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You can definitely learn by yourself. Note that you will need to have discipline to learn. You will need even more to learn alone. Using someone else words: Piano is a very deep art. The fact that is polyphonic with all the scope of dynamics make it a complex machie to master. People spend a life studying piano. If your goal is to play a couple of simple ...


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To do the job properly, you need a headphone amp., which will have the facility to mix each signal, and also attenuate the sound. Useful if one amp is louder than the other, or the headphones are of different sensitivity. I use a Behringer - small, lots of options, and inexpensive. It will sort out the mis-match you have with the sockets on the amps and the ...


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First of all, it sounds like your Y-splitter is either defective, or something is basically wrong with it. It's also possible that the headphone jack doesn't provide enough juice to drive both headphones, or one of your headphones has a short or something. Now, to your real issue. What you need is a small, basic mixer, that you can plug each separate ...


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This is a great little exercise:


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More likely than not the Y-cable is not for splitting a 6.3mm stereo signal to two 6.3mm stereo outputs. At any rate, it sounds like you want to hear one amp left, another right. When using the normal connectors of your headphone, you'll be making a ground connection with your amplifiers and more likely than not they have independent grounds already. That ...


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I searched out this topic to see if it is indeed a labeled phenomenon. I don't necessarily walk away from the instrument, but from some new, difficult pieces. When I come back to them a week or two later, several of my previous "sticking" places in the music have miraculously worked themselves out. I honestly believe it has something to do with hearing ...


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if you do sing-training an hour everyday from now on, 10 years later, you would be shocked how good you had improved. this is a true story from me. And how much to improve for you has no limit at all. But everyone does have a different start point. Does that answer your question?


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The question is "how to be constantly aware of posture?" (not, "what is a good posture") The answer is that you must change your perception of what part of your body is actually "playing" the guitar. Let me use an analogy of a tennis player: the tennis player can stand flat-footed and "muscle" the volley using just a swat of her wrist and forearm, but ...


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I just remembered something else from my days years ago in the sports world. Apparently most overuse injuries are actually triggered by the combination of the thing in question (piano) with something else. IE the difference between you and someone else who does 1.5 hours but doesn't do.. X... is often the key. It could be something as mundane as your day ...


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If you are at the right standard for ATCL, you shouldn't have any problem with one and a half hours practice a day. Five or six hours a day, maybe, until you build up the stamina to deal with that. But if you are getting continuous wrist pain even when you are not playing YOU ARE DOING SOMETHING SERIOUSLY WRONG, and IF YOU KEEP DOING IT, YOUR PIANO PLAYING ...


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The jazz nod and the blues grimace are things that many players practice for hours in front of a mirror to ACHIEVE...and you want to practice to ELIMINATE them? heh Try singing along. You can't make weird shapes with your lips if you're using them at the same time as you're playing.


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The answer is that you don't actually know the part as well as you think you do. When you practice sans backing tracks, you allow yourself to fudge the part. You may be playing all the notes, but you aren't playing them in consistent tempo...i.e. you slow down and speed up according to your ability. Try this: SING THE GUITAR PART along with the backing ...


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As Iain Duncan notes, pain is a sign of injury. Don't take it lightly. There is something about your posture or technique or even your diet that is causing stress and that stress is causing inflammation, and that inflammation (whatever form it may present) is causing pain. You cannot "work through it." DO NOT "work through it." Long term, you need to ...


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You could have any of a variety of forms of wrist overuse injury. I've been there from music, and I used to work in the sports world where this is endemic. The bottom line is it doesn't matter what specific form you have, carpal tunnel, tendonitis, bursitis, etc, they are all different forms of inflammation from overuse. Your connective tissue grows slower ...


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In the exmaple you give, can I assume that the problem is timing? Ie you may play the right notes etc but finish before/ after the point where the next section of solo kicks in ? Other people have mentioned using a metronome to get your timing steady - that's really good advice. If you play with one, and timing is the problem, then at first it'll feel like ...


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You might want to try something like a "Phrase Trainer" which will use a combination of hardware and software to allow you to record a section of a song and then slow down the speed without altering the pitch so you can more easily hear how the guitar solo fits in with the drums and bass and other elements of the song. A phrase trainer will allow you to ...


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My primary instrument is piano tho as previous post, this applies to others. I have always been of the opinion that playing 'slow' along with a backing track is an incorrect approach. In fact, this applies to learning a piece with or without a backing track. I've always attempted to practice a piece in the correct tempo, even one measure at a time. Other ...


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There is no way to completely stop making mistakes, just ways to minimize the probability of them happening. Try playing with a metronome, this will make sure your tempo doesn't wander while you play without a background. Play with a metronome without a backing track, then try to find a slow version of the song, and play with that (with and without ...


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I have also played guitar (classical) for 4 years. I practised a lot, especially the last 2 years 4 hours a day, and I was diagnosed with Epicondilitys. I did some exercises and I got much better, I'm about to start using a brace. The most important thing to do is relax while playing, as mentioned earlier. Very wise, but also very difficult if are not ...


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Mutes I would recommend using something like this: http://www.bill-lewington.com/saxmute.htm It does soften the sound by about 50% for B flat clarinet. Unfortunately, I don't believe that there is a mute made for an E flat clarinet. Another thing you can do is play your clarinet into your closet so that the clothing drowns out the sound. Earplugs ...


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It worked for Hendrix! Why not, though, learn hammering and pulling left handed - after all, your r.h. should be stronger (as a r.h. person). Then you could try two guitars simultaneously. The job would be more successful, as hinted at by leftaroundabout, to use a standard r.h. guitar.


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Well – why not? It can hardly hurt to try unusual new stuff. But frankly if you just learn to play left-handed guitar left-handed, as well as the same stuff right-handed on right-handed guitar, I don't see the point either. This “can play anything with either hand” boasting is, well... IMO it's ridiculous. What would be rather more interesting ...


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Google has been my friend to at least establish that I'm not the only one with this problem :) It isn't so much making the chord, but doing so without compromising either the high E or the Bb. Even professionals tend to either duck the high E in order to get a nice full C7 (including John Williams, yes check it out!), or stretch to the high E and partially ...



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