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13

I would suggest you take note of the parts you most commonly get wrong, and practice each of those parts as a mini "exercise". Write out the short section separately somewhere, and run through those parts in your practice routine. Once you've got them well practiced, make sure you can incorporate them smoothly into the surrounding sections. Practicing ...


12

I can identify with your situation. I play guitar and sing primarily, and am constantly learning new songs to perform. Some songs are very easy but others take more practice to learn to play proficiently. Invariably, on the songs that are more difficult to learn, the first time I perform it for a live audience, I experience the same thing you are ...


11

I suspect that if you keep making random mistakes with a specific piece and you are not generally out of shape (as in, "I have been playing three hours a month for the past six months") you probably did an half-assed job at learning the piece in the first place. What works for me in these situations is Taking out the metronome, setting it to davvero ...


10

Any tips on how to make it sick, so to speak, when trying to internalize the distance between notes? There are three ways you can easily get those intervals in your head. Sing Singing the intervals will make learning them much more easier and effective. Try this before doing your interval exercises: Pick one interval you are having troubles with. ...


10

There aren't any special intervals you should focus on. All of them are equally important. What you can do is to find songs you know, with melodies you can sing, and see what kind of intervals they use. This way you'll remember what the intervals sound like. Now, no one can really suggest these kind of songs to you. They have to be songs you know and ...


8

It's hard to translate this into definite advice without one-to-one tuition, but I think the key is not to "learn pieces" but "learn to play your instrument". Learning pieces, especially if it involves lots of practice for one particular piece, is like "teaching to the test" in school, rather than teaching the subject. Try keeping a list of your "random" ...


6

I don't think there is a definite answer here. I have been in bands where all the members act as 'leaders' at the same time and at bands where one is the leader. In most bands I know, there is a leader. There are pros and cons in both of them. When everyone in the band is a leader, thus making it a democracy, it is hard and time consuming to decide what ...


4

Almost anything sold as a drum machine today will meet your stated needs. As you know, a metronome just clicks at a regular interval. Sometimes it can use a different click for the first beat of each bar, but any more than that and it's more than a metronome. So let's look at what else you might look for: Presets The least flexible options will just have ...


4

Hah. This may benefit from some context (Genre? Situation? Are you the soloist?). Assuming you'll be playing an instrument in an amplified rock/pop combo: Metronome metronome metronome. Practice separate hands, practice each section separately, each bar at all sorts of crazy tempos. Slow, medium, insanely fast. You never know how caffeinated the drummer ...


4

Generally, it's good to practice everything everywhere. This helps you get to know the instrument you're playing better (this doesn't apply only to guitar) and helps you learn how to transpose the songs. But, if you still cannot play a song in a certain key, there isn't much point in transposing it. It might help if you transposed it into something that had ...


4

If I understand correctly, you have a midi file with N different tracks, and you want to create N sound files out of that where for each sound file, one of the tracks is proportionately louder than all the other tracks. If that's the case, you can do this with python and the fantastic music21 library: from music21 import * ##Load in a MIDI file st = ...


4

Record yourself with a decent quality recording device (although these days even a smartphone mic is of decent quality) playing the piece all the way through. Don't stop for mistakes. When you are finished, sit down with the score and pencil in hand and put any phrase where you hear a mistake in parenthesis. If space is available, indicate the problem with ...


4

What I think you should be able to do is: Play the melody fluently; if you can learn it by heart, even better, but if not don't worry. Play the melody slightly varied. If you listen to the same jazz song by many artists, you'll see that none of them play it the same. Everyone changes it a bit here and there. That's something you'll have to do yourself. ...


3

Slide it, Man! In your "impossible" transition, I'm assuming you are already fingering an open A chord. The 2,3 and 4 fingers are in the same position as the B chord, right? Just two frets down (toward the nut). So, just leave them in position and "slide" them up to fret 4, then as they come into position plop your index finger for the barre. This will ...


3

Conveniently, guitars are set up so major scales can be played using all four fingers on four consecutive frets, to play two octaves. Minor scales can be played similarly, with only one slip down a fret on the 3rd string. All this assumes you start on the bottom string, and work up to the same fret on the top. The obvious (ubiquitous?) scales that work well ...


