New answers tagged

1

Well, it's not a glissando. That passage mimics in some way the effect of a glissando, but definitely, it's not. One way of percieve it, it's that not all notes are double notes, but there's an alternation between single and double notes, which makes it impossible to play using glissando technique. Now, how is she able to play that passage? Marta Argerich ...


11

You can find examples of both color schemes, and others, throughout history. It all depends on what was popular at the time and what a customer wanted to order. Early on, in Europe, the "natural" keys were made of ebony or ebony veneer, while the "accidental keys" were of plain maple. Later on, it became possible and affordable to import elephant ivory ...


5

These are definitely triplet subdivisions, not duple 32nds. With experience, you can tell the difference even at fast tempos like this. If I was doing this transcription, however, I would take a very different approach. I would either write in swing 8ths, 4/4 at q=206, or I would keep the meter the same and make a note up at the top indicating "swing ...


-2

I have got the same issue some times ago and after obsessively seeking an answer I realized human brain is not able to distinguish between those (in 110 bpm) :D But the common literature uses the 2/3 1/3 split. however it is literally indistinguishable but it is more common to use it. so don't get obsessed over it, you're transcription is absolutely fine. ...


1

For me this isn't terribly difficult. Play the lower staff with the left hand, the upper staff with the right. I use 2 and 4 in each hand since they are more even in length. However, I might change that to take the F# in the left hand with 3. Play right hand over left, not left over right. It's harder to hit the G# in the right hand when reaching ...


0

Remember you don't have to connect everything. Where you lift and breathe (which should make sense with the music) can simplify fingering. Fingering can help articulate. I would play 5-4-3-2-1 and then jump to get the chord with (124). You said that doesn't work with the span of your hand, but I bet it would if you move your wrist properly (to put the hand ...


3

why so many answers say clavichord? this was originally intended for harpischord, where you might (or might not) have had two manuals (keyboards). of course, it can be played on organ, clavichord, and piano, but easily works on one keyboard. It's a bit awkward. You have to plan out the choreography, but it really isn't terribly difficult. One hand plays ...


1

I play those with 5 on most of the upper notes, and a 4 here and there on a black key... thumb on the lower note except when it's a black key then usually 2. Practice them blocked (i.e., as an interval sounded together) then open to play as written.


3

Uh, no, those are two proper treble clefs and there is no reason you should not be playing both parts at the written pitch with both hands. There is no such thing as "too crowded" for polyphonic play. You should be glad that you don't have to interpret two parts in one hand (which often happens with Bach keyboard music): it's much easier to maintain two ...


1

I recently bought a Dolmetsch spinet harpsicord after playing piano my entire life. As I just retired I was going to build a harpsicord but found the spinet. I have found the touch to be very different. Of course, there are no dynamic changes or pedals so there is an interpretive learning curve. However the greater difference is the care the harpsicord ...


0

I can't offer a particular method, but you may find it interesting that Glenn Gould apparently could practice "mentally." I recall him saying this in an interview. Also, this Wikipedia page has some references about it. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glenn_Gould#Gould_the_pianist See the part near "It seems that Gould was able to practice mentally without ...


1

The great pianist Walter Gieseking advocated using visualization techniques. One form of visualization (advocated by the pianist Walter Gieseking) is to study the score of the peice until you know it so well that you could sit down with a blank sheet of manuscript paper and write it out from memory. No simple undertaking! Gieseking even advised doing ...


3

If I'm not mistaken, both of the books have some stuff in common, but the theory is book is focusing solely on theory (duh), whereas the piano book focuses on the piano. The theory book has some stuff about the piano and vice versa, but both have stuff the other book doesn't. I would suggest that if you have the money (they cost around 30-40$ on Amazon), you ...


1

I'm quite certain it's a type of laissez vibrer. I would interpret it to mean that I should leave the whole current chord in the pedal. The placement of the ties is a little odd but comparing to the following lines you see that the same idea repeats. It also explains the missing rests: there should be no silence. The first rest is probably there to make it ...


1

I would hold a slightly different opinion to those already given and say the proper notation is 12 in the time of eight which is played the same as four triplets but still this is 12 in the time of eight. The person that did the transcription probably felt the marking for twelve in the time of 8 would be to hard and left you to scratch you head instead.


1

I do "think" of the notes while playing piano. But I tend to use the scale degree names like tonic, supertonic, mediant, etc. rather than solfege. (Strangely I sometimes sing the solfege names out loud when doing some exercises.) I also think of the letter names like c#, Bb, etc. But there is one other important note identity I think of while playing: the ...


