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1

What works for me is to lightly keep my palm (the bit for palm-muting) just behind the bridge, and anchor the forearm to the guitar. That way, there's a whole hand movement available, which is a little stymied when the pinkie is resting on the guitar. Also, it's easier to move to other strings. Anchoring around a knob means too much stretching if one needs ...


2

Many guitarists, including myself, anchor a pinky onto the pick guard in order to retain accuracy when tremolo picking. Some of the top guitarists, however (I'm including Malmsteen, Vai and others) don't anchor at all, they hold their hand clear of the guitar and use both forearm and wrist, which allows them much faster pick speeds than an anchored hand.


3

There is no single correct way to do tremolo-picking. If you analyze how the greats do it you'll realize that everybody has their own technique. I'd suggest to watch videos of relevant players, and analyze their picking hand technique. From my personal experience as a teacher I know that lifting your palm but anchoring with one or two fingers (around where ...


1

Accident of history. The fingerpick style of banjo playing became the predominant style when Earl Scruggs joined Bill Monroe's Bluegrass Boys in 1945. Before that, the five-string banjo was played "clawhammer" style. The "classic" period and style for the plectrum banjo was dixieland jazz from the 1920s. I see no reason why you couldn't play a 4-string ...


3

Easy strumming was probably the market reason for the creation of the so called plectrum banjo. For strumming you don't need a pick for each finger, and because of the metal strings the most natural choice is a flat pick. And, with a flat pick you can also do soloing or combine melodic lines with selectic pluking of two or more strings (a kind of guitar ...



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