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There is an adjustment called the "let-off" that sets the stop you noticed. Your baby grand was adjusted correctly but the Yamaha full grand probably needs some service. If it is adjusted too far in one direction, the hammer will not let off at all but instead will just push against the string and the piano won't be playable. For this reason, most ...


1

My experience of Yamaha uprights is that they are very good pianos for beginners (and especially young beginners) to learn on, because the touch is light and even and you can get a useful range of dynamics and tone colors without much physical effort. But to give an analogy with driving a small car, the acceleration is very good up to say 40 mph but after ...


1

This type of noise can be hard to track down, because it might not be coming from the piano at all. It could be almost anything in the room resonating at the pitch of the note. If your piano tuner changed the pitch, that's enough reason why the problem only started after the tuning. it's very hard to hear the direction the sound is really coming from, and ...


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I will explain below how to record the audio output from your Privia to your computer. But from the question, it appears that your goal is to produce a video, with a separate, clean audio track to go with the video. To do this, you will want to record both the video and audio - (with all the ambient noise and extraneous sounds you want to eliminate), ...


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At the most basic level, to record the direct output from a digital piano, it'll need a line out jack. You'll need to connect to some kind of audio interface on your computer, and then use a DAW (like Audacity, Garage Band, Reaper or others) to record the sound. For home recording, audio interfaces typically take in XLR or 1/8" plugs and connect to a ...


0

You need to let the piano settle into its new environment before a second tuning. If the first tuning got it into concert pitch, it was already in tune from its last owner (my spinet took two tunings, 6 months apart to get it up to pitch after being neglected for 8 years) If nothing is touching the strings as others have suggested, a miniscule difference in ...


0

Something rattling or resonating. Or just a bad string. It happens. Did you watch the piano tuner at work? Remember how he used felt or rubber wedges to damp two of the three strings of each note so he could concentrate on tuning each one seperately? You could do the same to pin the noise down to one string.


2

There's a possibility of something touching the string; either some foreign body dropped in there & wedged against it, or even part of the mechanism touching the string. I'd recommend visual inspection first. Grab a torch, get the front off & go have a look. Very gently wiping down the length of the string with a lint-free cloth may help - be ...


1

There is so much repertoire that is interesting and playable for someone in your position that it's hard to know where to begin. If it were me, knowing my own preferences, I would start with some of the more manageable J.S. Bach. The two-part inventions are playable for most people, but will require some patience and practice. They are extremely rewarding, ...


0

Weighted action is easier to play as a piano. Unweighted is a great deal lighter to carry to a gig! (I think weighted is worth it!)


3

What I've found is that the acoustic piano is the most expressive when played softly. We all like loud, but anything can be loud and the ear will tune loud OUT after a while. But it pays attention when things get quiet. And that's where weighted keys really help - on a digital too. If you don't have that weight, you'll get a more frequent oops-BANG ...


2

Hammer action is noisier. Of course it is dwarfed by the sounds you hear, but when you have excellent reason for playing through headphones, that reason might also make light action desirable. Also if your main instrument is not a grand piano but a harmonium or accordion or organ, there is no point in an percussive attack, and it may detract from the fine ...


1

Reasons 1 and 2, I think. Bach is popular enough in the West that I don't think that 3 really pertains: I don't think our fundamental wiring is any different. I think your biggest problem may be that Bach's music often comprises both linear polyphony and organised harmony at one and the same time. That gives it an extraordinary... call it "density of ...


6

If you are playing an organ sound, you might want a keyboard that can feel and respond like an organ, rather than a piano It's possible to make a very shallow non-weighted action, which is helpful for some techniques (I like it better for triggering percussive sounds, for example) It's cheaper to make, so instruments are cheaper. The instrument is ...


0

Quality over quantity, but quantity is nonetheless still important. When playing fast pieces especially, one relies a lot on muscle memory, so it's important to imprint the right kind of muscle memory instead of just your default playing-- you want to slow down here, press lightly here, lift ever so slightly here, etc. Slow and deliberate practice that ...


3

Being able to play one grade 4 piece does not mean you will be able to play all of them. The C minor prelude looks and sounds harder than it actually is, in my opinion (as someone who has learned to play the piece). I would say the overall difficulty level between the two is comparable, although as Dr Mayhem commented, the pieces do very different things ...


1

Piano is like math-- before you get to do the fun things like Calculus, you need to learn your basic operations and algebra. Foundation is very important, especially since you seem to be a first-time musician. You also need to build up finger dexterity and strength; sure, you may be able to "read" the music you want to play, but your technique is probably a ...