2

There are two different solfeges. Fixed do and movable do. It sounds like you use fixed do, which emanates from do always being C. Movable do supposes that do is the root of the key. Thus, if a song has do,re,mi, in fixed do, the notes are always CDE, whereas in movable do, say in Eb, the notes will be EbFG. This in itself can be confusing for a beginner. ...


1

After fa comes sol, la, and ti or si. Then it starts over again with do and the cycle of the octave repeats in both directions. For a full chromatic scale, see this question. For me I don't have a verbal utterance for playing a note, unless it's part of analyzing the rhythm. But I do think about the note's function in the chord or key. That is: Root Second ...


1

This looks to me like the score was rendered in some piece of software that, due to some layout conflict, has failed to render some of the notes of the piece at all. It also looks like the score is off by an eighth note from proper alignment...this happens sometimes when writing a score in music layout software that treats music as a list of notes. It's ...


12

In support of the other answers here, I have re-notated this passage in your example to emphasize the triplets. This is the exact same passage of music (unless I have made a typo or two) but using extra symbols to make it more explicit. Note that in measure 4 you are required to play "two against three": your right hand is in a duple rhythm while your left ...


19

The eighth notes in the left hand are all triplets. The ones in the right hand are normal. Note how the note heads line up vertically in measure 4. On a purely technical level, this is incorrect notation. But it's something that can be figured out pretty easily, so I guess Liszt either didn't care or wrote it like that for artistic reasons.


23

They are actually eighth note triplets instead of eighth notes. The alternative notation to this would be to group the eighth notes and rests in threes and put a 3 over them like a standard triplet, but it's easy enough to see that you are fitting 12 equally spaced notes in a measure which end up being eighth note triplets which would kind of screw up the ...


2

Those are "laissez-vibrer" ties: you just let the notes ring on. Comparing the top occurence of this construct with the following one makes it likely that the excess ties without proper reference may be a printing error and should instead be attached to the last three notes of the top voice. The next occurences show a second voice with explicitly prolonged ...


2

I'd interpret it as a printing error!. Five (poss.) bars later, there's a note head with no tail. Also it looks like it's in 6/8, but with unusual joining of the 'triplets'. The three 'slurs' are actually referring to only one note there, whereas bar 9 at least has 3 'slurs' for 3 notes. Who's it by and what is it? EDIT : the quaver rest doesn't help much, ...


5

Ordinarily, I'd say this is simply a "laissez vibrer" instruction (playing a chord, releasing your fingers but sustaining it with the pedal). But the unconnected quaver head in the 10th bar is definitely a misprint, so that lowers my confidence in the entire score - the slurs might also be misprints (maybe an entire chord is missing?).


1

Try Schubert's various dances for piano. This is the best source I can think of to answer your question. They are easy enough for sight reading - very numerous so you will have a lot to work through - and they are available for free at IMSLP. (But, the Dover edition isn't too expensive.) Another thing to try is sight read from a hymnal. I know this is not ...


-2

The old adage still applies, perhaps more than ever: you can't polish a turd. The reason why jazz musicians don't play pop songs is that unlike the blues and American Songbook, pop songs do not have well constructed melodies which naturally suggest sophisticated harmonies. Over the past 50 years I have written well over 1000 arrangements. Some of which I ...


3

You can try 60 Top Hat Piano Grooves. It has 60 different grooves in all different styles including Jazz, Latin, pop and rock. You must be a pretty advanced player to play some of the grooves, it is all in music notation and explained using videos, very useful if you know how to read well.


0

The answer to this question was very easy to find. A simple Google search turned up this owners manual for the Baldwin Pianovelle RP2, which was made by GeneralMusic in Italy and branded with the American Baldwin name. By downloading and examining the properties of the PDF file, I learned that the owners manual was created in 1997. So your Baldwin ...


0

You shorten the guitar strings with your fingers. :D physics for the win! But seriously frequency always depends on length and tension.


1

One point has been left out so far. The design of a guitar leaves us no option but to have equal-length strings with different thickness (with the frets used to control the length for all notes except E-A-D-G-B-E for a conventionally tuned guitar). A piano changes both length and thickness: that seems overkill until you realize that there is the issue of ...


0

First to clarify some misconceptions. All strings on a guitar are actually a different length but they look the same. The bridge on the body is angled slightly so technically the strings all have a different length: The main reason why the strings can be around the same length but have different pitches has to do with the thickness of the string. On a ...


24

The best-written summary I could find of this was on Wikipedia. Technical preliminaries (you can skip this if you don't care) All chordophones (musical instruments based on vibrating strings) can be analyzed using the same physics model of a string under tension that is fixed on both ends. The model is slightly simplified and differs from reality in two ...


