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1

In music theory from Ricci Adams you have online exercise note exercise on top the is a toggle switch which you could change from letters to solfege. I hope I was a help.


1

The "most effective and correct way" is the way that brings out the music. It's a bit different for everyone. Don't ever get the idea that you will first learn the notes and then breathe the music into it. The worst thing that you can do is to get so involved in the technical details of a passage that you lose sight of the music it's intended to convey. ...


1

I want to suggest that you read from the bulletproof musician online. http://www.bulletproofmusician.com/ I subscribe to emails from them and they often have helpful things to say about practicing effectively. However, if you want to be a big soloist one day you need to practice more. Three hours a week really doesn't do it. Some people practice up to 8 ...


1

The lower staff is usually written in bass clef, but not always. The upper staff is usually written in treble clef, but not always. The reason that the lower staff starts in the treble clef is exactly what Tim says. Whatever works best is whatever clef is used. Also, the lower staff of the two usually is played by the left hand, but not always. Vice ...


2

One's hands are always placed over the notes one is going to play. Otherwise one's fingers won't reach!! So, in this case, both hands are further to the right than usual, as the tune is written higher than normal, shown by two treble clefs. The theory is that it's easier to read than looking at lots of ledger lines. Don't think there's a specific term for ...


4

Generally, the right hand plays the notes on the upper staff and the left hand the notes on the lower. Clefs are usually chosen to reduce the number of ledger lines. This should work well in your example.


0

I've seen this quote from Charlie Parker in many places... "I was working over 'Cherokee' and, as l did, I found that by using the higher intervals of a chord as a melody line and backing them with the appropriately related changes, I could play the thing I'd been hearing. I came alive." The part "higher intervals of a chord as a melody line" catches my ...


1

This odd sensation could simply just be a bunch of muscles that otherwise do not get a lot of exercise may start to begin developing now. You develop muscle with in the fine motor reflexes that do not otherwise develop much when a person does not play any dexterity based instrument. I would only worry about it if you start experiencing pain but until then ...


2

That used to happen to me quite a bit when I took a sabbatical from my day job and started playing guitar all day long. I can only attribute my experience to fatigue and over training. I could feel that my fingers and hands were stiffening up. What you are experiencing could very well be related to how much muscle fatigue your hands and fingers have been ...


3

I think it's because we're human. Humans are fallible - proved by many every day! If we were machines, we'd do the same thing at the same level each time. But we're not. We get tired, we are in 'the wrong mood', we have other things that seem to take precedence, etc., etc. If the practice isn't working, then why continue? There'll always be a better time ...



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