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Get a hold of "George Van Eps Guitar Method" - buy it, find it on the interweb thing, check out triad exercises on ewetube. It is the ultimate foundation guide for triads that will open up the fretboard and unlock your hidden potential, the enabler to show music aficionados why you are on this planet.


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I use a Boss Micro-BR for doing this kind of practice. (At the moment, I just select a random page from a Real Book, record the chords, and then use this backing to sight-read the melody over and practise some improvisation.) The recording quality of the Micro-BR isn't that amazing, but the functionality is. Off the top of my head: 4 track multi-track ...


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The Boss RC-30 is a very good looper that has an XLR input for a microphone and stereo/mono input for when you get your electro-acoustic. It is a dual track looper, with some effects, 99 memory slots, up to 3 hours recording. You can also connect this to your computer and save/load your loops. For putting down a phrase and then playing over it etc, I would ...


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I realize some people will probably not like this answer, but I am going to say it anyway: I am a very strong believer in simplicity for recording short jams. You need to have a method to get a rough draft recording down very quickly without much thought. Therefore, I highly recommend simply starting out with a tape recorder, digital meeting/voice ...


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With any solo, you want to tell a story. The licks, riffs and grooves are your words. Writers structure stories as narrative arcs. A narrative arc is usually: Exposition: The introduction the story in which characters are introduced, setting is revealed. Rising Action: A series of events that complicate matters for the protagonist, creating a rise in ...


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One option is mental practice, in which you basically are imagining, in as much detail as you can, what you would be practicing. You do this in terms of feel, movement, and the sound your movement would produce. I play violin, and find that when I’m spending half an hour in the evening or morning doing this, my playing improves more than when I only play. ...


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I had no idea roll-up pianos existed! Checking out their reviews, even for the expensive ones that come with foot pedals, I would suggest they're fun unless you're used to the real thing, in which case you'll find they're unplayable, that's how it seems. As they're not played in the same way, I would say they're not sufficient to practice with. There ...


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A little bit of rubato isn't necessarily a bad thing, playing with time is one way to make it music (rather than computer programming). With that said, there are times when it is completely inappropriate. The most obvious is when there is an ostinato figure going on under the melody and counterpoint (if any). For example, think about Granados Villanesca, ...


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I guess that you'll never be exactly stable but you can be more precise with practice. If your problem is getting good records, you can record your instrument and then "stretch" the track to resolve tempo problems.


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The important thing is to feel the pulse of the tempo in your head as you play. Tap your foot if it helps you. When listening to music, tap your foot, clap or drum on your legs, to reinforce that instinct for rhythm. Do, however, bear in mind that when playing unaccompanied, it's not always vital to keep a rigid tempo. Some pieces benefit from expressive ...


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I have always found the input on ultimateguitar quite useful. It's simple and straightforward, but useful nonetheless. 1. Always Practise With A Metronome It sounds simple I know but a metronome is an invaluable tool for any musician when used properly it can keep you in perfect time. I have a metronome app for my smart phone which cost nothing ...


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Grouping idea sounds good but to understand the odd time signatures feeling i would like to give you some examples: As we walk with a constant speed we could say that we are walking with a simple 2 beat time signature as in 2/4 or 6/8 or at some points 4/4. Imagine a cripple guy or some one who is shot in leg drags on of his feet on the ground. in this ...


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I disagree with some posters here who think that digital piano equals or betters an acoustic one. And I own a digital piano, and currently don't have an acoustic one, even though I always had one (right now I own a synthesizer with fully weighted keyboard that serves both as a digital piano and as a synthesizer - Kurzweil). Bad acoustic pianos should be ...


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You cannot learn to play an acoustic piano well on a digital piano. You cannot play a digital piano incorrectly because they do not sample the bad, tin-ny, percussive sounds a piano can make when you bang on it. Everything sounds beautiful even if you don't know how to play it beautifully on an "real"/acoustic piano. That may not be a bad thing for a ...


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The accepted answer states proposes the middle finger on the key bass to start. It is listed under "as a general rule (for my songs so far)". I tend to suspect that the parenthetical remark points to little actual experience underlying the urge to provide a helpful answer to another beginner. That's actually a rather strange starting position: the typical ...


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To make a good start, correctly, one should have an instrument that emulates a proper piano - touch sensitive, with a balanced action. A lot of keyboards, whilst looking like pianos, with the black and white bits, will play nothing like them The response is just very different. So, if one wants to get it right, that's paramount. Scales (and chords and ...


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As a complete beginner, I would recommend that you take at least a couple of lessons from a good teacher. I self-taught on guitar and bass but I had bad technique and ended up injuring my hands as a result, something that never happened to me when I learned piano from a teacher. If you can't get a teacher then here's a site that may help you avoid some of ...


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My answer would be to buy a small multi-effects unit specifically for the purpose of playing at home, with an "amp simulator" and plug it into your home stereo or something. You can get a pretty massive sound without it having to be loud even with a low-end effects box. I use a cheap zoom effects box (actually because it has a fabulous digital tuner ...


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On the other hand, you could load your apartment full of soft things like curtains, blankets, sofas, carpets, etc. Soft stuff will absorb more noise and allow you to turn up your amp just a little bit louder. The more absorbent material you place in that room, the better "soundproofed" it will be.



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