have any difficulty picking right back up almost within the first month, maybe even 1-2 weeks. Find a good teacher, listen to that teacher, and enjoy. I promise you that what you're doing ...


0

Should I learn right hand first or try to learn both hands simultaneously? Do you follow any algorithm that helps you with learning new pieces? This really depends on your overall skill level, and what you're trying to achieve in learning a particular piece. If you're advanced enough so that you can read proficiently and have the technique to play ...


0

Rather than deciding between "bright" and "mellow," I suggest searching for a good sound in general and a long sustain. A good piano, one that's properly tuned, voiced, and regulated, will allow you the full spectrum of colors, from bright and brilliant to dark and lush, and the sound should last forever. Even if you prefer one of those two sounds now ...


0

That's how I was taught chords as a child. I did allow me to progress more rapidly and I learned how to play pop songs and accompany singers fairly quickly. However, I'm now struggling to learn the more complex/alternate fingerings as reflected in my question here: Tricks to unlearn chords learned by shape on the piano It all depends on how far you want to ...


1

Today my six year old played a few wrong notes while practicing from his song book. We both looked at each other in surprise, because those notes formed the backbone of another song we had recently heard. I said, "hey, let's pick out the rest of this song by ear." It only took a few tries to discover the first line of the melody. We were stumped at the end ...


7

Some people's calluses seem to be semi-permanent, but others will quickly lose them after a period without playing. There is some related discussion here. However, your concern about tone on the piano is unfounded. Piano keys are not so sensitive that the toughness of your skin is a factor; you have to depress them far more than your finger pads would ...


11

Basically, yes - callouses are your body's protection against damage (that it could incur from pressing hard on the strings, which cut into your flesh) As you become more proficient, you will learn how to press only as hard as is needed, and no more - this will help a lot, but you will still have harder pads on your fingertips. Nylon strung guitars ...


1

If you're really keen on not developing callouses at all, I think the best way would be to soak your fingers in water (maybe with Epsom salts? or just moisturizing soap?) after practicing to let the skin really soften and re-hydrate. Let 'em get prune-y. Then dry thoroughly, let them un-prune, and apply whatever lotion or handcream you usually use. ...


0

I am already playing for years and I do not really have this problem. As you are playing a classical guitar, the nylon strings will normally be very soft to your fingers. Electric guitar strings are a bit 'harder', but in the end they are a whole lot 'smoother' than for example typical folk strings. So I won't worry too much in your case. However, do not ...


7

Part of the problem is that beginners are trying to learn at least three different things at the same time: How to read sheet music How to play their instrument How to play the specific piece that is in front of them. If you concentrate mostly on #3, then learning #1 and #2 will be slower, and (relatively) unstructured and disorganized. You need to work ...


0

There is no 'correct' way to learn a new piece. There are many good ways, but they are quite subjective. They will depend to a degree initially on how good one is at sight-reading. In fact, several of the guys I have played with over the years are so good at sight-reading, they never have to actually 'learn' pieces. If that's not a great indictment to learn ...


1

Are we talking about "piano lesson" playing, or about learning songs? If the former yes, hands seperately, slowly enough to get it RIGHT (and if it isn't right, sort out why - don't just keep making the same fluffs). But if you're learning songs (which "sheet music" suggests you might be) it can be more about finding out how it "goes" and working out what ...


0

I definitely agree with a lot of what Old John pointed out, but I would also like to add certain additional points that are important in my opinion when it comes to learning new pieces. First about the question of whether to learn a piece with both hands toghether first or not: I would say this actually depends on the piece/the section of the piece you ...


2

There really isn't a best way of learning new pieces, at least not one that all piano teachers and pedagogues would agree on. Some insist that learning hands together is best, and others insist that learning each hand separately is better, so really it tends to boil down to which method works best for you, or which method your teacher advises. From my own ...


3

My response might be more abstract than what you are looking for, but I think it's ultimately a healthier mentality. I've included a more concrete example of its implementation at the end. In my opinion, approaching music with a 'lick'-based mentality tends to limit your ability to be open and interactive with yourself and the ensemble/band. I find if more ...


2

An observation about 88 notes on the piano... You can play through the entire major key circle of fifths on the piano starting on the lowest C to the highest C; AND You can play through the entire minor key circle of fifths on the piano starting on the lowest A to the highest A. Interesting how this worked out perfectly!


