Hot answers tagged

17

Depends on what you mean by "may be able". Different instruments and music styles and instruments and practice material pose different hurdles and motivation for different people. That's not specific to playing music but any skill. The less discipline you have, the more you are dependent on upcoming hurdles and short-time rewards matching your current ...


14

Not knowing what the action is like on your guitar, it's difficult. You need to make the action - the distance between the strings and the fretboard - as low as possible, so the strings don't need pressing far.But not so close that they buzz. Also, you may well be pressing TOO hard, it shouldn't be necessary to squeeze too much, just enough to stop fret ...


9

If you have the drive and dedication to get over the initial awkward and difficult learning curve then I don't see why you can't play any instrument you want. When I first started guitar at the age of 15 I played for probably about 3 weeks or so and then "quit" because I was getting so frustrated and felt like I'd never be able to get it. After about 3 ...


8

The first obvious (and therefore not really helpful ha) suggestion: Experiment. If you're having trouble with a section, play around with a couple different ways of doing it, even try things that seem unintuitive or "wrong", you may be surprised by something. But now for the real tips: Think in phrases. First read through the whole piece, and gain an ...


3

"Can someone tell me how many Hanon excersises I should be doing, and for roughly how long I should be doing the exercises before starting my pieces?" One possible answer to this question is: NONE! It is perfectly possible to make great progress with piano without spending any time at all on Hanon. They are very un-musical, and you might make better ...


3

Most cities have rehearsal rooms, and most I have used have been very well soundproofed, so you may have just not found a good one. Hunt around - ask other bands where they practice. In city centres, practice rooms I have hired over the last 7 years have been anywhere from £20 for 3 hours to £50 for 4 hours, so not really a high cost. Aside from that, in ...


3

The three things that are likely to cause you pain at this stage are: string gauge: thick strings will require more pressure to fret them pressing too hard: a common problem when learning is putting far too much pressure on the strings. You only need to touch them to the fret (see people like Ritchie Blackmore using scalloped neck guitars, where the string ...


3

The sustain pedal can also be used (on a real piano) for a muting effect. You strike a chord, release the keys, and a split second after you release the keys you depress the sustain pedal. If done well, this produces a sforzando effect: the chord is initially loud but then echos on quietly. Takes practice.


3

On a normal piano, the left pedal is pressed to make the sound quieter. It does this by moving the whole hammer mechanism closer to the strings on most uprights, and often by moving the mechanism to one side on grands. thus it's less distance for the strike to take place. On some pianos, there is a practice pedal, often the middle of three, which brings a ...


3

You played piano for a fairly extensive length of time, and reached a fairly high level of playing (Inventions aren't the easiest thing to play), so you would probably jump back into it fairly quickly. The muscle memory from playing never completely disappears, so with consistent (and productive) practice, you could easily reach the skill level you were at, ...


2

It's hard to say for your specific case, but it only took me about six months to get back to where I was when I went back to classical piano, and I didn't have a teacher when I came back to it, and I had a longer break. I think you'll find the skills come back very fast, but not the stamina. So you have to hold back and slowly build up how long you play ...


2

While most answers bring valuable assessments, I would also add the fact that you need to accomodate with the instrument you want to play. Piano players think their instrument differently than guitarist do, same for drums players. So, added to the fact that you must build up your skill, supposedly try to get a teacher or understanding how instrument works, ...


2

There are two basic hurdles to learning a new instrument - the theory, and the technique. For someone who is competent at one instrument, it shouldn't be hard for them to pick up the theory of playing a different one. However, different instruments have different technique challenges. Piano and guitar are relatively simple - it's just a question of where to ...


2

"I find that doing this takes so, so, so much time and I can barely get onto my pieces during my morning practice." You have the answer there. Exercises should only take up a small part of your practice. In music practice you should be working on Warm up Technique Old material New material Theory etc etc


2

I would suggest you start by looking at the question Using keyboard/MIDI controller to learn piano. My answer: if you want something self contained to play on and produce a sound, get a keyboard or digital piano which has some good sounds built and speakers built in. You can just switch it on and start playing anytime you like. If you want to use just a ...


2

I sound fairly decent but I feel like I’m still missing a clear voice a little and that I’m somewhat flat and lifeless on some recordings.[...]My current routine is 5-min warm-up exercises like scales, humming, and lip roles. Then I practice singing songs that I like that have clear vocals. You are not satisfied with your tone. So you'll work 5 minutes on ...


2

First off, if you are renting where you live, then there's a limit on what you can do that will be effective. The most effective things you can do require modifications and therefore ownership. A little bit of physics: When you play, the piano vibrates the air, the air hits the wall and starts the wall vibrating, some of the energy gets absorbed by the wall ...


1

I can only speak from my personal experience here, as I haven't studied this subject at length in any formal way. I've gone through periods in my life of being in-shape and less-than-in-shape. In general, I notice that it's easier to focus and be alert when I'm in shape. This applies to performing and composing music as well. There is also of course the ...


1

I can understand and relate to your frustration. My mother was an accomplished pianist and taught piano. But when she tried guitar, she gave up quickly. She kept the guitar and so growing up I had access to both instruments. I became enamoured with guitar after starting on piano so I have experience learning both. The good news is that if you really ...


1

Barring physical disability, anyone CAN play any instrument. The easier Bach Inventions are regularly set for Grade 5 examinations, so in 6/7 years, regularly prodded by a teacher but not practicing much, you made rather less than average progress. This indicates a degree of talent, I suppose! Are you taking guitar lessons, or trying to teach yourself?


1

From my own experience (I've been separated from the piano for 5 years), you'll need one or two months to fully recover. That is something which has stayed in your brain and muscles. As Czerny said : "One should never have to relearn (technique, especially, EdN) what he already had". Now, I'd say it's even better to step away, from times to times, and ...


1

Considering your prior level (Inventions, Fur Elise, etc.), prior amount of practice per week (3 hours), amount of time off (4 years), and current age (17?), you should not have any difficulty picking right back up almost within the first month, maybe even 1-2 weeks. Find a good teacher, listen to that teacher, and enjoy. I promise you that what you're doing ...


1

should I read the score without even touching the piano? Definitely. Sports coaches use the term "visualization". If you can't imagine "inside your head" what you are trying to achieve, most likely you won't achieve it. You don't need to be sitting in front of a piano (or a cello) to do the thinking. should I try and play the whole thing even if I ...


1

The following anecdote (heard from an international virtuoso classical pianist a long time ago, but unfortunately I don't remember who said it - possibly Barenboim) answers the question pretty well. As a young student, he was learning Beethoven's first piano sonata, and asked his teacher (also a famous pianist) what he needed to do to play it better. The ...


1

I divide up my music into two categories -- assignment and performance. The assignment pieces are to help me to increase my skills, and once I get to 80-90% proficient, I feel that I have gotten what I need from it. I will see the same patterns in future music, so I don't waste time on polishing my assignment pieces. Performance pieces is a different ...



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