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1

Dont forget that the magnetic attraction of the pickup poles simply being present will affect the string vibration and tend to kill harmonics the more pickups/coils are present. That's why EVH stripped his guitar to just bridge HB.


1

The short answer is that an HSH guitar can be wired to do everything an HH guitar can, but provides the additional option of mixing in the middle single coil. HH guitars are usually wired with a three-way switch (neck, middle, bridge) and either master volume and tone or individual pickup volume and tone. As standard, HSH guitars are usually wired with a ...


9

Time was, Fender Stratocasters used a three-position switch, corresponding to neck, middle and bridge pickups. Granted, single-coil, so just bear with me. Players discovered that, if you put the switch in the right position, you could get the neck-and-middle and bridge-and-middle sounds. Jimi Hendrix is a popularizer of this technique, and it became popular ...


3

If someone doesn't know what they want thier guitar to do, they should always get HSH. I'd certainly say it's the most versatile set up. Given the usual wiring (5 way switch) with switch position 1 being the neck pickup and 5 being the bridge, HSH gives a great deal of tonal variety. For my tastes, position 1 on a clean tone can be a bit too boomy. Even if ...


9

You will surely not be able to play a strong single coil in the H-H guitar. You could tap a 4-wire humbucker for a single coil sound, but in my experience the tapped humbucker doesn't sound as "warm" as a separate single coil. I too wanted the best of both worlds and I took the following approach. Keep in mind that there are further differences in the ...


5

Even with a H-H configuration, you could utilize coil splitting to achieve single coil-ish sounds. While arguably this does not give a "true" single coil sound, if humbucker sounds are mainly used, this can be enough. My impression is that most people aren't using the middle position that much, I think the way forward is to try different pickup ...


2

Practical? Absolutely. Beneficial? I would say so! I recently rewired a Tele of mine, from a three-pickup "Nashville" style to the classic two-pickup, but with some tricks under the hood: A four-way pickup selector switch, offering bridge and neck pickups either individually, combined in parallel (as is standard) or combined in series; and A push-push ...


4

Ceramic magnets do produce a stronger field, but that alone doesn't actually change the sound, it just increases the total output (which, of course, will change the sound if you thereby drive an amp further into distortion). What's more relevant is that Alnico is magnetically "softer" (It has a higher reversible permeability) than ceramics, i.e. it changes ...


4

This may not help a lot, but here is one person's opinion + facts about magnetic cores: sonicwrench forum Q: What is the difference between Alnico and ceramic magnets? A: Alnico magnets are made of an alloy of Aluminum, Nickel, and Cobalt. Ceramic magnets are made from ferrites (often iron oxides). Magnetically speaking, ceramic magnets produce ...



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