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0

The best thing you can do for yourself at this point, since you already know how to play, is to learn how to reharmonize passages of the songs. Reharmonizing can mean inserting chords, changing the flavor of some of the chords, etc. It's a whole art in itself, but one of the simple effective things is when you're resting on a chord, to identify a second ...


2

If you can stretch a tenth, you can sustain all the notes with your fingers if you really want to. Play the Db in bar 3 with your right hand, etc. Otherwise, just use the sustain pedal (possibly with a half-pedal half way through each bar) and don't fuss too much over it. If the piece as a whole sounds convincing, nobody will care if the notes literally ...


0

I'm a pianist of ten years, and I too have found that my left hand isn't as dexterous. My thought is that maybe you should flip things around once in a while. In other words, instead of always playing the melody with the right hand, try playing with the left hand; and have the right hand be the accompaniment. I'd also recommend looking into some classical ...


-1

have you tried to dismount the mechanism to look at the axes and there felt bushings ? in particular the jack's one ? the felt bushings are the parts of a piano mechanism that get damaged the sooner.


1

Unless you want to imitate Wolfgang Mozart and play the middle part with your nose, there is no possible way to play this as notated (i.e. without noticeable arpeggio). It's simply a really bad error in this piano arrangement.


1

I am a lefty and I always find playing almost all instruments including piano a bit difficult for the exact same reason as your question explains. Generally musical instruments are designed favourably to the right-handed people, because they represent the majority. So I think whether your music is played on the right side of the middle C or not, you are ...


2

There is an open-source project called CLAM. It has an application that automatically analyzes chords: http://clam-project.org/wiki/Chordata_tutorial There are also more advanced applications that are part of the CLAM suite that can do more complex analysis. Here is a demo of chordata:


1

As the melody is usually in the r.h. it is usually played a little louder (more heavily) than the l.h. If there are several notes played in the l.h.,a chord for example, then that will overpower the r.h. notes, as they are drowned out by the l.h. It could be your piano, or possibly you are heavy handed with your l.h. It's all a bit relative, and experience ...


9

This depends very much on the actual piano, and also on the acoustics of the room it is in. Opening the lid of an acoustic piano will reduce the muffling of high notes. There is usually some way to open the top of an upright piano, as well as a grand. Storing music books etc on top of a piano doesn't improve its sound quality! If you were playing a ...


1

One handwaving characteristic of the "root note" is that its frequency is the greatest common divisor of the chord notes. It takes a lot of handwaving since for one thing, with an equal-tempered tuning there is at best an approximate gcd (you have to use some scale with just intontation, and of course the choice of scale influences the result), for another, ...


1

I think a lot depends on the type of music that you want to play. $600 can get you quite a good digital piano especially if you buy second hand, but at this price point the sound will only really be good for more up tempo classical music, rock music, or as accompaniment for pop songs. For these types of music the digital piano is probably preferable. Where ...


0

wow, i am definately shocked at how under-estimated speed-typing is, perhaps most of the commenters are actually just pianists and not speed-typers, if you're a speed typist or really know about it, then you must know that speed-typing gives a great ability to control and coordinate all your ten fingers naturally to the point where it's so fast and yet ...


1

The composer Scriabin designed a colour note organ. I think the pitch values of notes are arbitrary but timbre/texture/shape can have ascribed hues and intensities. eg.. A high flute tone can be silver, a deep piano note black etc. . It's a bit of a blind alley though as surely most music ends up muddy brown!


0

Not sure how much this is a factor: The bass strings are not proportionally longer in length, to the higher pitched strings. In other words, a note that's an octave below another is not twice the length, which I believe has to do with the practicality of being able to make the whole piano not too long, and to not have a string deflect so far that it bumps ...


0

I agree with Max. Listen and listen. I especially appreciated his reference to Shoenberg and Webern. When first introduced to them in college, I almost walked out of the room. Having professor who studied with Varesse (xcuse sp if wrong) certainly helped. It took a while for me to appreciate this 'new' type of music. Ironically, both these composers were ...


0

You can definitely learn by yourself. Note that you will need to have discipline to learn. You will need even more to learn alone. Using someone else words: Piano is a very deep art. The fact that is polyphonic with all the scope of dynamics make it a complex machie to master. People spend a life studying piano. If your goal is to play a couple of simple ...


