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After some experimentation, I think I can give the answer myself: Explanation: What limited my picking speed so far, was a slightly un-ergonomic pick angle. I chose this angle at slow speeds, because it gives me a sound, that is particularly pleasant to me, but at higher speeds it becomes increasingly hard to hold this angle. Stubborn as I am, I then ...


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I alternate between a pick and fingers for various reasons. I'll mainly use my fingers when I'm playing songs which only require the low end strings, however I'll switch to a pick if I need to play songs which require the high strings to be used. Why? Mainly due to the fact that my index finger is significantly shorter than my middle finger (my two plucking ...


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I think it's more psychological than physical actually. Not only need you train your muscles to move fast and get synchronized (which is not really about physical strengths per se, but rather accuracy and precision), but you also need to hear what you play and be able to play (sing) it at the expected speed in your head which most people fail to handle in ...


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kind of. but the main solution to your riff speed lies out side of the gym. the vast majority of speed problems come from inadequate synchronization, excess tension, inefficient movements, and restrictive form. the kind physical strength associated with speed is usually best practiced on the instrument. what you might be experiencing is an increase of ...


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Consider watching "cracking the code" on YouTube ... Ultimately, the problem you're facing is what is known as lack of pick-slanting. You're trying to power through with pure muscle strength. Its more about a technique that will allow you slight graze the string when alternate picking. Anyway, it will take time to adjust to this as it is quite different ...


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Whenever learning a new technique it's best to start with slow and deliberate practice keeping a relaxed hand movement. Shake your hand out sideways and with a flapping motion before you start, and at regular intervals to keep from tensing up. It will feel really strange at first, but after a while you'll get the hang of it and it will actually improve all ...


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You can basically make any finger work. Really depends on what feels good to you and which fingers you primarily use while playing. I go over a few different ways of doing it in this video I did.


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whether or not you should anchor depends on the speed you're aiming for and your musical goals really. for anyone who plans on being a master shredder on the electric will need to be as efficient as possible and as clean as possible. so optimally the only thing touching the guitar near the bridge is your wrist. hears why: Max Speed. anchoring your pinky or ...



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