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15

YES! Of course. That's the best thing to do. Every time you can't play a song at its normal bpm / speed (tempo), decrease the speed to a point where you feel comfortable with, and practice it there. After some practice, you'll be able to increase the bpm/ speed and after a while, you'll be able to play it at its normal speed. This is good practice for ...


12

Play it slow but correct and then speed up. Try to play it perfectly, as slow as you need it to be. It's better to be able to play it slowly and well then to play it fast and sloppy. Your friends are right, a metronome can help. First, set it to a speed at which you can comfortably play it. From there on, put it a bit faster each time. The song is at 120 ...


8

It works both ways. Don't forget that to your mate, you're the better player, mentor, teacher. Often, it can make you play in less complex ways, maybe to not intimidate `lesser players.And complex isn't often best. As Mr The Bard says, teaching something will always make sure you learn it better. To play with far better players can be scary, if you let it, ...


7

As humans, we're not naturally inclined to play music in time. Our speech while rhythmic at times is vastly more complicated rhythmically than the majority of music out there. Just check out this article by Steve Vai in which he talks about polyrhythms. He talks about how one of the toughest challenges he has ever faced in music is transcribing speech. ...


7

I think it's a great way to practise. You haven't got time for boredom or tedium to set in. In 10 minutes, as long as the guitar is in tune and you can just get on with it with no interruptions,and you have little tasks to complete in the given time,it's got to work.Longer sessions are hopefully available at some point in the week, but short practices ...


6

I’ve played (as an amateur) in a wind band and in the wind section of an orchestra where we did practice dynamics, attacks, tempo and in general following the director instructions most rehearsals. And, obviously, practicing passages is what most rehearsals are about. Complete with style instruction such as “this is italian music, don’t hold your short ...


5

You asked what we look for in musical collaborators. Playing with musicians who have something to prove is a drag. But it's nice playing with really brilliant people because they don't have to go out of their way to show their brilliance - they just play. Playing with people who aren't brittle is nice too - you can point out an error without them taking it ...


5

Chromatic finger exercises with a metronome will help if your fingers are really weak. This is where you play 4 notes on each string from low (low e) to high (high e), and then back up again to low e. One finger on each fret, and when you have done all 6 strings, you start by moving one note up and do the exercise in the next position. (for example, you ...


4

I am a music major, and I have to say that I have never heard of such a thing. There are works for orchestra with unusual titles (Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra comes to mind), but these pieces aren't studies so much as full performance works. I have many acquaintances who play in symphony orchestras for a living, and I have never once heard of such a ...


4

I am inclined to agree with you that it is best to hang around with musicians that are of equal or greater skill than yourself, however there are benefits to be had from playing with lesser experienced musicians. It is said, that the best way to learn is to teach. Teaching someone melodies and chords further reinforces your knowledge of them and works to ...


4

(This is coming from the perspective of a classical pianist, not a pop/rock guitarist, so bear with me.) This is, as stated in some other answers, the correct, traditional way to practice. In many cases, the only way to gain the muscle-memory necessary to play fast passages is by repeatedly working them out very, very slowly. (Watch a video of, oh, say, Un ...


4

I would suggest schools, but more and more schools are getting rid of their pianos. However, if you find one, ask about seeing the caretaker and going in at holidays (now!) or weekends. Some pubs may provide, and maybe you could play in the background when punters are in. Occasionally rehearsal studios (not cheap) have a real piano.Colleges , especially ...


3

A metronome can do several things. If a piece has a metronome marking, it can give you some idea of a composer's (or often an editor's) idea of how fast it should go. Also, it can give you an idea of whether your tempos through a piece are consistent. Especially when you are beginning to work on a piece, you can find that you are playing easier sections ...


3

Get two pots boiling at the same time: continue to play with your friend; and seek out a new band with more accomplished musicians. There's nothing saying you can't be in two bands at once. I personally feel it's not an "either-or" thing, because there's equal importance to getting along with your bandmates as there is to challenging yourself and growing ...


3

Absolutely. There is no better way known to Man. It has always been the way. Folks these days are very lucky - they have the facility to slow tracks to whatever comfortable speed is needed, without changing the key. That's pretty important. When I was learning, we could slow the record player (remember them !) from 45 to 33, sometimes 16 rpm, but that ...


2

This is certainly the traditional way to practice, but you need to be aware that this method may not lead to the gain of the technique needed to play faster passages. Consider learning to run, for example - you cannot learn to run by just walking faster and faster, running is a fundamentally different technique. To apply to the guitar, consider what would ...


2

Yes, This is exactly how you should be doing it! I have been playing the guitar for over a decade now and took lessons all the way through my middle school and high school years. When ever I was learning a new song, a new scale or a new finger dexterity exercise my tutors would set the metronome at a slow tempo so I could focus on proper finger positioning ...


2

It depends on the time you practice and the time you need for the songs you play. Hard to say without knowing you. General rule of thumb: if you don't see progress in the songs you play or don't remember well enough what you practiced the day before, you need to spend more time for the songs you play, so probably you need to preactice less songs. if you ...


2

Congratulations! You got a great job. Practicing guitar isn't good if you doing that just twice a week or even once a week. It even better if you do that everyday in just 10 minutes. Or you can try something like "gym" do. Something like: Monday is for chords, tuesday is scales, wednesday I'm having fun, thursday is picking. Perhaps, try to remember what ...


2

Two additional points beyond BobRodes's answer For using the metronome as a gauge for progress with specific agility/speed exercises: e.g. taking a given exercise and increasing the metronome rate each day for a period of time. Focusing on listening to the click is a basic step towards being able to listen to other performers when in an ensemble situation. ...


2

In relation to the last part of your question, yes, it's directly related to time sigs.There are metronomes which can be set to 'ping' on beat one, whether the time sig. is 2, 3 4 5 or 6 on the top.So you can hear when each new bar starts. The tempo can also be used as a good guide, in that, say it's 80 b.p.m. - if you wanted, you could set 160 to give a ...


1

When I practice with the metronome I often imagine the ticks are on the off-beats, so if I were counting out loud "one and two and three and four and" then a tick would fall on each "and", rather than on a number. If you don't already do this, you have to try it. The skill in this is that you must mentally construct the unheard on-the-beat tick. With ...


1

schools, churches, nursing homes. that's probably about it. nursing homes have sort of gone to digitals or else you may find their acoustic way out of tune. but it's worth a shot. you'll definitely have an appreciative audience. other than that, pony up the cash and buy one, or make do with your digital. My cp-33 is fine for me, at least. I like to ...


1

No idea on the accuracy or validity of this information, sorry: http://streetpianos.com/london2012 says some are still available. Failing that, these look reasonably priced: http://www.jspianos.com/hire/practice-room-hire - I might use them myself next time I'm working in London, since real pianos kinda scare me.


1

Some songs are very easy to learn and remember, other songs take longer. I usually learn a song's intro for example, just the intro, until I have the intro in fluent memory. If the intro is simple, that doesn't take long, it can be memorised in minutes, but if it's not, it can sometimes take days to master. Then I go back to adding the next phase of the ...


1

From another answer at this SE I got notion of the book The Musicians Way by Gerald Klickstein. While its main audience are university level musicians, there's a lot of stuff that is useful for those of us not playing for a living. He talks about how to practice, methods for remembering songs, how to approach new material etc. I think there will always be a ...


1

according to my personal experience: Be patient , it may take for years to reach your ideal speed . play every day ,seems exaggerating ! it's better to play half an hour a day but every day than to play 7 hours but 4 day per week. if you don't have practice schedule make one as soon as possible. warm up before start practicing, it strengthens your fingers ...



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