New answers tagged

-1

Well IMO the only purpose here is a styling effect while playing. The notes you are playing there are the same movement that the begining ! But it's much more impressive when crossing hands :) I've never asked this question to my teacher but that's my feeling when playing this song. However some songs require hand crossing so the song can be played easily (...


1

Something that requires a bit of tinkering on the software side, would be a Myo Gesture. This can pick up muscle signals, and you can train it to perform certain things. In this particular case you could train it to send midi notes (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIDI), which is a certain format for signals that virutally all keyboards and music-software ...


1

You don't need to reinvent the wheel here - you can already buy solutions. The cheapest option (a few hundred dollars) would be a good quality piano-action MIDI keyboard with the sound generator that is "played" partly by your friend and partly by a computer. At the top end of the price range (up to a few hundred thousand dollars) instruments like the Yamaha ...


3

In various settings, the left hand can do everything that the right hand can do. When musicians first begin playing the piano, it's typically with music where the melody is in the right hand and the chords are in the left hand. As a player becomes more advanced, the melodic line will start to switch between hands. When the player becomes really advanced, ...


1

Avoiding repetitive movement can be important, but I think the reason here is musical more than technical. I've always assumed Beethoven specifically wants two voices here. He's already muddying the waters between anacrusis and phrase, and introducing the second voice takes that idea further. It makes me think of two British people trying to pass through a ...


10

The notation reflects the voicing (if you are having two staves anyway, why write the voicing in a single staff?). But actually executing the voicing with both hands is not the worst idea: it makes it easier to maintain consistent per-voice articulation, phrasing and volume. In this particular case, you'll likely have your hands playing staggered and the ...


-1

It's a bit of flair, showmanship, or showing off! Of course it could all be done with one hand, and, eyes shut, the listener wouldn't tell. But it's a bit of fun. Done because it can be.Maybe there's a subtle difference in the sound, maybe it's one hand in a little conversation with the other, and it makes a change for the player, too.


4

Every edition I've seen has had this, so I assume Beethoven himself wrote it this way. Yes, the hands would switch off. Many people feel that repetitive motion should be avoided when possible, which is more commonly seen on repeated single notes: Many editors and teachers will suggest 3-2-1-3-2-1 etc. or something similar. As the player, you can choose to ...


0

Not being a musician but trying to play for years on the accordion. Here's my two cents worth having played a guitar in my teen years (strumming chords was much easier than plucking the correct string all the time). With a regular piano or piano accordion, you will need to make what seems like huge stretches at times of your hand. Ex. play a G7 and start ...


0

The origin of the Sarabande is dance associated with Palo Mayombe in Cuba. Sarabande comes from the Bantu word Nsala-Banda which, taken literally, means Begin the Spirit, perhaps a nod to spirit possession associated with the dance, or meaning to get wild. Nsala-Banda or alternatively Zarabanda is the name of the god (mpungu) of iron and war, for whom the ...


2

Your question is a good one, but I think you can go about it in a slightly different way and end up with much more meaningful results. If we acontextually (that is, away from the music itself) try to compile a list of various musical traits, it will never be complete and it will never be specific enough. So instead of trying to list musical traits and then ...


1

This is a very wide topic, but think about how you would approach recordings of two of your favourite jazz pianists. Do they have some favourite runs or chord sequences that crop up again and again? How do they handle the beat? Tight, or loose? Always ahead of the 3rd beat in a bar? How about volume, and sustain? Do they generally approach runs in a smooth ...


0

If what you are looking for is accuracy in subdividing beats into 3,4,5,etc. then it might be worth looking at the Scriabin Etudes. They are not at all easy but there are lots of complex rythmic ideas there.


0

It's true that over a C chord, the main notes you'll sing are from that C chord (CEG), but other notes are bound to be in there somewhere. Otherwise it'll start to sound like arpeggio practice time. By main notes, I mean the ones that are more emphasised - often 1 and 3 in the bar. For example, if there were a D,E,F,and G as 4 crotchets in a particular bar, ...


2

Pitch matching and ear training is very useful for learning. One of the primary goals is simply to accustom your voice and your ear to a consistent set of pitches or intervals, enabling you to reproduce them with ease and recognize if you're singing off-key. Singing along with scales also helps with things like quick note transitions when doing runs of ...


1

Here's a template: Piano Keyboard Diagrams to Print Out. You could also buy the stickers which are widely available. For example, Keysies Transparent Plastic Removable Piano and Keyboard Note Stickers


1

This doesn't exactly answer your question, but I think there is an important point to make. At this point in my studies, I was getting all of my examples from the standard literature. It's my strong opinion that exercise books like this be kept to a minimum, and not be used at all once someone is sufficiently advanced (such as they would be by the time they ...


