Hot answers tagged

18

Depends on what you mean by "may be able". Different instruments and music styles and instruments and practice material pose different hurdles and motivation for different people. That's not specific to playing music but any skill. The less discipline you have, the more you are dependent on upcoming hurdles and short-time rewards matching your current ...


15

Practice it by playing it as slowly as needed to attain as close to 100% accuracy as possible (no perceivable mistakes). Use a metronome. Once you master it at a given slower tempo, speed it up until it becomes a challenge again and practice at the faster tempo until you master it at that tempo. Repeat this process until you can actually achieve 100% ...


15

Not knowing what the action is like on your guitar, it's difficult. You need to make the action - the distance between the strings and the fretboard - as low as possible, so the strings don't need pressing far.But not so close that they buzz. Also, you may well be pressing TOO hard, it shouldn't be necessary to squeeze too much, just enough to stop fret ...


12

Use a music clip. There are two kinds. When I first started playing piano, I was using one of these: You put the clip around the top of the book, which holds it flat. Problem is, it doesn't work well for large books which are too thick to fit the clip, and when you're playing something at the beginning or end of the book the two sides become unbalanced. ...


12

They're a staple of rock, and as bass guitar is often used as a rock instrument, they are seen as one of the basic techniques of bass playing. With many rock rhythms, quarter notes are too slow and make the song feel lethargic, while 16ths are too frantic and hard to play. 8th notes are, for many songs, just the right thing to drive things forward with the ...


11

One think some advanced musicians can do is to listen to the harmony. This will require a bit of advanced ear training, because the chords in Jazz often have many notes and use weird voicings, so a not-so-well trained ear won't be able to pick up the harmony. Ask a bandmate where you are. This might sound bad to you, like you will give off a bad image to ...


10

If you have the drive and dedication to get over the initial awkward and difficult learning curve then I don't see why you can't play any instrument you want. When I first started guitar at the age of 15 I played for probably about 3 weeks or so and then "quit" because I was getting so frustrated and felt like I'd never be able to get it. After about 3 ...


9

These are jazz articulations, and as a french horn player you'll really just have to do your best imitation of what a trumpet player would do. You might want to ask a trumpet player in your ensemble for some advice and demonstration. What I'd suggest for the shake is a VERY rapid lip slur from the written note to about a fifth above. It's written forte, and ...


8

When looking at Jazz Standards as sheet music, do you play them as is or are you supposed to improvise off of them (or just add some flavor)? TL;DR: You never play something as it is in Jazz, unless it is specified to for some reason. That's Jazz. If you listen to two takes of the same song by the same group, it (most likely) will sound totally different. ...


8

The best solution would be to get a teacher so that he can see exactly where the problem is. Unless someone sees up close how you play, it will be difficult to determine why you don't play as good as you want to. The other really obvious thing is to keep practicing. Play the song over and over again. See which parts of the song give you more trouble and ...


8

The first obvious (and therefore not really helpful ha) suggestion: Experiment. If you're having trouble with a section, play around with a couple different ways of doing it, even try things that seem unintuitive or "wrong", you may be surprised by something. But now for the real tips: Think in phrases. First read through the whole piece, and gain an ...


8

It's pretty common to change the clef in piano music. In your case, the right hand has moved in the lower range of the piano, so it wouldn't be easy to read many ledger lines below the staff. That's why the person who wrote this sheet has changed the treble clef to the bass one. You don't change octaves. The low B in the left hand is played in the octave ...


7

My favorite method is to use clothespins to clip the edges of the book to a music stand. If the dimensions of either the book or the stand don't allow that, I use the clothespins to clip a ruler or a similarly sized piece of wood to the front of the book to keep it open. If the book is stapled together and not too thick, bending it backwards a few times ...


7

Counting helps a lot. If the passage is 8 bars long, two counts of 1,2,3,4. 2,2,3,4. 3,2,3,4. 4,2,3,4 will keep you together. In a well written song, it should, to a degree, tell you where you are. You should hear the cadences as they approach, and that ought to put you onto the next line , stanza, sentence, call it what you will. EDIT: just realised I didn'...


