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Funny you are 18, since this is exactly the same age I started getting to production. Prior to this I was into DJing. At age 19 (sophomore year), I realized that my music sucked, my music was not cohesive, and basically everything you just described as being your problem. My solution? I enrolled in a Music Theory Fundamentals class at my college, which ...


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If you're playing in a local band, memorizing everything might be an option. My experience in bands was that the volume of music precluded memorization. If your show is 15-20 minutes, sure, but an hour of music is a lot, especially on keyboards. Playing from music on mallets in an ensemble is harder than any other instrument I've tried. This is because the ...


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To build familiarity with this action, you may first practice a piece you already know, or just scales-- one time, focus on making one hand louder than the other, and the next time, focus on the other hand. Play as slow as you need to, to get the "feeling" correct, or at least, not as alien or hard. After that warm-up, practice the passage in which you need ...


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The technique I have used and the technique that is taught by guitar teacher Tom Hess is to break the technique down into 3 parts and practice each in isolation. These parts are: pitch, tempo and contour. Practicing pitch refers to consistently bending (vibrato is a slight bend) to a higher pitch and then back to the original pitch. Bending up a half step ...


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When starting to work on any technique like this, I've found it's good to isolate it down to something so incredibly simple that you are focusing only on the technique and its clarity and not at all on the happenings of a piece. You can use a very simple five finger exercises you already know very well (ex. Hanon 1), but to start, I would recommend just ...


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You can focus much more easily on the dynamics by making everything else easier (and thus either automatic or requiring little attention). You could practise playing this way with a simpler piece or one you already know well. Slowing down is also very effective — as a extreme example, if you're only pressing one note every 10 seconds is makes it ...


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As a mature (elderly?) learner, I faced a similar difficulty about a year ago, and found these ideas helped: With the "quiet" hand, keep the fingers as close to the keys as possible at all times (if possible, make sure that they never actually lose contact with the keys) and lift the fingers of the other hand off the keys before playing the note (loudly). ...


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Mentorship: If you want to be a performing musician, then your teachers should be other performing musicians--your current and future peers. Teachers in an academic setting don't always know how to perform. I've had a stable regularly performing band for about twenty years now. Everything I learned about being a performing musician I learned from other ...


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Particularly in a University setting, you should contact the director of the school's band or orchestra. There are likely many, many small events in the school calendar where a music ensemble would be very welcome. Any sort of small reception or lunch can be made more inviting with a musical group. I was in my school's Jazz Combo which was one of a few ...


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I have been working the cajon for the past 10 years or so on gigs from jazz to flamenco. The use of the Vater Blue Brushes are very effective in creative performance. Add the foot Afrushe-cabasa on one free foot, a bass foot pedal on the other and hand held castanets for Kata Palo Ceco patterns on the cajon's rim and see what happens.


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I've answered the following numerous times to questions like these. If you really want to take your musicianship to the next level, spend time understanding classical western harmony rather than doing "shortcuts" like saying the note of each fret out loud. Once you have a firm grasp on theory fundamentals, you won't have to "memorize" notes; rather you ...


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I admire and respect your dedication to continued improvement. One thing I have learned after many years of playing guitar is that no matter how good you get, there is always ample room for improvement. That's a good thing because it keeps the guitar fresh and interesting. I can continue to improve until I am no longer on the north side of the grass. ...


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Aside from Todd's suggestion, I also recommend: Trying to play something from ear (listen to something, then try playing it without looking for the tab/score). Playing by ear is an incredibly useful skill. Try a bit of sight reading every day. Both from tab and standard/classic notation. These are both skills that may not be essential in the short term, ...


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Keep playing songs you like also, and more importantly make part of your routine learning new songs you like. Also I would add something 100% creative, whether it's writing a new riff or chord progression, improvising over changes, or coming up with different sounds, or even better all of the above. You shouldn't have to detune before tuning. If you have a ...


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Since asking the question I have discovered an excellent series of tutorials on classical guitar vibrato technique by Douglas Niedt. Here is a link to the first video. One technique he describes (which I did not know was possible) is adding vibrato on open strings and harmonics by fretting the same note, maybe in a lower octave, on another string and ...


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It does take practice to get the feel of the rhythm. But if you can listen to a song and tap your finger to the beat on a table, then you have the skills needed to learn to play the guitar and keep the rhythm. The strumming pattern you use will have an effect on your ability to maintain an appropriate rhythm for a particular song. On many patterns you may ...


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Practice clapping along to music. Start with dance music with a heavy clear 4/4 beat (if you're not sure, ask someone to find you some). Clap along to the bass drum and count to four as you do it, so you feel the first beat of each bar. Also try clapping to the off-beat -- beats 2 and 4 of each bar. Or pick a drum sound and clap to that even if it's a more ...


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Start by giving yourself the most advantage: Location on a string: Start with all your fingers fretting notes on the same string in the middle of the neck. The closer to the 12th fret you are, the more it is possible to move the note. String selection: Start with a string where you can get a good grip on the string (a wound string). I recommend the 4th ...


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You can always start to do vibrato exercises. Do your scales with vibrato. You can do them with the three main vibrato techniques. The cocking of the wrist movement. The vibrato in the left hand fingers bending the notes up and down and the vibrato in the left hand finger bending the notes right to left (Along the neck) Mastery is achieved when you can ...


