Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

This has been covered to some extent before, but you have a few options. I live in an apartment so I understand where you are coming from. I play both acoustic and electric and have never had complaints from the neighbors. I actually bought a small practice amp for daytime playing on the electric, and late at night I'll either play electric unplugged, play ...


0

Picking style on an electric guitar is entirely different. You use a pick rather than your fingernails (there is no way the nails will survive the razor-blade-like higher strings for any useful amount of time). There are fingerpicks with sort-of mounts which you stick on individual fingers, but I don't think I've seen then in any serious use. Instead, ...


3

Switching from classical guitar to electric is going to take some time and practice. While you may be familiar with playing a nylon-stringed guitar, not all of those skills will transfer over easily or quickly to an electric. The best advice I can give you is simple: give it time, and keep practicing. It's not quite the same as learning the guitar from ...


1

It's quite subjective, regarding a given piece but also the individual who's learning that piece. Yes, read the score through, spotting the awkward parts, the bits that repeat (and are still fully written out), highlighting certain important tricky bits. Playing verbatim is for good readers, who may not even have to learn the piece ! Unless that's you, ...


1

Repeating what my piano teacher told me. should I read the score without even touching the piano? Most definitely. Read the score thoroughly, identify tricky parts, memorize all repeats/stops and tonality/rhythm changes, create a mental mapping between how you know it sounds and the actual notes on paper. Only after you do all that put your hands on ...


0

I started in the drums world with Guitar Hero game. My brother gave me Wii as a present and I bought drum set for Guitar Hero. Except for distances (it is really small), it will give you a lot of training for coordination, but not for touch, of course...


0

There's a guide, in Portuguese called Baterna http://aurelio.net/baterna/ (sorry, I am from Brazil, and this thing is the perfect answer for your question) that teaches people how to play drums without drums, if you can translate it with Google Translate or something, it is worth a read.


1

The most cost effective method is pillow practice (or alternatively hit any object that makes the stick bounce easily although the lesser it bounces the better your technique will be with making up for lost motion.) practice paradiddles and any song riffs you know and even listen to new songs / genres to get a wide variety of techniques and progressions. ...


3

Bob Broadley is right if you want to practice ONLY the stick technique : buy a pad. So you will be able to train your touch and etc... which is nice. Now, there are several things you can do if you want to improve your drumming in a more "evolved" way. First of all, buy a bass drum's pedal. This is always a good investment, since you will get used to your ...


4

Use a practice pad. All the professional drummers I know use one regularly to practise stick technique and rudiments. Also, the drum teachers I know advise their pupils to use practice pad, particularly if they are unable to practise on a full kit.


3

A great way to get started in barbershop is to join a barbershop chorus. These are large choirs that sing barbershop music. Joining one will have lots of benefits for you. You'll be able to sing right away without the pressure of having to carry a whole part by yourself. You'll learn lots of standard barbershop songs and harmonies. You'll make lots of ...


0

One thing that struck me in your description of your problem that you feel safest central in your group of basses. However, choir balance and intonation and harmony depends on being able to sing in relation to the other voices. Running away from the other voices may make you feel safer but it's not an actual solution to the problem you have as part of a ...


0

As others mentioned: key signatures are valid for all octaves. With one notable exception: scordatura. Scordatura notation is sometimes used for bowed string instruments. In scordatura, the strings are tuned in an uncommon pattern. The notation, however, uses normal notes in a normal staff to indicate how a note is to be fingered rather than how it is ...


6

I have two answers, but first a caveat: I'm a singer, and I firmly believe that, as a singer, a solid technique should let you sing in any style — but rap isn't really my thing (like, I don't even recognize the name "Mike Shinoda"), so my advice is going to be about basic, healthy vocal technique in general (especially for men, which I'm guessing you are one ...



Top 50 recent answers are included