New answers tagged

2

The sustain pedal can also be used (on a real piano) for a muting effect. You strike a chord, release the keys, and a split second after you release the keys you depress the sustain pedal. If done well, this produces a sforzando effect: the chord is initially loud but then echos on quietly. Takes practice.


1

On a normal piano, the left pedal is pressed to make the sound quieter. It does this by moving the whole hammer mechanism closer to the strings on most uprights, and often by moving the mechanism to one side on grands. thus it's less distance for the strike to take place. On some pianos, there is a practice pedal, often the middle of three, which brings a ...


11

May I suggest that it is not an 'x' per se, but actually two lines clarifying the voice leading for the top voices. Such lines are found in the first two bars as well.


6

The first obvious (and therefore not really helpful ha) suggestion: Experiment. If you're having trouble with a section, play around with a couple different ways of doing it, even try things that seem unintuitive or "wrong", you may be surprised by something. But now for the real tips: Think in phrases. First read through the whole piece, and gain an ...


0

My advice, as a player with decades of experience, with respect to visualization of one's instrument is this: Don't! Music is an aural art not a visual art. So auralize your instrument don't visualize it. Learn to associate hand and finger position with the relative pitch. If you take the visualization path on music you will, as countless have before you, ...


0

PrincessMarth, if you are unsure or if you already see your yourself as a diversified musician, perhaps not as profficient at any single instrument but able to fulfill different roles in a band or your personal project, or become mainly a composer, then go with Tekkerue's advice and try both, at least for while until you're more familiar with both ...


0

I have written or drawn a set of key diagrams to suit standard (Spanish) guitars. They will apply to any style guitar with the same tuning . The idea came from wanting to combine (or fuse together) the image of a fretboard with the image of the classical music stave. There are separate diagrams for each Major Key and in practice they cope with any Minor ...


1

I see no reason why you can't play both if you are interested in both. I started playing drums and guitar at the same time at age 15 and now 19 years later I still play both and I have also dabbled in other instruments (like piano) but I consider drums to be my main instrument. Learning piano is widely applicable to other instruments and the visual layout ...


0

No rules, but some models. Look at pieces titled "Sonata" from Mozart and Beethoven. I won't analyse their structure for you - anyone considering writing an extended piece of music is surely quite capable of doing that for themself - but note that a piece of music of any length NEEDS a structure. Use the classic Sonata Form if you will, or use something ...


2

The word "sonata" may refer to different things. In the Baroque period a sonata was just an instrumental piece (like Scarlatti's sonatas). I suppose, though, that the OP may be referring to the term applied to the classical period, in which case it can have two different, although related, meanings: 1) The sonata-allegro form, usually simply abbreviated ...


3

It is more commonly called "forearm rotation" because the forearm is what does the work, not the hand. The basic concept is that instead of doing all the work of playing by raising and lowering your fingers with your hand still, you rotate your forearm "inwards" (so your thumb moves down as your hand rotates) to help play a note with your thumb, and the ...


4

I have a similar background, and in my experience, there simply isn't a good transition or analog from piano to guitar. Whereas a child can learn to identify every B-flat on the piano in an afternoon, it takes weeks or months of practice to know the notes on the fretboard. It's an entirely different system. I would like to suggest a few approaches / ideas I ...


0

I suggest starting with 20 minutes and gradually work yourself up to an hour. I did it step-wise with two 25 minute sessions and gradually adding a minute to the time. You can also consider watching training videos, such as on youtube, in addition to your keyboard time.


2

The are scale shapes. The help to memorize notes on fretboard. The every scale has multiple positions. The most popular are vertical patterns but there are others This is very popular minor pentatonic scale shape diagram It will be never so easy to play them as it was on keyboard but you will get used to it. The most beneficial thing you can do on guitar ...


0

You could put black and white stickers on each fret under each string, but it would ruin the guitar's aesthetics a bit. I would suggest memorising the notes on the low E and A strings up to the 12th fret and their relation to the dot markers. By knowing the notes on the E string, you can know the notes on the D string, the note two frets further along the ...


7

Welcome to the wonderful world of guitar. The guitar is a very versatile and portable instrument that you can enjoy anywhere you like. As you have discovered, fretted (or non fretted) stringed instruments such as guitar, ukulele. mandolin, or even violin, are very different from a keyboard instrument. With a piano, there is only one specific key per ...


1

Usually in upright pianos there is a spring based return mechanism that forces the damper on to the string when the key is depressed. The spring may be rusty or broken in which case only replacing it will solve the problem. Another possible cause, the axis of the damper lever may be partially displaced, giving unsuall resistance. In that case dismounting ...


