Hot answers tagged

17

Depends on what you mean by "may be able". Different instruments and music styles and instruments and practice material pose different hurdles and motivation for different people. That's not specific to playing music but any skill. The less discipline you have, the more you are dependent on upcoming hurdles and short-time rewards matching your current ...


14

Not knowing what the action is like on your guitar, it's difficult. You need to make the action - the distance between the strings and the fretboard - as low as possible, so the strings don't need pressing far.But not so close that they buzz. Also, you may well be pressing TOO hard, it shouldn't be necessary to squeeze too much, just enough to stop fret ...


9

If you have the drive and dedication to get over the initial awkward and difficult learning curve then I don't see why you can't play any instrument you want. When I first started guitar at the age of 15 I played for probably about 3 weeks or so and then "quit" because I was getting so frustrated and felt like I'd never be able to get it. After about 3 ...


7

The first obvious (and therefore not really helpful ha) suggestion: Experiment. If you're having trouble with a section, play around with a couple different ways of doing it, even try things that seem unintuitive or "wrong", you may be surprised by something. But now for the real tips: Think in phrases. First read through the whole piece, and gain an ...


4

Standard sheet music specifies the octaves quite precisely. The lowest line in the treble clef, for example, is E4 (the E in the fourth octave): Ledger lines can also be added above and below the staves to extend their range, and you might sometimes see 8va written above or below certain notes to indicate that they should be played an octave higher or ...


3

"Can someone tell me how many Hanon excersises I should be doing, and for roughly how long I should be doing the exercises before starting my pieces?" One possible answer to this question is: NONE! It is perfectly possible to make great progress with piano without spending any time at all on Hanon. They are very un-musical, and you might make better ...


3

The three things that are likely to cause you pain at this stage are: string gauge: thick strings will require more pressure to fret them pressing too hard: a common problem when learning is putting far too much pressure on the strings. You only need to touch them to the fret (see people like Ritchie Blackmore using scalloped neck guitars, where the string ...


3

The sustain pedal can also be used (on a real piano) for a muting effect. You strike a chord, release the keys, and a split second after you release the keys you depress the sustain pedal. If done well, this produces a sforzando effect: the chord is initially loud but then echos on quietly. Takes practice.


3

On a normal piano, the left pedal is pressed to make the sound quieter. It does this by moving the whole hammer mechanism closer to the strings on most uprights, and often by moving the mechanism to one side on grands. thus it's less distance for the strike to take place. On some pianos, there is a practice pedal, often the middle of three, which brings a ...


3

Most cities have rehearsal rooms, and most I have used have been very well soundproofed, so you may have just not found a good one. Hunt around - ask other bands where they practice. In city centres, practice rooms I have hired over the last 7 years have been anywhere from £20 for 3 hours to £50 for 4 hours, so not really a high cost. Aside from that, in ...


3

You played piano for a fairly extensive length of time, and reached a fairly high level of playing (Inventions aren't the easiest thing to play), so you would probably jump back into it fairly quickly. The muscle memory from playing never completely disappears, so with consistent (and productive) practice, you could easily reach the skill level you were at, ...


2

Slightly different slant on this - why don't you practice with a metronome yourself - and then when you improve and your colleague asks "How on earth do you do that" you reply "Well actually..." I often practice (trumpet) with a metronome ticking but I imagine the ticks are on the 'and' between beats rather than on the beat, so I mentally have to construct ...


2

It's hard to say for your specific case, but it only took me about six months to get back to where I was when I went back to classical piano, and I didn't have a teacher when I came back to it, and I had a longer break. I think you'll find the skills come back very fast, but not the stamina. So you have to hold back and slowly build up how long you play ...


2

First off, if you are renting where you live, then there's a limit on what you can do that will be effective. The most effective things you can do require modifications and therefore ownership. A little bit of physics: When you play, the piano vibrates the air, the air hits the wall and starts the wall vibrating, some of the energy gets absorbed by the wall ...


2

While most answers bring valuable assessments, I would also add the fact that you need to accomodate with the instrument you want to play. Piano players think their instrument differently than guitarist do, same for drums players. So, added to the fact that you must build up your skill, supposedly try to get a teacher or understanding how instrument works, ...


2

There are two basic hurdles to learning a new instrument - the theory, and the technique. For someone who is competent at one instrument, it shouldn't be hard for them to pick up the theory of playing a different one. However, different instruments have different technique challenges. Piano and guitar are relatively simple - it's just a question of where to ...


1

"I find that doing this takes so, so, so much time and I can barely get onto my pieces during my morning practice." You have the answer there. Exercises should only take up a small part of your practice. In music practice you should be working on Warm up Technique Old material New material Theory etc etc


1

I can understand and relate to your frustration. My mother was an accomplished pianist and taught piano. But when she tried guitar, she gave up quickly. She kept the guitar and so growing up I had access to both instruments. I became enamoured with guitar after starting on piano so I have experience learning both. The good news is that if you really ...


1

Barring physical disability, anyone CAN play any instrument. The easier Bach Inventions are regularly set for Grade 5 examinations, so in 6/7 years, regularly prodded by a teacher but not practicing much, you made rather less than average progress. This indicates a degree of talent, I suppose! Are you taking guitar lessons, or trying to teach yourself?


1

Generally, the pitch is fixed. However, if you are playing music for other instruments, there may be some justification for adjusting pitches. For example, guitar is usually written one octave higher than it is played (when written correctly, an 8 below the clef indicates the shift). However, its bass notes tend to have an "unmuddier" sound than that of ...


1

Of course you can play chords using fingers, pick or in fact anything. The majority of guitarists you will see on TV use a pick for chords. It looks like you are getting hung up on the difference between playing every note simultaneously (eg when you pluck 4 strings at once with your fingers) and playing them almost simultaneously by strumming down across ...


1

You can play chords with a pick, and many players do, however what might be your ideal pick for soloing may not be appropriate for strumming because of it being too hard. You may want to try to find a pick that compromises between the two types of playing, hard enough to let you solo but flexible enough to let you play a strumming pattern. BTW you may want ...


1

My argument for using a metronome- at least occasionally- is this: if you can't play a straight beat, you have no assurance that your "expressive" playing with the rhythm is not just bad technique. You need to have a basis to start from, or it's all just sloppy. Thus, I would say that it's at least worthwhile to use a metronome to check whether you can do ...


1

It's going to depend to a great extent on what type or genre of music is being played. Dance music, of any era, will need to be 'metronomic', as dancers will rely on each beat being in the correct place - otherwise they'll have a tendency to fall over - or stop dancing. It's the same with marching music. However, there is a huge amount of music to be played ...


1

should I read the score without even touching the piano? Definitely. Sports coaches use the term "visualization". If you can't imagine "inside your head" what you are trying to achieve, most likely you won't achieve it. You don't need to be sitting in front of a piano (or a cello) to do the thinking. should I try and play the whole thing even if I ...


1

The following anecdote (heard from an international virtuoso classical pianist a long time ago, but unfortunately I don't remember who said it - possibly Barenboim) answers the question pretty well. As a young student, he was learning Beethoven's first piano sonata, and asked his teacher (also a famous pianist) what he needed to do to play it better. The ...


1

I divide up my music into two categories -- assignment and performance. The assignment pieces are to help me to increase my skills, and once I get to 80-90% proficient, I feel that I have gotten what I need from it. I will see the same patterns in future music, so I don't waste time on polishing my assignment pieces. Performance pieces is a different ...



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