1

I think our colleagues gave you really good answers and I wanted to add a little bit to them, even if it sounds a little exoteric or too outside the box. All this comes from my personal experience while learning to play the piano. At some point of my journey I understood that the most important thing is the music. The piano is just an instrument through ...


2

On the piano, your "reach" is sorted by pitch. On the guitar, it arranged "functionally" where notes one or several fourths (or third) apart are in close proximity. So the guitar has certain chord voicings and shapes where you can put down your left hand and run a non-trivial picking pattern through the right hand, resulting in a fractured fill-in of the ...


3

I don't mean which instrument they are played on I think the instrument is a big part of it. Pianos can play way more notes at a time. Stomp the hold pedal and you can play a lot more strings than a guitar player can. The piano has a full 88 notes of range. It takes 2 or 3 guitars to cover A0 .. C8. The guitar lets you bend notes, and fiddle with ...


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Just a few ideas: A keyboard instrument provides a lot more freedom in terms of the number of notes that can be sounded together and the distance between them. It's difficult on a guitar to play a fluidly moving bassline and a chord pattern two octaves above; it's trivial on a piano. The sustain mechanism of a piano allows for all notes to sustain at once; ...


1

There are many paths to the mountain, but it the first steps you take can be very important. Keep in mind, there are many different kinds of piano players. I happen to admire Memphis Slim (see my user name.) I also admire any number of classical players. I love Dr. John, as well. These are just three reference points, but to get to any one of them, you ...


7

These groups of multiple notes are called chords. It does in fact mean to play all the notes at the same time. The notes you pictured appear to be notation for piano. The two staffs pictured are the treble and bass staffs. The notes on the lower staff are played with the left hand and the upper staff notes are played with the right hand. And yes, ...


4

You probably don't mean playing more efficiently or effectively. You mean practising more effectively. That has a more rigorous meaning: learning skills faster, without learning anti-skills (bad habits: "practice makes perfect" is not as true as "practice makes permanent"). The number of skills is enormous: steady tempo, accurate leaping to a note, ...


4

One really good way to practice is to play only two or four bars at a time and master them in progression instead of stumbling through the whole song repeatedly. Even though it is much less interesting when practicing, this method gives you opportunity to learn what mistakes you are making and correct them before muscle memory takes place and becomes much ...


4

Assuming that your teacher isn't terrible, she probably isn't giving you 'randoms' - she's probably trying to go through a progression of work that builds up your technique, and she's naturally reluctant for you to jump ahead and learn bad habits. Having said that, there's everything to gain in music by not having just one perspective, so if you are itching ...


2

The text above the staff merely specifies a single chord that should be used by accompanists for this bar. It doesn't change the key of the piece, which determines which accidentals are "understood" to apply to every note without having to repeat them in every bar. A key can be changed only by specifying a new key, i.e. writing a whole bunch of new ...


1

Finding the key when there are sharps: In all cases, look at the last sharp. Find your key at the half tone above it. That is usually very uncomplicated. For the key signature with one sharp, for instance, it is f# you are looking at. Move up a half tone, and you find the tonic note of g. You are in the key of G. However, with your example, the last sharp ...


1

It has indeed got a key change , from C to C#. It could have been written in Db instead, with 5 flats!. But keeping to a 'C-ness' means that the dots stay in the same places, lines,spaces, as they were, assuming the tune stays the same. It's a trick used in a few songs to add some excitement or stop some tedium. If you are struggling with playing in that ...


3

This is called a key change. The 7 sharps simply means that it's changing key from C major to C# major. Treat everything after the key change as if you're playing in C# major. So, when the key is still in C, you'd play no sharps or flats (unless noted by an accidental), and after the key change, if you see a C in the sheet music, you'd play a C#, if you see ...


1

Typically people buy dedicated MIDI controllers because They have more options for transmitting MIDI than a general purpose keyboard with MIDI built in - for example they may be able to do more complicated key splits, send program changes, have a number of controls for transmitting MIDI continuous controllers, and so on. (This is often relevant if you are ...


5

The other answer didn't explain exactly, but in the first case, you're supposed to cross over and play the top note with your left hand. So you roll the LH chord, then continue the roll into the RH, and finally cross over and play the top note with your left hand. The pedal will keep everything sounding. The second example is just a simple one-handed ...


8

The wavy vertical lines to the left of the chords mean "arpeggio": in other words, you are being told to roll the chords. Given that both both passages have Ped indications (the lines and carets under the bass stave in the first excerpt), you aren't obliged to hold the notes with your fingers, so you can indeed cross hands in the first passage. (Edit: To ...


