Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

It worked for Hendrix! Why not, though, learn hammering and pulling left handed - after all, your r.h. should be stronger (as a r.h. person). Then you could try two guitars simultaneously. The job would be more successful, as hinted at by leftaroundabout, to use a standard r.h. guitar.


0

Well – why not? It can hardly hurt to try unusual new stuff. But frankly if you just learn to play left-handed guitar left-handed, as well as the same stuff right-handed on right-handed guitar, I don't see the point either. This “can play anything with either hand” boasting is, well... IMO it's ridiculous. What would be rather more interesting ...


2

Google has been my friend to at least establish that I'm not the only one with this problem :) It isn't so much making the chord, but doing so without compromising either the high E or the Bb. Even professionals tend to either duck the high E in order to get a nice full C7 (including John Williams, yes check it out!), or stretch to the high E and partially ...


0

While there are some very good answers here, I just want to add something else that might help. Play tunes you know very very well. Doesn't matter what it is, or how easy it is, just play a melody that you know inside and out. I'm talking nursery rhymes and folk songs here. Could even be a cheesy pop song's melody that you've known since you were a ...


1

I used to have tapes on my violin when I was learning to play, but when you put a finger on the tape you cannot see where exactly it touches the string and likely you are going to be slightly off and even 0.5mm off can be a great difference in the purity of the sound. The only way to play right is to develop the correct hearing. Listen to a few basic scales ...


2

I think it's rather inept & cruel of your teacher to tell you your playing is void of emotion. That's subjective, and is intangible so very hard to know how to fix, or know when you've fixed it. Even if you did, you'd only have been satisfying your teacher. I'm really sorry to hear it made you quit. Example: I find Bon Jovi utterly devoid of emotion or ...


1

Lacking a good connection to some cover song is OK: simply play something else - something you can feel. Or consider trying to write and sing your own songs, be they either vocal or instrumental. There's nothing wrong with hitting the right notes... sometimes the note itself is wrought with emotion and a perfectionist will find the emotion behind the note in ...


1

An actor in a play appears to be in a murderously bad mood. Is he really like that? Whilst you may not be a professional, it's entirely possible to put yourself in the right mood to play a particular piece. If it's a gentle lilting song, get the imagination working before you start - lying in a lush field, sun shining, all's right with the world, etc. On ...


0

Well...Emotion is a vague concept. People sometimes inherit it naturally while others have to practice it. When playing the guitar especially, you need to realize what you are doing and why you are doing it. Playing the note accurately is not about playing the guitar. Just check out 'Buckethead', one of my all time favorite guitarists. He brings out such an ...


0

Listen to the song a few times, then see if you can figure out the mood the composer was trying to convey. Then, try forgetting about the timing and play with the song. See if you can find a track with just the voice or guitar and playing/singing with it. For example. swing. The notation is two 8th notes, but you play/sing it as a quarter/eighth triplet, ...


3

We all experience considerable frustration when learning a musical instrument. Two years is, in general, simply not enough time to be expressing emotions effectively in ones playing. Depending on your age, this may just be a natural state of affairs. Males in the mid-teens to early-twenties are often overwhelmed by other issues and may subconsciously ...


0

You can play along with MIDI playback. MIDI is computer generated and have perfect rhythm and pitch. But you need to develop your ears also.


1

Can you find some other way to break the problem into simpler steps other than by starting slow and gradually speeding up? For example, go straight for your target tempo, but practice shorter fragments? Also, have you taken a step back and looked at your technique? Maybe it would be worth experimenting with different fingerings or hand positions? A ...


1

I would like someone to help with a run down of everything they do when they practice, step by step. Start by doing some relaxing exercises, without the instrument. I don't know how it's called, but I really like to let my upper body fall down, like I was trying to touch my feet with my hands. I guess anything really would be great, but remember to ...


3

Well that's not exactly the way to practice scales because that's not how our memory works. A memory is stronger if it is related to more memories. And remember that you are exercising your brain, not your fingers. If the exercise doesn't make you think then it's not a good exercise. Now, the most basic way to practice a scale while making you think is ...


0

there are several ways of using the metronome,u can try this out.practice your scalem,lick,transcribe solos,exercise etc on the beat per measure that is,whole,half,8th,16th etc.for instance when you have your metronome set to 70BPM,You can apply any of the above mention beats to it,this is a gud way of using your metronome to practice,it enables you play the ...


0

I was in a similar boat, and for me, the mystery thing you're looking for is "aural awareness". If I could go back in time to little me, I would have me working on it much sooner, much more. What has worked for are the following: ear training on your instrument: get good at playing back any random set of pitches. I use "GoodEarPro" on the ipad. It's great ...


1

Whilst music, obviously, can be played and enjoyed on your own, it's a bit like communication. Needs someone else. Try to find someone or some two or three others to play with. Find ways to share/split songs up between you, so you become part of a jigsaw, part of a team. This will help to understand how the music is put together, how it all fits, without ...


5

It sounds like you actually have quite a bit of "real" skill already. I'm not sure there's such a thing as "fake" skill. Are you sure you might not have a touch of Imposter Syndrome going on? But beyond that, you mention that where you feel that you lack is in being able to translate back and forth between what you see on a page and what you hear in your ...



Top 50 recent answers are included