1

Both length and tension factor into the frequency of a vibrating string, along with the mass of the string. The reasons for the differences arise from how one plays the instruments, and physics. In the case of the guitar, chords are played by using the fingers to push the strings down onto the frets, decreasing the length of the string. This shows that ...


2

The formula is frequency = sqrt(tension/mass per unit length)/(2*length) The factor of 2 comes from the fact that an in-tune fundamental vibration has to travel all the way down the string and back up again in order to be in phase. You can play around with all the parameters. A guitar has 6 strings of about the same tension, but differing thickness. This ...


8

The pitch that a string produces is determined by the frequency of the vibration of the string. In other words how fast is it vibrating. The rate of vibration of a string when it is plucked or struck is dependant on several factors. The tension of the string is only one of the things that will affect the frequency. A string placed under higher tension ...


-1

All strings in the guitar (or other necked string instruments) are different: they have partially different materials (the lower strings tend to be wound with wire) and they certainly have different thickness. They sound best at a particular tension. You usually buy them in sets even though they age differently. Piano strings are very durable and rarely ...


15

String diameter and scale length and tension are all factors, but you are overlooking an entirely different dimension to your question. Frets. A guitar string has a fixed length, but have you noticed the frets? When you stop a string against a fret, you are then temporarily creating a shorter speaking string length. So one string on a guitar can be stopped ...


4

Both length and tension work together to create pitch. Note that the strings on a guitar are all approximately the same length and tension,but the bottom is about 4/5 times the diameter of the top string. On any string instrument, it's important that each string is about the same tension as the others, so that becomes static to a degree. So the two variables ...


0

I use the same fingering for F# as I use for D, or any other arpeggio where all keys except the second note are white. I think that's the fingering you'll find in Hanon; it is the fingering I was taught by my college professors. Now, one of my professors had me learn both the fingering you mention and the one I'm mentioning. His attitude was that the more ...


3

Whilst a lot of scales and their arpeggios have similar fingerings, this doesn't. As in r.h. scale starts with finger 2, whereas r.h. arp. starts with thumb. Any scale or arp. will have recommended fingerings, but I recommend you find your own, based on the practicality of playing. A lot of the fingering is logical, as in don't use thumb on a black key if a ...


1

Firstly, I would be careful with stretching your fingers and hands too much - you don't want to cause any serious damage. Secondly, while the ability to stretch far can be useful, pieces such as the 'Waterfall' Étude (Chopin Op. 10-1) are not about having permanently stretched hand, but rather being able to open and close your hand when necessary. This ...


2

Keep in mind that you're looking for a melodic phrase with that second note, that imitates the melodic phrase in the first note in the earlier passage. So there are some deeper subtleties than just playing all the accented notes equally. You need to keep some form of primary accent on the first note, and a secondary one on the third note, as in any ...


1

The lower staff is usually written in bass clef, but not always. The upper staff is usually written in treble clef, but not always. The reason that the lower staff starts in the treble clef is exactly what Tim says. Whatever works best is whatever clef is used. Also, the lower staff of the two usually is played by the left hand, but not always. Vice ...


2

One's hands are always placed over the notes one is going to play. Otherwise one's fingers won't reach!! So, in this case, both hands are further to the right than usual, as the tune is written higher than normal, shown by two treble clefs. The theory is that it's easier to read than looking at lots of ledger lines. Don't think there's a specific term for ...


6

There is no need to strengthen your R5 for this passage. It's not a question of force, but of control. This is a piano passage, so what you should so is reduce the energy in the three remaining notes. Then the highest note will automatically sound accented. But even if you did have to increase force on the highest note, you wouldn't do it with an isolated ...


4

Generally, the right hand plays the notes on the upper staff and the left hand the notes on the lower. Clefs are usually chosen to reduce the number of ledger lines. This should work well in your example.


3

This looks like a variation of "stride piano", where bass notes are rhythmically alternated with chords some distance away. Idiomatic stride piano is usually pretty technical due to the sheer velocity of playing -- you'd want to look up Fats Waller and Art Tatum as early pioneers of the style,and more recently people like McCoy Tyner and Hiromi Uehara have ...


0

I agree with the spirit of one of the other answers: you need to develop a good "ear" a good sense of pitch and harmony. @Rockin Cowboy's theory approach is extremely valuable. Learn that theory! But, also exercise your ear. Basic chord drills at the keyboard will help. Use a variety of patterns and make drilling in all keys an eventual goal. Try mixing ...


1

I ran over this, and I don't find that using 4 is comfortable on the first chord. I use 5-2 on the first sixth, and 3-1 on the following fifth. Normally, on the second chord, I would finger it 5-2 and 4-1, but in this case I again use 3-1 on the Ab-F, since 3 is already on the F from the previous chord. On the chord chord I use 4-2 and 3-1, again because ...



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