1

Bach does something very similar in his Prelude in C major, though it's five parts across two staffs. You can see that he writes the first note out full length, the second note with a rest, and then tied for the full length, and the remaining notes with rests followed by their individual durations. It's also believed that, in practice, this probably should ...


1

See this question for an example of this using two voicings. Each new voicing should reflect the appropriate amount of rest before it is played. So for your example, the first note played will have no rest preceding it. The second note played will get a quarter rest, and the third note will get a half rest. You should get the idea. Also, if you are ...


1

There are various ways of writing this, some involving tied notes. But basically yes, you need to show a three beat note, a two beat one and a one beat. Maybe simple quarter notes plus a pedal indication would be appropriate. But I agree, it wouldn't be quite the same effect.


5

I usually use this chord as an upper structure of a D13(b9) chord: (D) C Eb F# B Used in that way, it is an altered dominant chord. It could also be the upper structure of an Ab7(#9) chord: (Ab) C Eb Gb B Of course, this is also an altered dominant chord. But it can also function as a chord in its own right, i.e. not only as an upper structure. In that ...


1

There are two separate "layers" of music occurring on the second staff. As you can see, the notes with downward stems already fill the bar, making 3 beats. The rest is part of the upper layer of notes, which begins with one beat of rest and continues with 2 beats on the D.


0

I'm no expert but the obvious answer is so to have the full seven octaves for both A minor and C major. The first key of a piano is an A and the last is a C. The importance of A minor and C major is they are the only two keys made up entirely of white keys. And to be precise, one extra pitch is added to the top of the final octave to complete it. So a ...


2

Classic grand and baby grand is 28-29 inches. Period. Answer made! I measured 30 pianos from eight manufacturers and nearly all were inside this range. This is without wheel stands or any other such things. This is floor to top of white keys when on the standard legs. I would build your desk for the lower dimension as it is much more comfortable for a ...


1

I have been told changing finger is better because that's what you normally do when playing piano - if they were not the same exact key you would be alternating fingers so that's what you're used to doing. Plus of course you can do it more quickly, which would be a factor in more difficult pieces. As a beginner I find doing this quite hard because if I'm ...


2

I have played and loved playing both a Nord Electro and a Korg SV-1, so I am no detractor of electronic keyboards. However, there is a significant difference, in my view, when playing an acoustic piano - or at least a certain sort of acoustic piano. The sort I mean has two features: acceptable key and pedal action, and pleasing tone. There are many new and ...


1

All of the sound energy in a piano comes from your fingers. That requires a certain finger strength and will also provide a lot of opportunity for poignant play and constent articulation that is much less prevalent with typical keyboards, both regarding the keyboard action itself as well as the typical music's tendency to exploit it. A hybrid form would be ...


1

In many cases they are the same and in fact I would consider the differences between them to be similar to the differences between an electric and acrostic guitar. The two biggest difference is that keyboards tend to be unweigthed (although keyboards with weighted keys do exist) where in a piano they are always weighted and piano tends to make more use of ...


3

You must not have heard of the Bösendorfer Imperial 290 piano, which has 9 extra notes lower than "A", for a total of 97 keys. The soundboard is 2.9 meters in length. It is a popular model in large churches and concert halls, but it is very expensive at around €150.000. It has been on the market for more than 100 years. The Bösendorfer company is in Vienna, ...


3

"Just for fun or getting feedback" -- don't attempt to mic the vocal and the piano separately. Mic the room. This is the only easy way to get a natural sounding recording. If you close-mic any instrument, you'll get a recording without any of the natural effects added by the room, and you'd have to compensate with artificial reverb, EQ and so forth. Studio ...


-1

the phase cancellation / comb filtering from using multiple mics is not worth the effort or the cost or the time if you are doing this just for fun. Not getting into it here but in short the combination of complex waves from the same source at two different points in time (distance and time are related) (the speed of sound 1 foot = 1 millisecond) when the ...


0

Because a G# down there is below the range of human hearing. You will only hear overtones and not the fundamental bass note. In my experience, only rarely do I hear the fundamental bass note of the first few keys of the piano. Possible explanations are: The room is not large enough for the wave to develop The piano itself is not large enough to ...


0

Practice makes permanent - my highschool band director. Play it slow and purposeful. Take it from someone who always wanted to play it fast. The brain seems to have two approaches to getting good at something. One approach is to become "passably good," and the other is to become "the best you can be." As you spend more time in music, you'll find that ...


0

I read once that "running downhill" prepares your body and mind for what it will be like to (eventually) run quickly. I was a firm believer in "play slow and correctly, gradually speed up"... well I still am. HOWEVER I did not make the jump to playing lighting fast until I FORCED myself to. I joined a thrash/tech/grind metal band and at first I objected ...



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