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21

I write from personal experience -- I now always wear earplugs as an audience member in big gigs. When music is very loud, it impairs your ability to hear detail. Pitch and even rhythm become difficult to discern. At a certain level of loudness, your brain "fills in" the detail. This is why it's a good idea to play demo tapes loud to A&R men, but keep ...


17

Yes. The key signature of Db has a Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, and a Gb. Those notes are flat unless otherwise noted no matter the octave. You can think of the key signature as a general guide to what notes belong to the key you are playing in. For example, in the key of F the key signature has a Bb in it. So it is telling you every B is flat and all other notes are ...


16

YES! Of course. That's the best thing to do. Every time you can't play a song at its normal bpm / speed (tempo), decrease the speed to a point where you feel comfortable with, and practice it there. After some practice, you'll be able to increase the bpm/ speed and after a while, you'll be able to play it at its normal speed. This is good practice for ...


15

These are all good points, and the question of appropriateness of practice here is valid. I'm going to share some views here that hopefully yourself and other amateur (that is, non-professional, not lacking in skill) musicians can adopt in their attitude and approach to their instrument. Be Patient. Any musician worth their weight in salt will agree that ...


14

There's an excellent book by Gerald Klickstein called The Musician's Way that is the best treatment of this topic I've come across. Klickstein is a guitarist as well, but the methodology he advocates is applicable to any instrumentalist Keep a practice log Split your practice time among these broad categories: New material Developing material ...


13

All types of practice work well at that level, the key is to not spend too much time on any one thing. Different practice topics are draining in different ways so change between practice types often to maintain concentration, also take regular breaks. e.g. -practicing scales, arpeggios and chords is physically draining but not mentally. -Sight reading is ...


12

Play it slow but correct and then speed up. Try to play it perfectly, as slow as you need it to be. It's better to be able to play it slowly and well then to play it fast and sloppy. Your friends are right, a metronome can help. First, set it to a speed at which you can comfortably play it. From there on, put it a bit faster each time. The song is at 120 ...


12

The important thing is to feel the pulse of the tempo in your head as you play. Tap your foot if it helps you. When listening to music, tap your foot, clap or drum on your legs, to reinforce that instinct for rhythm. Do, however, bear in mind that when playing unaccompanied, it's not always vital to keep a rigid tempo. Some pieces benefit from expressive ...


11

Definitely. For one thing it's much easier to memorise a piece if you understand the theory behind it. Imagine memorising a seemingly random sequence of letters. Now imagine how much easier it is to memorise a poem, because you know how the letters fit together to make words, the words go together to make lines, the lines have a rhythm, some of the words ...


10

Walking away from something and letting it "marinade" is a learning technique known as incubation. When conscious, incubation occurs in the sub-conscious mind where your brain will continue to essentially run series of diagnostic tests addressing the problem it has been presented with. When sleeping, incubation occurs in the unconscious mind, and some ...


10

How much time should your son spend practicing piano per week? That implies he doesn't particularly love piano yet. Or you wouldn't be able to tear him away from it. Give him a schedule of 30 mins (broken up into a couple well defined tasks) per weekday starting at the same time every day. Have him show off to you when practice time is -over-. Ask if he ...


10

I don't see why you wouldn't be able to achieve all of your goals within a year - they are a perfectly reasonable. 1.5hrs of practice a day is a typical average of many college musicians, but I digress. Let me address your questions directly: Is it possible, within my barriers, to achieve my goals? What would a weekday excercise (1.5 hours) look ...


9

From what I understand, you want to "get it out of the way", because you want to focus on the song writing aspect, but not get too in depth with piano technique intricacies. What most people are trying to tell you is that even learning the basic skills, techniques, patterns takes quite a lot of practice and time, because piano is not by any means a simple ...


9

Leaving out notes is rare; usually you would arpeggiate. In fact, when this piece was written, it was common to arpeggiate smaller chords, too. Here you can hear Scriabin himself play Op.11 No.13. He arpeggiates the big chords and some of the others. None of them are notated in the score.


8

I was taught what @tim said as well as a few other tricks (My teacher also taught children so some of it was presented that way). Legs: When sitting at the piano you want your hips above your knees. This is good for your knees and your hips. Sit (Sitz) Bones: When sitting upright you should be able to feel two bones in your bum pressing against the seat. ...