0

You can isolate each note one by one and find chords that sound well with it. Now the trick is that the next chord must 'flow' nicely while coming from the previous one so that it won't sound like some random chords, but chords related to each other. There is a really interesting done by Publio Delgado here, that uses popular youtube videos and harmonizes ...


0

I know there are many answers already, but as a self taught pianist myself, I have realized that people really enjoy listening to my music, whether I composed it or not, when I play it with passion! If you have ever composed a piece, you'll realize that every note you give has a purpose. A softness. Meaning. Try composing just a tiny little song, and play it ...


2

The notes would be grouped 8 - 8, except that the notation in the first bar shows (by the stem directions and the rests) that the left hand plays the first 7 notes (written with stems down) and the right hand the remainder (with stems up). Beethoven wrote this concerto to perform himself, so the notation that shows how the notes are split between the hands ...


1

Steps to improvising a melody from random notes: Sing the notes to yourself. See if by singing the notes over and over you spontaneously create a melody. See if a counter-melody suggests itself to you that responds to this spontaneous melody. Play the note sequence as stated Play any melody or counter-melody. Add connecting notes between the notes of ...


2

Guessing the time sig. is 4/8, it is written regularly. the 1st bar shown has two lots of four semidemis (7+rest) probably played with l.h., then eight beamed together, played r.h. No problems there. Next bar is 8 semidemis beamed together, then four, but the last 5 are played in the time of 4, so no other way to write it. Bar 3 - they're all triplets, ...


0

I'm going to post my own answer on my question based on what a piano teacher said. He said that since the song goes two times through that the note with the stem up (big crotchet note) gets played first and then after the first ending, play the one with the stem down (smal quaver note). Please share your opinion on this...


1

Previous replies should answer a lot of your questions. The first three notes in your YouTube example are B, D and F. Those are the third, fifth, and seventh notes (chords) of the key of G. He is playing some kind of a G Major scale. It sounds like he plays G Major 7, D7 the V7 and the vii, F minor 7 flat V. It could be played as all 7th chords or other ...


1

Great scene! Well, it happens that those notes fit on some scale. I don't know, let's say, for example, A major. So, this scale is composed of the notes A, B, C#, D, E, F# and G#. This gives you a framework to work with. With those notes, you can play chords and/or melodies. Each scale gives you a framework to improvise with.


0

Correct me if I'm wrong, but it sounds like you are playing chord-based, not notation-based, songs along with modern music ensembles. If this is the case, learn to substitute your left hand for your feet: instead of playing the root of the chord with a foot, you will need to play it as an octave with your left hand in the bass range of the piano. (Play the ...


4

The easiest way to do it is write all the music for the scene before you shoot the movie! But seriously, this is pretty much the way that composing music has always been taught and learned. It's the same technique as learning a foreign language: you start by responding to simple musical ideas that only require a small musical "vocabulary" and "grammar", ...


6

That's exactly it. Most players are better playing block chords with l.h. and the fiddly bits with r.h., so the composer has designated cross hand playing.A good player could play it either way, though. It looks sort of good as well!I reckon that the l.h. is actually playing the 1st and 3rd bass notes with l.h. too. Otherwise the stretch would be a 10th, or ...


-3

It's a grace note. You play the first note quickly before the second without adding time to the length of the bar and then finish out the allotted time for the second note with the second note.


1

Office stationery suppliers sell label sheets in a huge variety of formats, including labels 10mm deep which should be small enough to fit on standard piano keys if you use them "sideways". But even a single sheet would probably label three 88-note keyboards, so you may have to buy far more labels than you actually need. Google for office suppliers - the SE ...


1

Depending on context this may mean a number of different things: it could be a used in a different verse as Tim suggest, but since you state "pokemon theme" I have some doubts, whether any text exists it could be some sort of embellishment (grace note), where the big note indicates the dotted quarter as total duration and the small says, that it is ...


9

More than likely it shows note timing for another verse, where there are different words which need to be sung/played in a slightly different rhythm.There doesn't seem to be a hard and fast rule as to whether the tail on the smaller note follows the main note's tail or goes in the opposite direction, but it makes sense that the value of each note will be ...


0

The characteristics of the piano as a percussive instrument and the singer as an expressive continuous-tone interpreter are different enough that countermelodies don't tend to work convincingly as they don't merge in character and interpretation with the main melody, even when singer and player aren't the same person. It's similar with guitar. With either ...


1

You can play just supporting chords and rhythms. You can support the melody. You can "fill in the gaps" in the melody with melodic figures. You can play a complete counter-melody. The rule is to play sustained notes while the melody moves, be more active when it rests at the end of a phrase. All rules may be broken. You will probably decide to do a ...


