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10

You are right that picks are generally thin, medium, heavy. Some picks are by mm, but it's really just a different measurement of the same thing. Some manufacturers will add super / extra thin or heavy. You do get a different sound with different picks. There is a maximum amount of force you can apply with a pick, given it's thickness. This will affect the ...


9

Yes, you can make do without a pick if that is your preference. Use or non-use of a pick (or plectrum) tends to vary by musical style. Flat picks are not used in classical guitar playing (to my knowledge), nor are they used in fingerstyle playing, for example (although fingerstyle guitar players may use a thumb pick). It is true that picks are commonly ...


8

First, sound is perceived when things bump around in your ear, which is generally caused by air bumping around. Moving your pick through the air therefore causes sound, and striking the strings is amplified by the guitar, creating even more sound. Thus, pick sounds are unavoidable. That said, there are various things you can do to lessen the sound. One ...


7

There is absolutely no rule for this, and it depends entirely on the sound you want. A thicker pick allows for more precision because it does not bend (as much) when you pick a string. This goes very far; Brian May is known for sometimes using coins as guitar pick. A bass pick is also 'wider', with a larger surface than a normal pick. This gives you more ...


5

Anything you use to pluck a guitar/bass string will affect the sound. A thick pick will give a thicker sound than a thin one. Fingers and finger nails will give different sounds again. Really, you need to try it. It certainly won't hurt either instrument, but personally I can't think of a reason for using a pick with bass. Slapping and popping become ...


4

Are there significant differences in the types of plastic used for different types/brands of pick? Yes. If, for example, you compare the material properties of the nylon family to the polyoxymethelene family (Of which delrin (or ‘tortex’) belong) you will see they vary considerably. The main properties that influence how they perform are: Friction ...


4

They definitely produce different sounds. A harder pick will give you a harsher sound, and a softer pick will give you a more mellow sound. It's generally easier to play softly or slowly with a soft pick, because it will bend and allow you to move smoothly across the strings. Likewise a hard pick allows you to play more loudly because less energy will be ...


4

It sounds like you're playing chords by plucking strings one at a time. Unless you're playing arpeggios, that's not the best way to do it: Try strumming them all in a row, in a fluid motion. Keep in mind that some pick noise is inevitable, even desirable. In the studio, I do everything I can to emphasize incidental noises like the pick hitting the strings, ...


3

I guess these are what You are looking for... The JAmKat or the Flip Never tried them myself as I keep the pick under the scratchboard.... Jam Kat Flip! EDIT: I stumbled upon another little device today...


3

Here are two reasons you might want to use a plectrum. Your goal is to make the kinds of sound that a plectrum makes You want to broaden your insight into music, by which I mean you don't want to perform with a plectrum, but you want to incorporate what you learn from practising with one into your finger-picking repertoire. For strumming, the main effect ...


3

There are a few techniques that require the use of a pick (especially ones with "pick" in the name, such as "sweep-picking"!)... Also, there are obviously techniques that don't require the use of a pick, such as fingerstyle and slapping/popping(/whatever it is that Victor Wooten's brother does!). I have found it useful to play with and without a pick. ...


2

Beyond what is said, there's pick angle. I tend to get more of the click when I play with the pick hitting parallel to the string, so I try to hit with a little bit of an angle. Another trick is compression. My Boss CS3 has knobs for attack and sustain, and by turning down the attack, you'll control that picky pop a little. Plus, of course, legato. ...


2

Generally, for lead playing, people use 0.7 - 1mm picks. If the picks flex too much, it's harder to play faster picking runs. If you're an acoustic player who strums a lot, you might go with a light to medium thickness. I personally only ever use heavy picks, around the 1mm mark.


2

You might try going halfway and investigate hybrid picking. You hold the pick between just the thumb and index finger and pluck with the middle and ring fingers. It works for travis-picking like Blackbird, and adds emphasis to the bass in Stairway. When the song changes gear, you've already got the pick ready. There are other pragmatic reasons why you ...


2

When you have a lighter pick, it will bend more against the string before releasing, so the force on the string will be less, and the angle will be more like stroking the string rather than plucking it. The lighter sound comes from a combination of the strings being easier to strum, and the softer sound made when you use a lighter pick. The downside to ...


2

There are sooooo many different picks to choose from and every thickness and size will make a different sound. For me, I play bass and I prefer sharp guitar picks: for some reason these are the most comfortable for me and I like the sound. A bass pick will generally be louder (well, you'll notice when playing acoustically) and have more attack on your ...


2

Whether you use a pick or not really just comes down to personal goals, preferences and tastes. If you want to learn rock, jazz or other genres that mainly use electric guitar, then you would probably want to learn to use a pick. If you want to learn classical or fingerstyle, then you can just use your fingers or a thumbpick. I don't think it would be ...


1

I'm a huge fan of Jazz III's, and I've managed to get them in 4 kinds of plastic. I will give my opinion of these: Red - Nylon The classic Red Jazz III is the warmest sounding of the lot, and has the most friction against the strings. These are my favourite as I feel more in control, and prefer the tone. Some people complain about the grip - I've never had ...


1

I remember trying that out myself. There wasn't so much difference in the sound, but it was kind of harder to play with a bass pick on a guitar. That is mainly because a bass pick is wider (since the bass strings are bigger) and the guitar strings are small. But the simplest thing you can do is to try it out. Picks are almost free, so getting a bass one ...


1

Watch bluegrassers. Watch Lester Flatt. Watch Pete Townshend. Watch Michael Hedges. Watch any flamenco players. If you are near the record for trying to hit the strings hard, without protecting your fingers, you have iron fingers and feel no pain. Many of my favorite players, electric and acoustic, play with their fingers and no pick. Tommy Emmanuel. ...


1

This is not only about thickness of pick. Generally thick, will produce louder more accented sound, softer will be more mellow and easier for strumming across the strings. But this also relation between pick thickness and You strings gauge. Thicker strings need thicker picks to produce decent sound. As mentioned before direction is also important ...


1

This answer has already been comprehensively answered, and I would like to say that, for me at least, it is down to a degree of preference, and the way you want to play will reflect in your preference. I like jangly warm sounds, hence I go for very light picks. May I also note that if you are beginning to play a twelve string, then it is easier (because it ...


1

About 10 years ago I was obsessed with this very same question. There are lots of things to try. Go fingerstyle. Don't be afraid! Give it a go. If your friends give you grief, make 'em watch Crossroads, already! Beyond fingerstyle is the apoyando stroke. Learn the rest stroke, where your fingertip grazes the string before the nail hits it and comes to rest ...



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