3

Like with anything else, barre chords take time to play properly. I bet that your 1st finger isn't strong enough to correctly bar the 2nd fret all the way. I suggest figuring out where your limit is (where you can actually play an A shaped barre chord) and try switching to and from it to get use to it. A viable option if you need to play this progression ...


3

A couple of points. You don't have to leave out the bottom string. It can still be barred and played on the 2nd fret. You don't have to use three fingers for the strings 2,3 and 4. Obviously, 3 can be used, but you could make do with 2 or even 1, sort of 'barred' across the 3 strings, bent up so that the 1st string still sounds. B7 would work, although you ...


2

To these excellent suggestions I would add -- every time you practice, don't just rely on the computer app and don't just rely on your singing voice and your ear. Also go to an instrument and play those intervals while you study. Pick any note at random and find the specific interval above and below. Train not only your voice and your ear, but also your ...


2

I always kept my learning fun by playing music I love. You have to damp almost all the time and in almost every playing style so you might as well just practice damping on whatever material you normally work on. If you want to get specific on damping/muting work, find stuff you like that has it. Learning to play a single note phrase while strumming all the ...


2

The disconnect between chest and head voice that you experience is completely normal. It is called the passaggio. To minimize the difference in sound between the two vocal registers, you must gradually make them meet in the middle. Chest For your chest voice, try and raise your overall range in half-step increments. Use any of the standard effective ...


2

Just play it over and over again. There's not much anyone can say here. You can play it until you learn the notes and the positions, thus your hands moving automatically and then see where you make mistakes and focus on those parts.


2

The root of the problem is probably your overall left hand position. The A-shape barre chords need quite a lot of pronation to get the fingers all “in line”. By far the easiest setting to achieve this is a proper classical guitar position, i.e. with the arm reaching towards the guitar neck in almost a right angle from below. Buy a footrest and ...


2

Listen to the recordings of the piece played by professionals. Every time you feel like you plateau at a certain level, it's usually because you've already incorporated all the improvements that you feel are necessary, and you don't know how else to further improve/master the song. But more often than not, actively listening to the song done by ...


2

I'm in a similar predicament, these are the steps I've decided to follow: 1 I can play most individuals sections (excluding more difficult passages) rapidly, but the piece itself falls apart unless played at a slower tempo: I just reached the "learned" stages but am not sufficiently familiar with the piece. There are too many possible mistakes I must ...


2

With most pieces that you practice a lot you can get to a place where you can play it through whilst thinking about your grocery list but as soon your attention snaps back to what you are doing you start to make mistakes or you lose your place and can't remember what comes next. At this point you're relying almost entirely on muscle memory. I have found ...


2

One of my music teachers told us that, before every concert, he always planned to improve his performance in some specific way - to use more expression during a particular phrase, for example. Then, his thinking was focused on making beautiful music and succeeding in that one improvement. He was a very nervous performer, and this worked for him. I ...


2

If you think you are 'already sorted' with classical guitar, you must be a guitar God. Can you seriously pick up a piece by Bach, transpose it to guitar while sight reading and play it perfectly? I have been playing for 13 years and my daily practice looks more or less like this: Warmup with scales (major and harmonic minor modes, plectrum and no plectrum) ...


1

I would like someone to help with a run down of everything they do when they practice, step by step. Uh, that's a bit like saying you are a beginning hiker and you want a run down of everything a hiker does when walking downtown, step by step. The turns are different, the starting position is different, the gait is different, the training state is ...


1

You can sing along with a piano/guitar that is playing the melody. I believe this will be really efficient, because you'll hear the exact melody and you'll see where exactly is your problem, and you can work on it. I believe the piano would be best, as it has really clear overtones that will help you listen to a crystal clear melody.


1

I played piano, harpsichord and organ for a very long time and picked up viola early last year. As this wasn't the first instrument,I progressed very fast throguh the method book I was using (Methode d'Alto, Henri Classens, edition Combre - it is a little old French method book. No cbildren's songs at all, but as there is no explanations on technique, you ...



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