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15

If you don't have a metronome, get one. They have phone apps for them now so it is pretty easy to get one. Start with a very slow speed. Once you are able to perform it ten times in a row at that speed, increase the speed by 5 beats per minute. Once you can play it ten times at that speed, increase again. Do this until you reach the speed it is to be ...


15

These are all good points, and the question of appropriateness of practice here is valid. I'm going to share some views here that hopefully yourself and other amateur (that is, non-professional, not lacking in skill) musicians can adopt in their attitude and approach to their instrument. Be Patient. Any musician worth their weight in salt will agree that ...


15

YES! Of course. That's the best thing to do. Every time you can't play a song at its normal bpm / speed (tempo), decrease the speed to a point where you feel comfortable with, and practice it there. After some practice, you'll be able to increase the bpm/ speed and after a while, you'll be able to play it at its normal speed. This is good practice for ...


13

There's an excellent book by Gerald Klickstein called The Musician's Way that is the best treatment of this topic I've come across. Klickstein is a guitarist as well, but the methodology he advocates is applicable to any instrumentalist Keep a practice log Split your practice time among these broad categories: New material Developing material ...


12

All types of practice work well at that level, the key is to not spend too much time on any one thing. Different practice topics are draining in different ways so change between practice types often to maintain concentration, also take regular breaks. e.g. -practicing scales, arpeggios and chords is physically draining but not mentally. -Sight reading is ...


12

Play it slow but correct and then speed up. Try to play it perfectly, as slow as you need it to be. It's better to be able to play it slowly and well then to play it fast and sloppy. Your friends are right, a metronome can help. First, set it to a speed at which you can comfortably play it. From there on, put it a bit faster each time. The song is at 120 ...


11

Definitely. For one thing it's much easier to memorise a piece if you understand the theory behind it. Imagine memorising a seemingly random sequence of letters. Now imagine how much easier it is to memorise a poem, because you know how the letters fit together to make words, the words go together to make lines, the lines have a rhythm, some of the words ...


10

Walking away from something and letting it "marinade" is a learning technique known as incubation. When conscious, incubation occurs in the sub-conscious mind where your brain will continue to essentially run series of diagnostic tests addressing the problem it has been presented with. When sleeping, incubation occurs in the unconscious mind, and some ...


8

Here are some thoughts: I would absolutely avoid using pillows / towels as a practice set for many obvious reasons. Since you have an electronic kit, noise should not be an issue - you can either turn the volume way down, or plug in the kit to headphones and hear yourself that way through analog. You could purchase practice pads to go over your kit drums ...


8

I'm no expert. From what I understand, the idea isn't to make your hand stronger. The idea is to play so relaxed that playing a long time feels like a breeze. So don't work on tempo until you've got the relax thing down. The relax thing will only get burned into place from slow exact careful practice and (many) good night's sleep(s). Practice is the ...


8

Trills are (unfortunately) one of those things that only constant repetition will aid. Your body is not naturally used to the movements required for trills. When you constantly practice them, your brain will eventually pick up on the movements and it will become natural to you. Note, by "constant", I don't mean a two hour crash course session playing ...


8

I explain audiation to my students like this: Audiation is just like transcribing a given external melody or rhythm, only it happens internally. When you compose music, you are constantly audiating - your "inner ear" "hears" something, you write it down, you check it, and if it matches, you move on, if it doesn't, then you modify your understand of what it ...


8

I was taught what @tim said as well as a few other tricks (My teacher also taught children so some of it was presented that way). Legs: When sitting at the piano you want your hips above your knees. This is good for your knees and your hips. Sit (Sitz) Bones: When sitting upright you should be able to feel two bones in your bum pressing against the seat. ...


8

From what I understand, you want to "get it out of the way", because you want to focus on the song writing aspect, but not get too in depth with piano technique intricacies. What most people are trying to tell you is that even learning the basic skills, techniques, patterns takes quite a lot of practice and time, because piano is not by any means a simple ...


8

There are a couple of differences between a metronome and a drum machine. A metronome just keeps a regular beat. Some electronic metronomes give a slightly different click to indicate the start of a bar, but that's all. Drum patterns have lots more elements that help keep you in time -- for a typical rock pattern, emphasis on the first beat, snares on the ...