1

As a temporary (which may turn out to be permanent), you could stick something onto the damper, which seems like it's not pushing against the string/s enough. It will depend whether it's against 1,2 or 3 strings. Something like a small piece of foam that has sticky on one side, as long as it allows the note to play normally. It's admittedly an amateur ...


1

Generally, the pitch is fixed. However, if you are playing music for other instruments, there may be some justification for adjusting pitches. For example, guitar is usually written one octave higher than it is played (when written correctly, an 8 below the clef indicates the shift). However, its bass notes tend to have an "unmuddier" sound than that of ...


5

In that age it is most important, that your child has fun playing the piece, so it will actually like to play it. There is no special value in the "original" version for a child, and pieces come in lots of variants (instrumentation, transposition, arrangement, ...). I would more expect, that after some time having made technical progress the child will be ...


3

Standard sheet music specifies the octaves quite precisely. The lowest line in the treble clef, for example, is E4 (the E in the fourth octave): Ledger lines can also be added above and below the staves to extend their range, and you might sometimes see 8va written above or below certain notes to indicate that they should be played an octave higher or ...


9

If you have the option of an intrinsically easier piece that will teach them the same things, that's definitely a fine choice. However, yes I do believe that you are worrying too much. Playing different styles and arrangements of the same song is something I've always enjoyed doing, and I think it's actually beneficial. Something about the contrast allows ...


1

If all you're given is chords, then you don't really have enough information to go on to answer that question. It's up to you to pick the chord inversions/voicings and decide how high or low to play them, and so on. One simple way to play that Dm, for example, might be to play D4-F4-A5 in the right hand and D3 in the left hand. The C would be C4-E4-G4 ...


1

Yes the bass is generally played with the left hand on the keyboard, when played with 2 hands. I think your question is very general because these rules can always be broken, i.e,. the chords can be played in the right hand and the melody played with the left, but allow me to clarify something. The bass isn't necessesarily dependent on the hand you play it ...


1

After learning the basics of playing the piano, you can do a shortcut since you are basically only interested in playing popular songs. On udemy.com there are several courses on harmony and improvisation. You learn a standard set of harmonies for the left hand which can be played for any melody. It is simple to learn. You might check out the "Learn ...


1

In general, 2000 hours of focused practice will get you to a professional level. The "10000 hours of practice" number comes from an article studying Olympic athletes and thus is reserved for becoming the best musician possible given your innate limitations. As Josh Kaufman has demonstrated, even 20 hours of focused practice on a well-defined goal can ...


3

If you don't mind some dissonance in your sound repertoire, I'd recommend Bartok's Mikrokosmos as your learning tool. It is the only progressive piano method written by a compositional genius. It will introduce you to a huge range of piano textures and sounds. And it gets quite difficult. By the time you are through with Volume 6, you have the technique to ...


1

My personnel suggestion is to Start from a Teacher.It will good to have a teacher for guidance.Later you can do self learning. For self learning lot of resources are available in internet like L&M Piano. http://www.learnandmaster.com/piano/ etc.


3

Starting with the last question, if you can you still become a professional, it's risky and presumptuous to give a definitive answer, but not to let you end on a complete blank I'll give you my opinion. It's highly improbable that you may acquire the technical proficiency required, for example, to become a classical concert pianist, but other than that ...


0

Just play the chords that you can't reach as arpeggios (rolled chords). When you get the piece up to the correct tempo, nobody will notice. For consistency, you might want to roll some of the chords that you can reach, as well as the ones you can't. (The score is here: http://imslp.org/wiki/Special:ImagefromIndex/99876)


3

There is a jazz scale theory, coming mainly from the modal period, with contributions from the jazz theorist George Russell, that approaches improvisation by viewing "every chord as having one or more scales that can be played over it" (www.jazzstandards.com/theory/modal-jazz.htm). Here's a possible chords-scales correspondence (this chart is my attempt at ...


2

See this Wikipedia article on instrument classification. There are many instrument classification systems that have been used at different times and in different situations, so there is not one answer to your question. Here are probably the three most common classifications for the piano: Percussion due to the fact that the strings are struck by hammers. ...


-3

In my opinion this is most of the time a stretching/flexibility problem more than a "I have small hands" problem. I would recommend having a look at this thread's answer here, explains how to practice this. Hope you can practice and stretch those fingers. Good luck.