2

First off, if you are renting where you live, then there's a limit on what you can do that will be effective. The most effective things you can do require modifications and therefore ownership. A little bit of physics: When you play, the piano vibrates the air, the air hits the wall and starts the wall vibrating, some of the energy gets absorbed by the wall ...


0

you need to learn to sightread and know where you are on the keyboard as preliminary you need to know your scales and build your chords off that then practice root position, first inversion, second inversion, (+ further inversions) using hand over hand technique when doing the D7, know that you can always omit the 5th if you'd like. Some do, dome don't ...


0

It is my understanding that some instruments require much more skill in distinguishing notes from one another than others (at least if you want to play well). In music class in elementary school, before selecting band instruments, the teacher gave us each a test, playing two notes on the piano (with her hands hidden from me) and asking which was higher ...


3

"Can someone tell me how many Hanon excersises I should be doing, and for roughly how long I should be doing the exercises before starting my pieces?" One possible answer to this question is: NONE! It is perfectly possible to make great progress with piano without spending any time at all on Hanon. They are very un-musical, and you might make better ...


1

"I find that doing this takes so, so, so much time and I can barely get onto my pieces during my morning practice." You have the answer there. Exercises should only take up a small part of your practice. In music practice you should be working on Warm up Technique Old material New material Theory etc etc


1

I can understand and relate to your frustration. My mother was an accomplished pianist and taught piano. But when she tried guitar, she gave up quickly. She kept the guitar and so growing up I had access to both instruments. I became enamoured with guitar after starting on piano so I have experience learning both. The good news is that if you really ...


0

I agree with the plus-voted answers above, but I'd like to suggest a couple of additional techniques. First, simplify your chord voicings. Start with "shell" or "Bud Powell" chord voicings. Then add color notes: flatted fifths, 11ths, 13ths, etc. Honestly, this is what most jazz piano players do. George Shearing the Block Chord King is dead. Second, try ...


1

Barring physical disability, anyone CAN play any instrument. The easier Bach Inventions are regularly set for Grade 5 examinations, so in 6/7 years, regularly prodded by a teacher but not practicing much, you made rather less than average progress. This indicates a degree of talent, I suppose! Are you taking guitar lessons, or trying to teach yourself?


2

While most answers bring valuable assessments, I would also add the fact that you need to accomodate with the instrument you want to play. Piano players think their instrument differently than guitarist do, same for drums players. So, added to the fact that you must build up your skill, supposedly try to get a teacher or understanding how instrument works, ...


2

There are two basic hurdles to learning a new instrument - the theory, and the technique. For someone who is competent at one instrument, it shouldn't be hard for them to pick up the theory of playing a different one. However, different instruments have different technique challenges. Piano and guitar are relatively simple - it's just a question of where to ...


9

If you have the drive and dedication to get over the initial awkward and difficult learning curve then I don't see why you can't play any instrument you want. When I first started guitar at the age of 15 I played for probably about 3 weeks or so and then "quit" because I was getting so frustrated and felt like I'd never be able to get it. After about 3 ...


17

Depends on what you mean by "may be able". Different instruments and music styles and instruments and practice material pose different hurdles and motivation for different people. That's not specific to playing music but any skill. The less discipline you have, the more you are dependent on upcoming hurdles and short-time rewards matching your current ...


0

I still think the best way to memorize chords is by their sound. To do this you would first need to be familiar with the pitch of every key on the keyboard and their relative pitches. This might seem really basic but is very important, and also fairly easy to accomplish on the keyboard because there are really just 12 keys repeating themselves. Then try to ...


0

I play the bass guitar, but I learned this way of practicing seventh chords and inversions from a saxophone player. Say I am working C Maj 7... I start at the bottom of my instrument and head towards the top of the range: up CEGBC, down ECBGE, up GECBG, down BGECB. Once I reach the top, I come back down again alternating up and down. I do this for each ...


1

Yes, the "Warsaw Concerto" is a piano concerto, and I have heard of high school students playing it as a graduation piece. It is very good for that purpose because it is short and sounds much more difficult to play than it actually is. For the same reasons, it is not likely to impress competition judges. It is very close to Edvard Grieg's piano concerto ...


