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3

You could have any of a variety of forms of wrist overuse injury. I've been there from music, and I used to work in the sports world where this is endemic. The bottom line is it doesn't matter what specific form you have, carpal tunnel, tendonitis, bursitis, etc, they are all different forms of inflammation from overuse. Your connective tissue grows slower ...


2

I searched out this topic to see if it is indeed a labeled phenomenon. I don't necessarily walk away from the instrument, but from some new, difficult pieces. When I come back to them a week or two later, several of my previous "sticking" places in the music have miraculously worked themselves out. I honestly believe it has something to do with hearing ...


2

There is no way to completely stop making mistakes, just ways to minimize the probability of them happening. Try playing with a metronome, this will make sure your tempo doesn't wander while you play without a background. Play with a metronome without a backing track, then try to find a slow version of the song, and play with that (with and without ...


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Google has been my friend to at least establish that I'm not the only one with this problem :) It isn't so much making the chord, but doing so without compromising either the high E or the Bb. Even professionals tend to either duck the high E in order to get a nice full C7 (including John Williams, yes check it out!), or stretch to the high E and partially ...


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What I would suggest is to study the rhythmic part of the song. Practice the values of the melody rather than the melody as a whole, along with a metronome or some instrument. After you see that you can sing the rhythmic part correctly, sing the melody as a whole, again with a metronome or something. Then try singing it with your band.


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You might want to try something like a "Phrase Trainer" which will use a combination of hardware and software to allow you to record a section of a song and then slow down the speed without altering the pitch so you can more easily hear how the guitar solo fits in with the drums and bass and other elements of the song. A phrase trainer will allow you to ...


1

My primary instrument is piano tho as previous post, this applies to others. I have always been of the opinion that playing 'slow' along with a backing track is an incorrect approach. In fact, this applies to learning a piece with or without a backing track. I've always attempted to practice a piece in the correct tempo, even one measure at a time. Other ...


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Mutes I would recommend using something like this: http://www.bill-lewington.com/saxmute.htm It does soften the sound by about 50% for B flat clarinet. Unfortunately, I don't believe that there is a mute made for an E flat clarinet. Another thing you can do is play your clarinet into your closet so that the clothing drowns out the sound. Earplugs ...


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It worked for Hendrix! Why not, though, learn hammering and pulling left handed - after all, your r.h. should be stronger (as a r.h. person). Then you could try two guitars simultaneously. The job would be more successful, as hinted at by leftaroundabout, to use a standard r.h. guitar.


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I have also played guitar (classical) for 4 years. I practised a lot, especially the last 2 years 4 hours a day, and I was diagnosed with Epicondilitys. I did some exercises and I got much better, I'm about to start using a brace. The most important thing to do is relax while playing, as mentioned earlier. Very wise, but also very difficult if are not ...



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