8

As has been said so many times - get a good teacher - at least for a while. I believe anyone can learn to play an instrument by themselves - if they live long enough !! A teacher will guide you to a suitable sax, be it soprano, alto tenor or baritone (quite expensive). Watching videos and using tutor books is good, but they won't answer a question you ...


8

There are a couple of differences between a metronome and a drum machine. A metronome just keeps a regular beat. Some electronic metronomes give a slightly different click to indicate the start of a bar, but that's all. Drum patterns have lots more elements that help keep you in time -- for a typical rock pattern, emphasis on the first beat, snares on the ...


8

It works both ways. Don't forget that to your mate, you're the better player, mentor, teacher. Often, it can make you play in less complex ways, maybe to not intimidate `lesser players.And complex isn't often best. As Mr The Bard says, teaching something will always make sure you learn it better. To play with far better players can be scary, if you let it, ...


8

As humans, we're not naturally inclined to play music in time. Our speech while rhythmic at times is vastly more complicated rhythmically than the majority of music out there. Just check out this article by Steve Vai in which he talks about polyrhythms. He talks about how one of the toughest challenges he has ever faced in music is transcribing speech. ...


8

Playing live is very different to practicing. You will find you get an adrenaline rush, maybe nervousness, perhaps you will have astonishing vibrato (from your hands shaking - this happened to my at my first couple of gigs). You will feed off the audience's energy and responses. So initially, I would say don't worry about knowing them too well - it will ...


7

The biggest mistake that many starting-out (and professional) keyboardists, including pianists, make is sitting at the piano incorrectly which results in playing with tension. Make sure you learn everything you can about correct bench height (generally, your forearms should be parallel with the keybed), sitting in a relaxed manner and relieving all muscle ...


7

To actually play the bass/accompaniment/melody simultaneously is, as you say, a huge leap. A smaller, effective jump is to use what you already know, but swap it around a bit, to play this like Billy does. Each chord will have basically 3 notes. At the moment, you say you're playing the root with the left hand. That's fine, but if you split the chord notes, ...


7

In general, your technique isn't going to be fundamentally different than if you are alternate picking, and general good picking technique will apply: Keep your right hand and arm relaxed Hold the pick loosely Move your hand in parallel with the strings (i.e. don't scoop) Monitor your pick strokes to ensure that there is no wasted motion Monitor the tone ...


7

the basic fragment is just using hammerons and pulloffs. have your first finger on the 12th fret, 3rd on the 15th and 4th on the 17th. Play the 15 with your 3rd finger, hammeron to 17 with pinkie, pulloff to 15, then pulloff to 12. the way to practice this baby is to get a metronome and slooooooow it down. I assume the rhythm is straight 16th notes but ...


7

I think it's a great way to practise. You haven't got time for boredom or tedium to set in. In 10 minutes, as long as the guitar is in tune and you can just get on with it with no interruptions,and you have little tasks to complete in the given time,it's got to work.Longer sessions are hopefully available at some point in the week, but short practices ...


7

I think that the differences you mentioned have more to do with the size of the groups involved than their preference for classical or rock music. Also, I'm willing to wager that there is as much diversity in terms of goals among members of the same category (rock or classical) as there is between the two. You mentioned orchestral music, but that is only a ...


7

Practice Time: There is no ideal length of time for practising, especially for practising any one technique. However, an hour does seem like quite a long time for a beginner to be playing chords. It is quite normal for the ends of your fingers to become a little sore while playing, as you play more your fingers will become stronger and the skin on your ...


6

I don't believe there is a good posture. More important is the height of your hands above the keys. This needs to be so that your wrists are comfortable about 3 inches above the keys, so you're not raising the wrists whenever you move your thumbs under your hands, as in playing scales, etc. For this to happen, the forearms ought to be about horizontal, so ...


6

You are missing independent coordination between your limbs. Your brain has not yet developed neurological connections that supports such kinesthetic interdependence as it is something that takes time to do - some of us longer than others. In order to develop strict and evenly developed competence with all of your limbs, it therefore stands to reason that ...


6

This video has some good advice on shape and how this affects the sound, and also how to shape it. It is from a classic guitar point of view, where it is important to have a broad contact with the string to create a high quality sound. ...



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