7

Apart from the obvious practice for and by yourself; get out and play with as many different musos as possible - different instruments, different genres, different styles, different experiences (beginners to seasoned players), different venues (from small cosy clubs to arenas- if you make the chance). You maybe only play one or two styles, so doing these ...


6

Practice. Also practice, and finally practice some more. For several years, Tom Morello practiced guitar at least eight hours a day, regardless of whether he needed sleep or anything else. Take lessons. And practice the things your teacher shows you. Get into a band - any band, it doesn't have to be a great band. Try to be the best musician in the band. Try ...


6

I've had books re-bound with a spiral binding through a local print shop. The binding is less durable in that it's easier for pages to rip out with this binding, but it allows the pages to stay flat. If you have a lot of books, this may be prohibitively expensive.


5

Just going to paste Dave Grohl's take on this: When I think about kids watching a TV show like American Idol or The Voice, then they think, ‘Oh, OK, that’s how you become a musician, you stand in line for eight f___ng hours with 800 people at a convention center and… then you sing your heart out for someone and then they tell you it’s not f___in’ ...


5

I would like someone to help with a run down of everything they do when they practice, step by step. Start by doing some relaxing exercises, without the instrument. I don't know how it's called, but I really like to let my upper body fall down, like I was trying to touch my feet with my hands. I guess anything really would be great, from yoga to ...


5

It sounds like you actually have quite a bit of "real" skill already. I'm not sure there's such a thing as "fake" skill. Are you sure you might not have a touch of Imposter Syndrome going on? But beyond that, you mention that where you feel that you lack is in being able to translate back and forth between what you see on a page and what you hear in your ...


5

ask their music teacher. that's the music teacher's job - to make sure you practice effectively. you need to find a music teacher you click with, then you should be all set.


5

Think more about what can happen over the course of days rather than one day. Work on something else musical or (perhaps better) go do something completely different like go for a jog or a walk. Something happens when you work hard on something, then go away from it (or sleep) and come back to it. (Maybe work on it a bit before you go to bed, then again ...


5

If you're hitting wrong notes after resting, you are probably hitting wrong notes when you are practicing tired as well, while being less aware of them. If your fingers get sore and tired after two hours of practice every day for several days, then you are likely trying to force a technical goal to happen with extra effort, rather than becoming aware of the ...


5

You have a few options depending on how much you want to spend and how you might use the equipment in the future. The ideal product that was invented for just the scenario you described is the JamHub Bedroom available at many music specialty stores at a price of $299.99 US. It allows up to 5 musicians to plug their instruments into one of the 5 stations ...


4

What I think you should be able to do is: Play the melody fluently; if you can learn it by heart, even better, but if not don't worry. Play the melody slightly varied. If you listen to the same jazz song by many artists, you'll see that none of them play it the same. Everyone changes it a bit here and there. That's something you'll have to do yourself. ...


4

I have seen videos by some amazing and well established drum tutors which state that when practicing a move, make sure your hands are as strong as each other, and you don't play all dexterity in your lead hand. Ghost notes are a good example - said videos recommend you can do it both ways around. Another example was a sticking of RRLRRLRRLRRL on hi-hat (...


4

As dwoz says, you need to practice, practice, practice ... You seem to be a bit pre-occupied with speed, and really, speed is not the most important thing to be worrying about. Musicality is much more important. You might like to concentrate for a while on some slow pieces of music (or songs) - there are some terrific pieces of music which do not depend on ...


4

The "standard" method is: Lay the spine flat on a table and fold each cover down. Fold down 1 or more pages from the front and 1 or more pages from the back. Continue folding from each side until you get to the middle. This way does not break the binding.


4

Generally, the right hand plays the notes on the upper staff and the left hand the notes on the lower. Clefs are usually chosen to reduce the number of ledger lines. This should work well in your example.



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