0

The piano is a string based instrument that produces sound by pressing a key that is attached to a hammer. This hammer hits the string associated with the key. From this point of view the piano is more like a percussion instrument with the capability of tuning. The predecessor of piano is the clavichord which is similar but more simple to the piano. It has ...


2

It's both, and it's neither. Use such classifications only so far as they're useful to you. For instance, a piano strikes its strings, a harpsicord plucks them. So do we classify the harpsicord as closer to a violin, the piano as closer to a drum? And both as very different to each other? Only if it's useful to do so. Is it?


0

Since the strings inside a piano have to be hit by hammers, activated by pressing the keys, it is supposed to be in the percussion family. Other, earlier keyboards also had strings, but some were plucked somewhat like playing guitar, albeit the quills or equivqlent were activated by pressing the keys.So, although it has tunable strings, it's the method used ...


2

The "tuning" argument is irrelevant. Tuned drums are used in many different world musical traditions, as well as in western classical and popular music. Instrument classification is to some extent arbitrary, and many different "systems" have been used in different cultures at different periods of history. In western music, "keyboard instruments" are often ...


0

It is interesting that I had almost exactly the same question as you do, when I started to learn to play the piano as an adult, that is, instead of how to do it I wanted to know how does my brain do it when it comes to two-hands playing. My secret wish was, if I understood this, then I could train my brain, and through that become better at piano. Being an ...


0

It simply means the second time you play the right hand slightly differently, sort of arpeggiated. 'Volta' means time or occasion. 'Ossia' is just an alternative part, to be chosen instead of the original under it. Usually an easier option, but ossia doesn't literally mean easier!


4

The one says "2da volta" means "second repeat". You play the given bars in the second repeat while playing the main variant (of the top staff, presumably) otherwise. The "Ossia" means "Other": optionally, you can play the small variant instead of the main variant below it.


-1

You will have to play "Portato" .Portato is also known as articulated legato (Blood 2012).It is a bowing technique for stringed instruments (Anon. 2001), in which successive notes are gently re-articulated while being joined under a single continuing bow stroke. It achieves a kind of pulsation or undulation, rather than separating the notes. It has been ...


5

Yes. The slur just indicates that the note should touch the preceding note, but it's still played on time and ended according to the staccato dot. Basically, a slur does not change the last note it reaches but only the notes before it.


0

Good answers. Just some clarifications. 1hz at 440 is about 4 cents. Someone mentioned 15 cents. A tuning fork can vary up to 3 cents easily just from moderate temperature differences. Swings due to season changes, in my professional experience (tuning for 16 years) can be up to about 4hz. That's 16 cents at A4. Calibration of tuning software accounts for ...


1

I've never seen a piano a tone sharp. You probably mean D sounds like C. It is not unusual to find an old piano that is tuned under pitch. Often it is done to avoid breaking strings. Sometimes it is the result of the owner not wanting to pay the extra money to tune the piano at concert pitch. Some really old pianos were designed to be tuned at 435hz. ...


0

This would be extremely rare for a new-ish piano just from moving (unless maybe if it got pulled out of the lake and left in the rain and/or dropped down the stairs during the move). Yes, it can probably be fixed and is probably worth fixing. You would need to have a pro look at it and do an assessment.


7

This is an instruction how to play the trills at a) b) and c) [bars 4 and 7 of the Menuet and bar 4 of the Andante]. Check there are small letters that correspond to each trill.


0

I just saw this post ("An Ingenious Way to Learn Piano & Keyboard") and actually was reading about this same topic the other day. I did some searching around and stumbled onto this cool article… I thought it was helpful… check it out…. http://www.dld.bz/topremedyforacne


1

Not only can it be fixed there is actually a whole profession built around fixing it. Piano tuner is a musical profession rich is stature and history. It is a profession that is often promoted among people with visual impairments as their heightened sense of hearing makes them well suited to a profession where you have to listen attentively to the pitches ...


10

I'd honestly expect it to be flat rather than sharp! If the piano has a wooden frame holding the strings, it would be unwise to try to move the tuning much. When you tried it, and it was in tune, maybe it wasn't at concert pitch anyhow. If the frame is cast iron, it shouldn't have gone out by that much - unless it's not been tuned for years, and maybe has ...


0

The only economical instrument is the one you'll keep playing. Anything else is a waste of money. So it's important to find an instrument that you will stay eager to sit down with. If you are having house- or roommates, this can be a huge factor in being reluctant to fool around. So unless that is not an issue (do you know when everybody is away ...



Top 50 recent answers are included