8

It works both ways. Don't forget that to your mate, you're the better player, mentor, teacher. Often, it can make you play in less complex ways, maybe to not intimidate `lesser players.And complex isn't often best. As Mr The Bard says, teaching something will always make sure you learn it better. To play with far better players can be scary, if you let it, ...


7

The USB guitar link is for recording your guitar into a computer. Useful, but not relevant to your needs here. To play something like a CD player through a guitar amp, it is sometimes enough to connect the headphone output of the CD player, to the instrument input of the amp. You will need to turn the headphone volume right down, and turn down the ...


7

The biggest mistake that many starting-out (and professional) keyboardists, including pianists, make is sitting at the piano incorrectly which results in playing with tension. Make sure you learn everything you can about correct bench height (generally, your forearms should be parallel with the keybed), sitting in a relaxed manner and relieving all muscle ...


7

To actually play the bass/accompaniment/melody simultaneously is, as you say, a huge leap. A smaller, effective jump is to use what you already know, but swap it around a bit, to play this like Billy does. Each chord will have basically 3 notes. At the moment, you say you're playing the root with the left hand. That's fine, but if you split the chord notes, ...


7

I think it's a great way to practise. You haven't got time for boredom or tedium to set in. In 10 minutes, as long as the guitar is in tune and you can just get on with it with no interruptions,and you have little tasks to complete in the given time,it's got to work.Longer sessions are hopefully available at some point in the week, but short practices ...


7

As humans, we're not naturally inclined to play music in time. Our speech while rhythmic at times is vastly more complicated rhythmically than the majority of music out there. Just check out this article by Steve Vai in which he talks about polyrhythms. He talks about how one of the toughest challenges he has ever faced in music is transcribing speech. ...


6

A person who plays the piano has difficulties in practicing. Like you questioned skill can go down without practice. Piano is a larger piece of musical instrument that is not portable easily. A key board is a solution. In this instance the cost is a deciding factor for him. Taking all these considerations there can only be one solution. Are you in a ...


6

I don't believe there is a good posture. More important is the height of your hands above the keys. This needs to be so that your wrists are comfortable about 3 inches above the keys, so you're not raising the wrists whenever you move your thumbs under your hands, as in playing scales, etc. For this to happen, the forearms ought to be about horizontal, so ...


6

This video has some good advice on shape and how this affects the sound, and also how to shape it. It is from a classic guitar point of view, where it is important to have a broad contact with the string to create a high quality sound. ...


6

You are missing independent coordination between your limbs. Your brain has not yet developed neurological connections that supports such kinesthetic interdependence as it is something that takes time to do - some of us longer than others. In order to develop strict and evenly developed competence with all of your limbs, it therefore stands to reason that ...


6

As has been said so many times - get a good teacher - at least for a while. I believe anyone can learn to play an instrument by themselves - if they live long enough !! A teacher will guide you to a suitable sax, be it soprano, alto tenor or baritone (quite expensive). Watching videos and using tutor books is good, but they won't answer a question you ...


6

This gets no easier when you get older. I'm 48 and still struggle to find time to practise. Here are some things that help me: Take lessons. It is dead embarrassing to turn up for a lesson having not practised the pieces you are working on. That helps spur me on. Sign up for performances. The orchestra I am in has a concert in five days time. I'm worried ...


6

Sounds like you need to address several issues. You're probably squeezing the guitar neck way too tightly using your thumb more as a vice than a guide. Not necessary at all. You may need to change the angle you hold the guitar at- it could be pulled into your body.Let it out so that your fretting arm has fresh air all around it : too many players have the ...


6

Leaving out notes is rare; usually you would arpeggiate. In fact, when this piece was written, it was common to arpeggiate smaller chords, too. Here you can hear Scriabin himself play Op.11 No.13. He arpeggiates the big chords and some of the others. None of them are notated in the score.


6

In general, your technique isn't going to be fundamentally different than if you are alternate picking, and general good picking technique will apply: Keep your right hand and arm relaxed Hold the pick loosely Move your hand in parallel with the strings (i.e. don't scoop) Monitor your pick strokes to ensure that there is no wasted motion Monitor the tone ...



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