Hot answers tagged

17

Depends on what you mean by "may be able". Different instruments and music styles and instruments and practice material pose different hurdles and motivation for different people. That's not specific to playing music but any skill. The less discipline you have, the more you are dependent on upcoming hurdles and short-time rewards matching your current ...


9

If you have the drive and dedication to get over the initial awkward and difficult learning curve then I don't see why you can't play any instrument you want. When I first started guitar at the age of 15 I played for probably about 3 weeks or so and then "quit" because I was getting so frustrated and felt like I'd never be able to get it. After about 3 ...


3

"Can someone tell me how many Hanon excersises I should be doing, and for roughly how long I should be doing the exercises before starting my pieces?" One possible answer to this question is: NONE! It is perfectly possible to make great progress with piano without spending any time at all on Hanon. They are very un-musical, and you might make better ...


2

While most answers bring valuable assessments, I would also add the fact that you need to accomodate with the instrument you want to play. Piano players think their instrument differently than guitarist do, same for drums players. So, added to the fact that you must build up your skill, supposedly try to get a teacher or understanding how instrument works, ...


2

There are two basic hurdles to learning a new instrument - the theory, and the technique. For someone who is competent at one instrument, it shouldn't be hard for them to pick up the theory of playing a different one. However, different instruments have different technique challenges. Piano and guitar are relatively simple - it's just a question of where to ...


2

First off, if you are renting where you live, then there's a limit on what you can do that will be effective. The most effective things you can do require modifications and therefore ownership. A little bit of physics: When you play, the piano vibrates the air, the air hits the wall and starts the wall vibrating, some of the energy gets absorbed by the wall ...


1

I sound fairly decent but I feel like I’m still missing a clear voice a little and that I’m somewhat flat and lifeless on some recordings.[...]My current routine is 5-min warm-up exercises like scales, humming, and lip roles. Then I practice singing songs that I like that have clear vocals. You are not satisfied with your tone. So you'll work 5 minutes on ...


1

"I find that doing this takes so, so, so much time and I can barely get onto my pieces during my morning practice." You have the answer there. Exercises should only take up a small part of your practice. In music practice you should be working on Warm up Technique Old material New material Theory etc etc


1

I can understand and relate to your frustration. My mother was an accomplished pianist and taught piano. But when she tried guitar, she gave up quickly. She kept the guitar and so growing up I had access to both instruments. I became enamoured with guitar after starting on piano so I have experience learning both. The good news is that if you really ...


1

Barring physical disability, anyone CAN play any instrument. The easier Bach Inventions are regularly set for Grade 5 examinations, so in 6/7 years, regularly prodded by a teacher but not practicing much, you made rather less than average progress. This indicates a degree of talent, I suppose! Are you taking guitar lessons, or trying to teach yourself?



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