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Every acoustic instrumentalist needs a means to transfer the vibrations of his/her instrument to electric signal. This can be done with a microphone or a pickup. If you wish to use a microphone, you will need to "close mike." To ensure that no other instruments are "heard" by the microphone, close-miking involves having a microphone be placed in close ...


1

You don't say if you're playing with a band using a house PA or are playing solo so my answer is going to be a little broad, but maybe that's good for the other folks. I'm not going to put any links into this answer because you can google all of these phrases to find what you need. Teh Internetz luvs to sell stuff to musicians. A DI unit, DI box, ...


6

These are purely magnetic pickups. In an mathematically "ideal" electric guitar, the body is completely rigid and doesn't vibrate at all. The only things affecting the vibration of the string are the physical properties of the string itself, how it is picked, and the effect of the magnetic field from the pickup (which is negligibly small). In solid-body ...


4

Put simply: any time the relative position of the pickup to the metal string changes, there's a current induced in the coil. If the guitar body is vibrating, then the pickups are vibrating as well. This can be a complicated situation to solve analytically (i.e. with math :-) ), as, e.g., the vibrating body also induces motion in the bridge, which can couple ...


5

Often when a jack socket comes loose, the owner keeps tightening it from outside. This makes the wire attached to the part of the socket which is either inside the guitar body, or under the scratchplate, to turn round. It will only go so far before it either breaks or shorts or touches another component. Sounds like you need to get at the inside part of that ...


1

I think that you may want to try a piezo pickup even though your comment about "transducers" seems to rule them out. To my knowledge there is no equivalent to guitar pickups for free-reeeds, i.e. some type of pickup that transforms the mechanical motion of the metallic reed into an electrical signal (such a thing would seem to be possible for steel reeds, ...


1

The similarity between "how much noise each string is making" and "how each string interacts with the magnetic field" is greater than your question implies. In an acoustic guitar The vibration of the string transfers through the bridge of the guitar to the sounding board. This saps energy from the string causing its vibration to decay. The sounding board ...


1

You have nearly answered your own question. Except for one thing. the signal coming down the guitar cable is a literal reflection of how each string interacts with the magnetic field[s], not how much noise each string is making. Frequency and volume are the same, but you can't forget velocity. If two strings are tuned to the same frequency but one is ...


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As you mentioned, the signal is a pretty good reflection of how the sound waves are behaving. You can watch videos where people actually connect their guitars to oscilloscopes. However, we know from physics how waves behave. The volume of playing changes the amplitude (or how tall the waves are). The pitch, or which string (or note) you play, changes the ...


1

It's not unheard of to have NO master volume, and instead to have separate volume knobs for each pickup. When your P/U selector is in the middle position, this then allows you to dial in the exact mix that you want. The third knob, then, sounds like it's a master tone for both pickups. The grinding sound when you turn one of the knobs could just be a ...



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