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6

If I'm not mistaken, you don't count every single note, because they are really fast and it would be really tough. Instead, you break them in groups of two. You count them as you would count 16th notes (semiquavers), but with two beats on each hit: Image source Another video which states the same: 1 e and a, but two ...


5

The answers given so far offer excellent and accurate advice on learning chord changes in general! But I will offer a tip that will help many beginning (and some experienced) guitarist with the specific change from G to C which is what your question is about. I am not sure how you are fingering your G and C chords but there are several different ways to ...


4

While any latency does upset the feedback loop between ears-brain-fingers, you can of course work around this through practice. You could probably become proficient without being able to hear the sounds at all. Sure, it could slow down learning until your brain has come to terms with the latency delay, but as you still have the physical touch feedback from ...


4

I strongly recomend that you go to a specialist doctor. If there is a physical condition, anything you do may worse the situation and perhaps cause irreparable damage. If after doing a thorough examination there is no apparent physiological cause, then you may start to apply possible study and performance techniques to try to overcome your difficulty.


4

I empathise with you. For years, I played like that. Each solo was learned individually. Then it was realised that some players tended to use the same set of notes in a lot of their solos. For instance, pentatonic minor. Once it was realised that the sound of that scale was distinctive, I could recognise the sound of the same set of notes in other solos.So, ...


3

From what you describe, I wonder if what you need to work on isn't singing, but listening. You hear that you go out of tune when you listen to the playback: good! The thing to do now is listen while you sing. Try singing along with the original track, but quietly, not full-voice. Listen more than you sing. Worry only about whether you match what the track ...


3

A few thoughts for you. Learning to play chords on guitar doesn't really fit the mechanics that most people are used to with their hands. Having difficulty with some chords (or chord voicings) after one month is not surprising or uncommon. You could try arpeggiating the chords (playing out each note of the chord individually). This would allow you to ...


2

The question is quite broad, however here are some tips: Familiarize yourself entirely with scales and arpeggios. As boring as it sounds, it is incredibly important to know your way around a piano. Don't just familiarize yourself with major scales, work with natural, harmonic, and melodic minor, and even the blues scales! It is also a good idea to work ...


2

Musicians are small-muscle athletes. We have the same issues with strength, flexibility, endurance and rapidity as other athletes but our issues tend to be with the small muscles, joints and tendons that control our fingers and hands. If we play wind instruments we also have issues with breath control and cardio fitness. And most of us have issues with ...


2

First finger the C chord. Take as much time as you need. Then move your fingers up and away from the fretboard and refinger the chord, trying to get all of your fingers hitting the frets accurately and all at the same time. Start with a short distance and then gradually increase the distance until you can do it with all of your fingers fully extended at ...


1

I don't think one should really get stuck into learning one specific way to switch from one chord to another. I'm self taught and playing for a year now, so my methods may not be the best, but here are my take on this: One thing that I have learned is to not get stuck on one shape to play a chord or a specific way to change between chords. This can cramp ...


1

You sound OK for that style of music, but I can hear what you're saying... it's not "garbage" though without some context... how long have you been singing? How long have you been singing "seriously" ?... keep improving breath and diaphragm ... I've been running and singing at the same time at a park nearby, has improved my singing strength tremendously... ...


1

Listening to the two versions, the original is a LOT faster than yours- not sure whether that's deliberate but one effect is that you have to hold the notes much longer in the slower version, which possibly makes it seem more difficult than it needs to be. Your timing is good, and your voice itself sounds like it has a nice tone. I'm no singing coach but ...


1

Once you get a few tutorials, you may find a lot of related videos, and maybe you also found the ones below. For me these seem to be the most interesting ones: (Poliphonic) overtone singing with Anna-Maria Hefele



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