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This vibrato is rolling the finger along the length of the string on a particular fret. Don't try to slide it. To do it effectively, the fingertip will move from back to front of the fret space. With the thumb tight on the back of the neck, it restricts movement, so it's best to free the thumb off. I tend to bring the thumb out level with the fingers quite ...


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how can I practice getting fully in time with the drums on a track It's doable. We had a similar situation in one project, and with some preparation it ended up sounding great. Depending on what you are doing, it might be more trouble than it's worth, but if you really want and/or need to do it, you can. First of all, if the drum part was played by a ...


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Instead of learning the "best" or "correct" fingering for every different scale, I think it's better to learn some general principles, and then work out the details for yourself. The repeated pattern of fingers is 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 - but not necessarily starting on 1, because .... Don't use your thumb on the black keys. With the right hand, use your thumb on ...


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I've been suffering similar tendonitis, but was diagnosed with both Tennis and Golf Elbow which basically means that the tendons on the top of my forearm, and the bottom, as if you were putting your palm out were badly inflamed along with inflammation of several nerve sheaths that were actually visibly inflamed. Basically my fretting arm was a train wreck! ...


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It took me years to realize that it is not so much finger muscle as much as dexterity. In fact, using too tight of grip between your thumb and fretting finger will cause undue strain and fatigue. So my trick was to utilize driving time by placing my thumb on the front of the steering wheel and my fingers behind it, and just taking turns tapping them ...


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I myself have found nothing useful in physical exercise away from the guitar. You have to understand that positioning your fingers correctly and applying the correct amount of tension to the strings on a fretboard is a very fine tuned process, and that control is more important than pure strength. Hell, I have three guitars with different setups and there's ...


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There's an exercise my old guitar teacher taught me wherein he had me, finger by finger, stretch each finger (excluding my thumbs( as close as I could to the bottom of my palm, back and forth on both hands. There is also a workout tool called a hand clamp that you can use to build hand/finger strength. Here's a link to see what they are/look like: ...


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If you can find an old wooden clothes pin, just enough pressure not to cause a strain but after enough reps. on each finger and I promise you will notice the effort does increase. Spank you veddy, and play on!!!!


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You definitely don't want to ingrain bad technique. On the other hand, I wouldn't want you to think that you have no control over your technique. So I would recommend that when you are not able to hit your target tempo, that you practice the passage, but at a tempo that does work, while making sure that you don't have any technical problems, such as ...


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Yes, I would recommend that course of action. Your brain and muscles don't really care whether you're doing it "right", they're just going to burn it in exactly as you're doing it. So if you are not doing well it would be best to slow down, try something easier, or take a break. You can certainly do extra while you are in the zone as well, but take care not ...


1

I have unfortunately had tennis elbow in both my elbows over the years. I am a panel beater and a guitar player. I've tried icing and stretching exercises and had cortisone injections when it got unbearable. By far the best for pain relief is a clasp that fits over my forearm just below my elbow. A simple device made of material and Velcro , a bit Like a ...


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Ben Kushigan's suggestions are great for practicing intonation specifically. I've also got a few suggestions to help recognize when you are off while playing in general. The single piece of advice that most improved my intonation was to not watch my left hand. Instead, look into the distance, or watch the bow. Play against a drone tone. Set your computer ...


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Try finding a song with a lot of activity on the snare and make all (or even some of) the accents rim-shots. I find Californication really fun to practice rim-shots and drags to because the snare part is very involved with drags, rim shots and accents immediately after rim-shots (a skill which can be harder to learn than you may expect), but really any song ...


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If you can already play, let's say, 3 chords, e.g. E, A and B7, and change cleanly between them, you are capable of playing hundreds of songs ! You just need to play the chords in the order they come in each song. Maybe you want to learn that order, maybe you can read the chords like words in a story as you go along. Chords tend to come in 'families', where ...


0

If you are looking at scales, intervals, chord formulas, techniques, tones and effects, you are not preparing for "songs" (which imply singing) but rather "playing" as a musical instrument rather than as something to go along with singing. There is considerable overlap in both, of course. The important thing is to focus on the things you find fun. Now ...


2

Everyone learns differently and ultimately it depends on your goals. Presumably, though, you're learning guitar in order to play songs — and you can't very well do that without actually playing songs :P Getting solid basis in theory and exercises is excellent, but it cannot teach you everything. If you want to learn to play songs you will absolutely ...


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You can put some thin tapes on the fingerboard to show you where to put your fingers. Make sure you do a simple warm-up at the beginning every day, in which you are getting very comfortable with where each finger "belongs". For example, play the first half of a scale a few times, without worrying about rhythm, bowing, tone production, etc., just ...


1

Playing the violin in key goes hand in hand with your aural skills. You need to be able to recognise the false notes and be able to correct them yourself. A good idea is to maybe do the Sulfa system so can in your mind play the first note of a scale and know how all of the other notes in the scale sound. You can also try to do scales with the piano if your ...


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Learning intonation on violin is difficult a) because a new student doesn't necessarily have intonation in their ears so it is hard to judge accuracy and b) because even if the student does have relatively decent intonation it's not a trivial task to get the fine muscle control to execute an in-tune note. I'll lay down some basic suggestions and then get a ...



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