3

As far as I know there has never been (and probably never will be) a legally binding definition of "piano concerto", or any similar musical term like "sonata", "symphony", etc. But a competition with a "piano concerto" as the final round would usually mean "a concerto that is part of the standard classical repertoire". Even if a 10-minute excerpt from a ...


0

I've settled on practicing each hand separately, with a metronome, for measures 45 - 52 (starting with Tempo I). The hands are sufficiently independent and even-rhythmed that I think I do a decent job when practicing them together. Since the left hand is arpeggiated with a strong tempo while the right hand plays a simple, repetitive, and catchy ...


0

What do you mean by "wrong"? When transcribing music for the piano, the goal is to be faithful to the original while ensuring that the transcription is playable and "pianistic", which is a term-of-art that is not very easily definable. It sounds like you're asking about the rules of traditional Bach-style four-part-harmony. (Or really n-part harmony, where ...


0

You'd need to combine several strategies. Practising polyrhythms as such (away from keybord) until that's easy would be a good start. Break up the score, practise segments of two or three beats in isolation, first each hand separately, then together. Use a metronome and get a feeling for how to fit the required notes into the available time. The midi ...


1

There used to be a series of records called Music Minus One which released many concerto recordings with only the orchestra. Perhaps a search on "Music Minus One" may help. They are still around: http://digital.musicminusone.com/ The other possibility is to find a stereo recording where the soloist has been fed to both channels equally. The channels can be ...


0

You could try a MIDI rendition, there are quite good ones out there, just do a google search. With a MIDI player that allows you instrument selection of muting (VanBasco Karaoke Player is good one and very simple to use), you can mute the harpsichord and play on top. Now, soundwise a MIDI rendition will only be as good as the sounds you have available. The ...


1

In popular music, the most common chord positions are the root and the second inversion. First-inversion chords tend to sound rhythmically "weak". In any case, doubling the third of a major chord between the bass and treble is probably not a good idea, unless you really want that sound for some reason. Try it, and some alternatives, and use your ears! If ...


0

Write your bass line. Then fit harmony notes in as they will. It's quite unlikely that both melody and bass will take the third of a major chord. It's also unlikely that block chords in the piano left hand will sound good. They tend to sound muddy.


0

For chords at the end of the piece (or really important sectional endings) a root position chord is often best. Other places, the choice of root or first inversion should be (at least in my opinion) which one makes the bass line sound best (in the composer's opinion.) Usually (at least in chorale style with 3 or 4 voices) one prefers not to double thirds of ...


13

It is not necessary to double the root when converting guitar chords to piano chords but it could be done if fits better with the music. But there are important distinctions between the guitar and piano that come into play when considering how to notate chords on sheet music. These distinctions center around (and are affected by) the way chords are played ...


3

A pianist is very unlikely to want a literal transcription of what a guitarist does. Anyway, guitarists don't spend all their time strumming 6-string chords! The only answer to this is - it depends. The pianist may be playing one, two...up to six notes in the right hand, a bass line in the left. Or he may be playing a melody in the right hand, chords in ...


4

If you play CEGC, it won't be parallel eighths. It will simply have the octave doubled. In order to have parallel eighths, you have to have the voices move. If you take guitar chords and put them into sheet music for piano, should you double the root ? There isn't any definite answer here. You certainly have to option to easily double the root (C). So, ...


0

You want to record your loudest volume part of the song just below the red peak level. I use the Tascam DR-05 for recording my piano. Using the just below peak level method gives me the same volume level of most all songs in my library. For adjusting the volume after recording as well as all kinds of other adjustments I recommend Audacity. Audacity is ...


2

The current configuration is historically based. Early singing was based on what are now the "white keys" on the piano. Also, in early time, a Bb was added so that the F-B interval (which was considered difficult to sing in tune, compared to other intervals) could be avoided a bit. The early organization (which contemporary music theorists called modes or ...


-1

Hi the issue with the original question is that when forming the standard triad one uses the 1,3,5 fingers on the right hand and 5,3,1 on the left hand. However when forming sevenths one brings in the second finger on both hands. 1,2,3,4 on the right and 5,4,3,2 on the left. This gives the dominant seventh of F as C-1,E-2,G-3 and Bb-4 with the 5 of the right ...



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