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20

In short, to give a better treble response (the closer to the bridge, the more trebley the sound). It reduces bass that may ruin the sound, and gives a twangier brighter sound without sounding muddy. Fender were the first ones to introduce it, with the Broadcaster (later Telecaster) and it was such a great idea that it was put on the Stratocaster, and has ...


17

The distance from the pickup to the strings determines - in simple terms - the strength of the magnetic field acting on the strings. Since a standard magnetic pickup (active or passive) is an electromagnetic transducer, the output voltage is generated when a string vibrates in a magnetic field. So far so good, what of the pickup height? The stronger the ...


11

You're not lucky---well, you might be lucky in many other ways :), but just not in this particular way. The noise reduction you experience is intentional. Here's the basic idea: The coils in your pickups "pick up" noise in addition to the vibration of the strings. Everyone's pickups do. When you have two pickups selected at once, the signal you hear is ...


10

It may be worth noting that for the exact same reasons mentioned in Alistair Maxwell's response for why it is angled as it is, there are some players who prefer to angle it the other way, although that is far less common. The closer a pickup is to the bridge the brighter it sounds, and Strat style single coil pickups are naturally bright anyway, so switching ...


10

You certainly can, but I don't think you will get a great return on investment. Doing this well requires special equipment that people like you and me likely don't own or have the funds to purchase. If instead you are referring to wiring your pickups to the miscellaneous controls in the cavity and experimenting with unique switching configurations I ...


10

Time was, Fender Stratocasters used a three-position switch, corresponding to neck, middle and bridge pickups. Granted, single-coil, so just bear with me. Players discovered that, if you put the switch in the right position, you could get the neck-and-middle and bridge-and-middle sounds. Jimi Hendrix is a popularizer of this technique, and it became popular ...


9

I used to pull off the covers on my old humbuckers, but, frankly, I couldn't hear a difference. I would hear a difference when I substituted new magnets. I think it's possible there is a very, very minor change, but in general you're more likely to hear a change rewinding the coils, replacing magnets, adjusting the pole-pieces, or using a more-metalic ...


9

The pickups are "powered" by the movement of the strings. The effects processor amplifies the signal until it's powerful enough to be heard. If you plugged your headphones in directly, there wouldn't be enough signal even when you bang hard on the strings to hear anything through your headphones.


9

You will surely not be able to play a strong single coil in the H-H guitar. You could tap a 4-wire humbucker for a single coil sound, but in my experience the tapped humbucker doesn't sound as "warm" as a separate single coil. I too wanted the best of both worlds and I took the following approach. Keep in mind that there are further differences in the ...


8

IMHO, it's generally not a good idea to buy an acoustic/electric that lists for anything less than $1000. Why? Because no matter how much the guitar costs, some of what you're paying for in an acoustic/electric are the pickups and electronics. In other words, a $500 acoustic guitar is a $500 acoustic guitar, but a $500 acoustic/electric is really a $400 ...


8

It tends to mean it is a higher output pick-up. This would drive your amp/gear "harder" than the non-hot pickup, giving a more dirty/distorted (some would say more modern) tone. Like many things though, it is all relative. My Telecaster has "Hot" pick-ups, so they are more Rock than a traditional Telecaster pick-up, but they still have a lower output than a ...


7

I have read much about the Telecaster, but I still don't know what Leo Fender was thinking. I know that Seth Lover was thinking the same thing, as PAF humbuckers had covers too. It was only into the 70s when you started seeing pickups with their covers removed. Even Strat pickups are covered, albeit with plastic. In part, the nickel cover was to make the ...


6

I know this sounds counter-intuitive, but you might want to turn the treble knob back up a bit. When you play a note, it produces the fundamental pitch you want, but also a lot of overtones that contribute to the tone. You don't hear them consciously; your brain takes it all in and adds them together, perceiving the sum of the fundamental and its overtones ...


6

It's possible the pickup selector switch has a dirty contact for the front-pickup when in the middle position. I have an old Ibanez that does the same thing sometimes when I switch to the neck pickup. I haven't seen what type of switch Epiphone guitars use, but my Les Pauls had an open-back switch, so it was possible to take off the switch cover and ...


6

In short, yes! There are tonal differences between the two. Minis will have more mids and highs than the regular humbucker. This is due to two reasons. The first is the width of the pickup. The small width means that it will pick up a shorter length of the string, which translates to shorter frequency wavelengths (higher frequencies). The other factor ...


5

I have an A/E guitar. A Fender cutaway dreadnought. I'm largely happy with it, but here are some words of wisdom. 1) Dreads and other big guitars are big guitars so they can project in acoustic environments. If you're going to be plugging in, you don't need the big fat guitar. Same thing with heavy strings. If you have something backing you up, no need to ...


5

This is a really subjective question, so you aren't going to get any straight answers--it will all be opinion. What you should do is Google "Telecaster Pickups" and find some sound clips to listen to. It's what I did when I needed some new pickups for my Telecaster. Some decent companies to consider: Loller Guitars: My favorite--I have two sets of ...


5

It could be that the pickups are wired out of phase with each other, so when you have both selected there is a fair amount of cancellation. This tends to present itself as a much tinnier sound, with less middle and bass. Or you have a bad switch - as per @theTinMan's post.


5

I don't know much about violin, but I do know a thing or two about pickups :). Piezoelectric pickups are nothing like a standard electric guitar pickup in that no magnetic field is induced while you are playing--which makes them suitable for applications such as violin and classical guitar where no metal is involved. Due to their construction they have much ...


5

There's one more important thing the answers so far haven't mentioned: a pickup's output signal doesn't follow the string movement simply in a linear fashion, but in a rather complex relation depending on inhomogenity of the magnetic field, coil geometry etc., and the closer you get the more nonlinear. The result is somewhat similar to a gentle but very ...


5

That particular bass has passive electronics. The difference between passive and active electronics is fairly simple. In a passive system, the tone pot works by simply cutting frequencies. Active electronics, by use of a power source(batteries), allow you to also boost frequencies. This gives you greater control over the frequency spectrum coming out of ...


5

This may not help a lot, but here is one person's opinion + facts about magnetic cores: sonicwrench forum Q: What is the difference between Alnico and ceramic magnets? A: Alnico magnets are made of an alloy of Aluminum, Nickel, and Cobalt. Ceramic magnets are made from ferrites (often iron oxides). Magnetically speaking, ceramic magnets produce ...


5

Even with a H-H configuration, you could utilize coil splitting to achieve single coil-ish sounds. While arguably this does not give a "true" single coil sound, if humbucker sounds are mainly used, this can be enough. My impression is that most people aren't using the middle position that much, I think the way forward is to try different pickup ...


5

Because of the way vibrations on a string work, from the fundamental all the way up to the highest harmonics, the closer to the bridge you get, the more the balance skews towards higher harmonics. Conversely a pickup at the 12th fret would be overwhelmed by the fundamental on the open string. From Wikipedia: So what Fender mention is generally correct: ...


4

A piezo pickup is a type of microphone. It picks up the physical vibration of the the instrument and converts it to a voltage. It is usually used on acoustic guitars/instruments. A "common" pickup - generates a signal by disturbing a magnetic field generated, you must have metal strings for this to work. There's a very good page covering pickups on WikiP : ...



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