0

The The Jazz Piano Book by Mark Levine is kind of a reference for jazz standards. I learned starting by open and close positions for major, minor and dominant chords as shown in the book. Then practice playing II-V-I combinations in 5ths (that is pretty much a Jazz standard) alternating between closed-open-closed exercises and open-closed-open exercises. ...


0

I as well disagree with the notion of limiting playing to only the fingers.Its almost analogous to attempting to use your pinky without the ring finger moving. I am not a doctor, however,if one moves the fingers, the muscles, tendons, etc,in the forearm move as well. So many other factors are involved with the keyboard other than purely the fingers. One ...


3

Without knowing all of the dimensions - your height, leg length, arm length, upper to lower body proportion, height of existing chairs, size of books, etc. etc., it's almost impossible to answer sensibly. However, what you use is patently obviously not good! Everyone will sit in a slightly different posture to play. Ideally, the keyboard starting height ...


0

It may just be different metrics. Bach is a master of giving self-sufficient parts to each instrument while maintaining a harmonic framework and keeping much more rules of composing practice than he breaks. Now a self-sufficient part means melodic material, and melodic material is at its heart composed of scales. So what you hear is, indeed, just ...


1

Basically, I think my question is, how do I get that much sustain? Well, you don't really. It depends on the piano, but since it is not a sustained instrument, such as winds or strings, the sound will die away. The only thing you can act on is the timing, which brings me to a point which seems greatly overlooked in the other answers, that is of the ...


1

Let your arms and hands hang down to the left and right of your torso. Note the posture of your relaxed fingers. Now lift your arms and put your fingers in exactly that posture on the keyboard. That is the perfect position of your fingers. As for your arms: the part from your fingers upwards should be horizontal up to your elbows. Never let your body put ...


4

You hold a fermata until it stops crying. Or rather, until you have the attention of the audience and before you lose it again. In a room with reverbation, you stop until the onset of a p will overcome the remaining reverb of an ff. There is a fresh start after a fermata, and you should make it appear like that. With a sustaining instrument like an ...


5

To answer the parts of your question specific to the piano, it's entirely acceptable to allow the sound to die away. Silence is a part of music too, or we wouldn't have rests. One way to get more sustain, though, is to use a concert grand piano. (I'm being a bit facetious, of course--I don't have $50,000+ kicking around and you probably don't either--but ...


5

Fermatas do not have a specific length. You would just hold the note longer than the value for effect typically at the discretion of the performer or conductor based on what kind of effect you want. For this specific piece, the tempo is pretty fast so any piano should be able to sustain it easily and the piece is well known enough that you can listen to ...


0

May this not be counted as a complete answer for I unfortunately do not have enough reputation to comment. A few possibilities: the top staff is for another instrument or vocals (in which case I think it would possibly be smaller); I think the piece might be written for an organ as well.(see Bach's Toccata and Fugue example); as others have stated, the ...


0

Here are some tips for the piano on how to sight-read Avoid looking at your hands while sight-reading. This will help you "memorize" the keyboard, so your eyes can stay on the music and allow you to look ahead in the music Avoid the urge to play the piece at performance tempo right away. Play the piece at half speed or maybe even slower if that is what you ...


0

There are many preconceptions about switching from piano to harpsichord, as many people assume, since the keyboard is similar, that the techniques associated with piano are transferable. It is possible for pianists to thrash out pieces on the harpsichord, but it's a huge mistake to assume that piano playing and harpsichord playing are the same thing. An ...


0

Learn to visualize the keys in your minds eye. This is not as easy as it sounds but if you can keep it up it will help.


0

I would say that at the very core of improv there lies the undercurrent of completion of a melody. Whether the great jazz / blues masters had any formal training in it does not take away from the fact that that is in essence what you are doing when you do improv. If you want to take the easier way to become proficient in completion of a melody I can really ...


4

I believe that the oft-cited analogy with learning a language is quite to the point. You need to learn (i.e., copy) words, phrases, and simple sentences, and after a lot of practice you will be able to form your own sentences and express what you want to convey. You can speed up that process from copying to self-expression by total immersion, i.e. by ...


0

Scales and arpeggios are a pretty good place to start practising on day one. You probably need to "back off" and retrace your steps following the same path that you took first time round, though the second time should be much quicker. You can see the pieces in the current UK graded examinations here: ...


2

Depending on the repertoire you want to play you might consider playing Mozart's fortepiano. It is not always built with pedals; sometimes hand stops or knee levers were used instead -Wikipedia The music written for these instruments tends to differ in the way that the 'pedals' are used, they might be held on for longer passages. If music of this ...