1

It's not a question if you should or not (obviously!), since music is free, unrestricted will. As far as i understood, according to your question you might be asking it differently "should i add a counter-melody?" or "is the first melody or counter-melody more effective?" Most important thing is to consider that the counter melody is a "second voice" in ...


0

In two-stave keyboard music, the RH generally plays the upper STAVE, LH the lower. It's quite possible for the music to be all above middle C, thus making treble clef appropriate for both hands. Similarly for music all below middle C and bass clef. The bass clef at the end of the line is a warning that the LH is about to return to bass clef. Though we ...


1

The clef doesn't necessarily mean to tell you which hand to play with. It's there to make the music easy to play, compared with putting the notes on ledger lines. The bottom of the two staves is for your left hand to play. Just read it as if it's the notes you are used to playing with your right hand, except you play those with your left. When it goes back ...


2

Accomplished musician does not always make an accomplished teacher. Pavarotti was a great singer, but I would not have brought my child within a mile radius of him. Domingo on the other hand, he would be a great teacher of children. There is more to a good teacher than just the mere mastery of the subject matter, (That is important though.) to me the ...


6

Don't ask for it. Others have already pointed that the teacher's mechanical abilities have almost nothing to do with his pedagogical abilities. One more point that I would like to add - if you can't play the instrument, can you judge the musicians abilities? I don't know about you, but most people can't. I am a guitar player and can play a bit of keyboards ...


1

If you want to go to one of their concerts that's probably a good idea. Most musicians have a youtube channel or soundcloud or something, so this really shouldn't be that hard. If I were asked by a potential student to play for them so that I could "prove my worth", honestly I'd probably be pretty offended. I would do it, but I would find it to be ...


33

Possibly putting the cat amongst the pigeons here. An expert (at anything, be it sport, art, science, etc.) is often not a good teacher. A good teacher knows the subject, of course, but maybe hasn't the propensity to perform as well as an expert. Often, when someone is naturally good at someyhing, they will lack the empathy to understand why the students ...


3

If it is possible, go to own of his/hers concerts. Most musicians (despite their musical style) play concerts. So, try to find out if the teacher you are interested in is playing a gig any day now and go and watch for yourself. Try to find others students of his, and ask them. This is more important to me, because a good musician doesn't equal a good ...


1

Another possibility (and my preference) would be C7+5. (Or C7#5, as discussed in the comments.) This way we clearly see that the chord is based off of a dominant C7: C E G Bf. It's fairly common to alter dominant chords in various ways, so the +5 just indicates that the chordal fifth of the C7 (G) is raised to G#. You could also have C7b5 which would be C E ...


1

No. It's already shorthand.Nomeclature for chords has been established for a very long time now, and is pretty well universally accepted. The + sign means the 5th of a chord is played one semitone higher than P5. The 7 sign means include the b7 note. As it's written, it could nearly be construed that the 7 part is augmented, but with experience, one would ...


0

I'm not sure there's anything simpler. It's a C augmented with an added seventh in first inversion. C+ is often used of augmented and the 7 is added. However, as augmented chords are not that common, I'd probably write C+m7/E as I'm not sure which seventh is the default for augmented chords and nothing the C+7 indicates an inversion. Had I seen a C+7 in a ...


5

Well, yeah, the first four bars are the easy bit.... < grin >. Just "playing it slower hundreds of times" won't work. Everybody can play this 100% accurately if they go slow enough to take aim at each individual note, one note at a time. Start by playing scales (diatonic and chromatic) in jumps, for example in 10ths C E' D F' E G' etc or 12ths C G' D ...


0

Learning the whole song will be difficult if the song is very long (for example, the Whole entirety 8 minutes of Moonlight Sonata Mvt. 3), but it can help get an idea of how hard the song is. In my opinion, you must divide up the song into sections (similar to how orchestra songs try to have measure markings to practice better). Start with the most difficult ...


1

There are no rules on this sort of thing, it's far too subjective. Why rely on someone else's idea? Why not try out a few of your own. There are not that many options.Usually, thumbs come in far more usefully on white keys, whereas the longer fingers, usually middle and ring work more effectively on the farther away black keys. But that's not a rule, and ...


2

As the question itself admits, there is no "true" mathematical answer to the question since the best tuning varies from piano to piano. But one can use a formula that includes a quadratic term to give some approximation of the Railsback curve. It is therefore probably a closer fit for most pianos than equal temperament would be. Source: Original research. ...


2

I am not pretending that what I will write is the answer (especially since answer is already given and accepted) but I just couldn't hold myself... I am a family man with children, a job, and being 52 years old, considering myself not hopeless in learning the piano and I started half year ago... So in some sense I am in the same boat with you... senseiwa, ...



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