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0

I play the violin and have a similar problem. I personally like this music game for android. It asks you to play notes on your instrument and gives you feedback to tell you when you are doing it correctly. I would highly recommend it to anyone trying to learn to read sheet music or trying to improve there reading abilities. The game isn't perfect I have ...


0

I used to DJ (well, still do, but not as frequently), and wearing ear plugs used to impede my ability to beat match. I still heard the beat, but all the finer points of the track (including the higher frequency stuff), felt "muddled" compared to open air listening, making it harder to identify the phrases in the song. This was experienced even with high ...


3

Are there specific ear plugs that are made to protect one's hearing and yet maintain some level of detail in the sound? Yes, those kind of earplugs are called flat-response attenuators (or more informally musicians earplugs), meaning that the frequency response that follows the shape of the natural frequency response of the open ear, but at a reduced ...


5

When I practice with my band, and when we do gigs, I always wear earplugs. It does not affect the ability to hear details in the music, to hear what the other band members are doing. Everybody else in the band always wears theirs. I use the earplugs that are sold at music shops (such as Guitar Center). (I don't use all-purpose foam earplugs.) Edit: I would ...


3

I wear earplugs when I have to perform or attend in loud venues. The problem with earplugs is that I lose more of the highs than the mids or lows. I use hi-fidelity earplugs that let me hear frequencies better. These have no substantial effect on my ability to perform, although my fun factor goes down a teensy bit. Examples of hi-fi earplugs can be ...


21

I write from personal experience -- I now always wear earplugs as an audience member in big gigs. When music is very loud, it impairs your ability to hear detail. Pitch and even rhythm become difficult to discern. At a certain level of loudness, your brain "fills in" the detail. This is why it's a good idea to play demo tapes loud to A&R men, but keep ...


5

I use ear plugs and the frequency range I'm hearing shrinks. I don't hear highs and lows as clear as I would without them. But I protect my hearing and it is worth it. Lowering stage volume and good monitoring system (in ear) will help if you choose no ear plugs. this site can help with ear plugs and maintaining details: check out ...


0

Get a hold of "George Van Eps Guitar Method" - buy it, find it on the interweb thing, check out triad exercises on ewetube. It is the ultimate foundation guide for triads that will open up the fretboard and unlock your hidden potential, the enabler to show music aficionados why you are on this planet.


3

I use a Boss Micro-BR for doing this kind of practice. (At the moment, I just select a random page from a Real Book, record the chords, and then use this backing to sight-read the melody over and practise some improvisation.) The recording quality of the Micro-BR isn't that amazing, but the functionality is. Off the top of my head: 4 track multi-track ...


3

The Boss RC-30 is a very good looper that has an XLR input for a microphone and stereo/mono input for when you get your electro-acoustic. It is a dual track looper, with some effects, 99 memory slots, up to 3 hours recording. You can also connect this to your computer and save/load your loops. For putting down a phrase and then playing over it etc, I would ...


3

I realize some people will probably not like this answer, but I am going to say it anyway: I am a very strong believer in simplicity for recording short jams. You need to have a method to get a rough draft recording down very quickly without much thought. Therefore, I highly recommend simply starting out with a tape recorder, digital meeting/voice ...


6

With any solo, you want to tell a story. The licks, riffs and grooves are your words. Writers structure stories as narrative arcs. A narrative arc is usually: Exposition: The introduction the story in which characters are introduced, setting is revealed. Rising Action: A series of events that complicate matters for the protagonist, creating a rise in ...


1

One option is mental practice, in which you basically are imagining, in as much detail as you can, what you would be practicing. You do this in terms of feel, movement, and the sound your movement would produce. I play violin, and find that when I’m spending half an hour in the evening or morning doing this, my playing improves more than when I only play. ...


2

I had no idea roll-up pianos existed! Checking out their reviews, even for the expensive ones that come with foot pedals, I would suggest they're fun unless you're used to the real thing, in which case you'll find they're unplayable, that's how it seems. As they're not played in the same way, I would say they're not sufficient to practice with. There ...


2

A little bit of rubato isn't necessarily a bad thing, playing with time is one way to make it music (rather than computer programming). With that said, there are times when it is completely inappropriate. The most obvious is when there is an ostinato figure going on under the melody and counterpoint (if any). For example, think about Granados Villanesca, ...


2

I guess that you'll never be exactly stable but you can be more precise with practice. If your problem is getting good records, you can record your instrument and then "stretch" the track to resolve tempo problems.


12

The important thing is to feel the pulse of the tempo in your head as you play. Tap your foot if it helps you. When listening to music, tap your foot, clap or drum on your legs, to reinforce that instinct for rhythm. Do, however, bear in mind that when playing unaccompanied, it's not always vital to keep a rigid tempo. Some pieces benefit from expressive ...


4

I have always found the input on ultimateguitar quite useful. It's simple and straightforward, but useful nonetheless. 1. Always Practise With A Metronome It sounds simple I know but a metronome is an invaluable tool for any musician when used properly it can keep you in perfect time. I have a metronome app for my smart phone which cost nothing ...


1

Grouping idea sounds good but to understand the odd time signatures feeling i would like to give you some examples: As we walk with a constant speed we could say that we are walking with a simple 2 beat time signature as in 2/4 or 6/8 or at some points 4/4. Imagine a cripple guy or some one who is shot in leg drags on of his feet on the ground. in this ...



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