2

I used to sneak into the music school and get kicked out too! Eventually got a digital piano with a hammer action because I wanted to practice without restriction, never quite the same as playing the real thing but can be a good practice tool if you have neighbours. Make sure you play it first before buying, and they can plummet in value after buying so may ...


0

Stop playing and go see a doctor From what I've read, this sounds like Carpal Tunnel. WebMD says: Many things can cause this swelling, including:... Making the same hand movements over and over, especially if the wrist is bent down (your hands lower than your wrists), or making the same wrist movements over and over. And: Carpal tunnel ...


2

If you play a glissando remember to relax your hand. A glissando should not cause any great pain. Even if you were playing in a large concert hall, it should not be the case that you hold your fingers so stiff that you have to make the glissando so loud for the audience. Loosen up and practice a glissando with just one finger even by just using your index ...


4

There are instruments like harpsichord or clavichord that seldom (or even never) had pedals similar to the pedals of the modern piano. And the music for these instruments is often played on a piano now. I suggest to practice without pedals and perfect your skill to replace them by manual action where needed. Pedals just help to control the duration and ...


4

In principle you could use the Italian marking "M.S. solo" meaning literally "Left hand only". But "Solo" might be read with a different meaning (i.e. "this piece is for one player"), even though that would seem to make little sense in your context. I think you would be better using a full sentence in your native language, either in the title or at the start ...


0

bottom staff defaults to left hand unless otherwise notated. as does top to RH.


7

This may not be as "simple" as it first appears, because (apart from the most basic playing technique) the piano pedal action is not just an "on-off switch". You need to control the speed of movement, and not necessarily depress the pedal fully. Also the pedals need quite a lot of force to operate them, which is no problem for normal human feet, but would ...


12

Can't use feet well, but if you could move a knee to one side, it would be a simple lever attachment to the pedal, maybe from your wheelchair. Look at knee levers that pedal steel players use. You only really need the damper pedal - the 'soft' pedal could be added later, but it's not as vital as the sustain.


0

One thing to avoid is music with "aids for beginners" like fingering on every note, or letters for the pitch names. You can fall into the trap of unconsciously "reading the fingering" not "reading the notes". Also, you need to be "really sight-reading" using music that you have never seen before. You can get an endless supply of that for free from a website ...


5

I'm not sure if this is any help, but I would probably approach the problem first by suggesting you swap out an acoustic piano for an electronic keyboard. This allows for other controllers to be used in non-standard ways (usually using the MIDI control standard). You might find that this is quite technical to start on, I'm not sure where you stand with ...


2

As a string player, I found playing in small and large ensembles very helpful for getting more solid with sightreading. Playing with others forces you to keep going even if you missed a little something along the way. And it helps you get in the habit of looking slightly ahead so you aren't too surprised by a sudden key change or whatever. Pianists are at ...


5

There are no tricks. Just a lot of practice with songs at a level that you find easy. Strive to stay in time and just read as well as you can. This is a separate practice in addition to learning new songs/keeping repertoire fresh/improv exercises/etc etc etc. In a year with lots of practice it'll get noticeably easier. Past 2 years (again, with lots ...


2

First of all, it should be noted that the edition you have picked is no paragon of typesetting. All of the notes are there, but... The time signature has been changed from 3/8 to 3/4, with all note values doubled. This is probably to avoid scaring beginners with intimidating-looking notes that look short or fast. The eighth notes are beamed in pairs, ...


1

Theres that big curved line, I think its a slur, right on top from bar 1-4... does that mean I hold the sustain pedal down for that whole bit? That is called a legato phrasing mark. In bar 9 and 10 there is a "1 block" and a "2 block", I googled it and (correct me if I am wrong) but that means when it repeats play the "1" the first time and ...


8

the numbers are indeed fingerings. The circle indicates that the hand position is changing. The long curved lines are not sostenuto pedal markings, they're "legato" markings. Legato means that you play the marked phrase smoothly note into note, without spaces or rests between the notes. You're correct that the numbered measures near the repeat sign are ...


6

Can't think why some numbers are in circles - they refer to fingerings - 1= thumb, r.h. in the treble clef. Yes, it's a phrase rather than a slur, so no pedal as the harmony changes. It is a repeat sign. Play the first part again, and second time around, don't play 'bar 1'. Poco moto is a way to say push it along a bit, rather than just keep a tempo going. ...



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