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Standard sheet music specifies the octaves quite precisely. The lowest line in the treble clef, for example, is E4 (the E in the fourth octave): Ledger lines can also be added above and below the staves to extend their range, and you might sometimes see 8va written above or below certain notes to indicate that they should be played an octave higher or ...


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Slightly different slant on this - why don't you practice with a metronome yourself - and then when you improve and your colleague asks "How on earth do you do that" you reply "Well actually..." I often practice (trumpet) with a metronome ticking but I imagine the ticks are on the 'and' between beats rather than on the beat, so I mentally have to construct ...


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Generally, the pitch is fixed. However, if you are playing music for other instruments, there may be some justification for adjusting pitches. For example, guitar is usually written one octave higher than it is played (when written correctly, an 8 below the clef indicates the shift). However, its bass notes tend to have an "unmuddier" sound than that of ...


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It's going to depend to a great extent on what type or genre of music is being played. Dance music, of any era, will need to be 'metronomic', as dancers will rely on each beat being in the correct place - otherwise they'll have a tendency to fall over - or stop dancing. It's the same with marching music. However, there is a huge amount of music to be played ...


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Of course you can play chords using fingers, pick or in fact anything. The majority of guitarists you will see on TV use a pick for chords. It looks like you are getting hung up on the difference between playing every note simultaneously (eg when you pluck 4 strings at once with your fingers) and playing them almost simultaneously by strumming down across ...


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You can play chords with a pick, and many players do, however what might be your ideal pick for soloing may not be appropriate for strumming because of it being too hard. You may want to try to find a pick that compromises between the two types of playing, hard enough to let you solo but flexible enough to let you play a strumming pattern. BTW you may want ...


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My argument for using a metronome- at least occasionally- is this: if you can't play a straight beat, you have no assurance that your "expressive" playing with the rhythm is not just bad technique. You need to have a basis to start from, or it's all just sloppy. Thus, I would say that it's at least worthwhile to use a metronome to check whether you can do ...



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