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-1

Hang both of them on the wall. Really. Like they do in the music stores. You will begin to pick one up for one thing, and the other for another thing. This way your style may lead you to be more proficient on one, or favor one, or both. Your decision will come from experience, instead of limiting your experience with a decision now. I have six guitars ...


1

Following on from Shev's really good answer, other facets are to be able to play each song at different tempos, and in different keys. Often jazz players 'mess around' with standards, and use different tempos, and sometimes time sigs change, just for fun - or a challenge. Keys will change for songs as they become dependent on the vocalist. "I know xyz is in ...


4

What I think you should be able to do is: Play the melody fluently; if you can learn it by heart, even better, but if not don't worry. Play the melody slightly varied. If you listen to the same jazz song by many artists, you'll see that none of them play it the same. Everyone changes it a bit here and there. That's something you'll have to do yourself. ...


0

I've practiced with a metronone for long enough to develope that internal pulse. After hearing a very good lesson by Troy Stetina I've realized it's time to go to a drum machine because he talks about the importance of being able to listen to everything the drums are doing including the fills. I also now remember Malcolm Young saying in an interview that ...


2

If you think you are 'already sorted' with classical guitar, you must be a guitar God. Can you seriously pick up a piece by Bach, transpose it to guitar while sight reading and play it perfectly? I have been playing for 13 years and my daily practice looks more or less like this: Warmup with scales (major and harmonic minor modes, plectrum and no plectrum) ...


1

I think all drumers with a dominant hand experiences this. The way I've been best able to get my hands even were 3 steps (for me anyway ) First, play all your rudiments with a click. On all 3 go for longer periods of time, but make sure everything is clean before you crank up the speed. 2nd I'll play 16th noted 4 bars of 16ths 9n each hand, and throw 8n a ...


1

imagine a guitar with lots of strings all tuned exactly a 4th apart. if we map the intervals of a major scale onto a portion of this imaginary guitar we get something like this - where the numbers represent degrees of an (unspecified) major scale. ----------------------- | | | | | 7 3 6 2 5 1 4 ----------------------- 7 3 6 2 5 1 4 | | | | | ...


0

One thing that really locked everything in place for me was the idea that all the scales are essentially interleaved arpeggios (in the loosest sense of the terms) of a chord played at different positions on the fretboard. For A, you have open A, then you have the "barred G pattern for A", where the open A is the barre for the G pattern. This G pattern is ...


1

For me: I started with the good old pentatonic & got used to playing that, then quickly added notes 2 & 6 into my memorised "shape" on the fretboard to turn it into a fulsome minor scale. Move the same fret pattern down 3 frets and it struck me that this is the same set of notes as a major scale in the original key. OR you can just sharpen the ...


2

One of my music teachers told us that, before every concert, he always planned to improve his performance in some specific way - to use more expression during a particular phrase, for example. Then, his thinking was focused on making beautiful music and succeeding in that one improvement. He was a very nervous performer, and this worked for him. I ...


2

With most pieces that you practice a lot you can get to a place where you can play it through whilst thinking about your grocery list but as soon your attention snaps back to what you are doing you start to make mistakes or you lose your place and can't remember what comes next. At this point you're relying almost entirely on muscle memory. I have found ...


4

Record yourself with a decent quality recording device (although these days even a smartphone mic is of decent quality) playing the piece all the way through. Don't stop for mistakes. When you are finished, sit down with the score and pencil in hand and put any phrase where you hear a mistake in parenthesis. If space is available, indicate the problem with ...


2

I'm in a similar predicament, these are the steps I've decided to follow: 1 I can play most individuals sections (excluding more difficult passages) rapidly, but the piece itself falls apart unless played at a slower tempo: I just reached the "learned" stages but am not sufficiently familiar with the piece. There are too many possible mistakes I must ...


8

It's hard to translate this into definite advice without one-to-one tuition, but I think the key is not to "learn pieces" but "learn to play your instrument". Learning pieces, especially if it involves lots of practice for one particular piece, is like "teaching to the test" in school, rather than teaching the subject. Try keeping a list of your "random" ...


11

I suspect that if you keep making random mistakes with a specific piece and you are not generally out of shape (as in, "I have been playing three hours a month for the past six months") you probably did an half-assed job at learning the piece in the first place. What works for me in these situations is Taking out the metronome, setting it to davvero ...


12

I can identify with your situation. I play guitar and sing primarily, and am constantly learning new songs to perform. Some songs are very easy but others take more practice to learn to play proficiently. Invariably, on the songs that are more difficult to learn, the first time I perform it for a live audience, I experience the same thing you are ...


2

Listen to the recordings of the piece played by professionals. Every time you feel like you plateau at a certain level, it's usually because you've already incorporated all the improvements that you feel are necessary, and you don't know how else to further improve/master the song. But more often than not, actively listening to the song done by ...


4

Hah. This may benefit from some context (Genre? Situation? Are you the soloist?). Assuming you'll be playing an instrument in an amplified rock/pop combo: Metronome metronome metronome. Practice separate hands, practice each section separately, each bar at all sorts of crazy tempos. Slow, medium, insanely fast. You never know how caffeinated the drummer ...


2

Just play it over and over again. There's not much anyone can say here. You can play it until you learn the notes and the positions, thus your hands moving automatically and then see where you make mistakes and focus on those parts.


0

I'd probably use a metronome and start slow and speed it up when I feel comfortable. This question might not have one best answer because each person probably has different areas of most difficulty. For me it's timing, hence the metronome. Playing along with a recording of the piece is also a good quick learn trick, if a recording is available.


13

I would suggest you take note of the parts you most commonly get wrong, and practice each of those parts as a mini "exercise". Write out the short section separately somewhere, and run through those parts in your practice routine. Once you've got them well practiced, make sure you can incorporate them smoothly into the surrounding sections. Practicing ...


3

Conveniently, guitars are set up so major scales can be played using all four fingers on four consecutive frets, to play two octaves. Minor scales can be played similarly, with only one slip down a fret on the 3rd string. All this assumes you start on the bottom string, and work up to the same fret on the top. The obvious (ubiquitous?) scales that work well ...


0

What I did to get to know my instrument was to learn all the modes that start from the Ionian mode (Major scale). Go to a simple tonality, like C or G (the low notes on guitar) and play the Ionian mode (In guitar you can play it for two octaves in one (or a bit more) position), ascending and then descending. After you've played it, go to the next mode, ...


4

Generally, it's good to practice everything everywhere. This helps you get to know the instrument you're playing better (this doesn't apply only to guitar) and helps you learn how to transpose the songs. But, if you still cannot play a song in a certain key, there isn't much point in transposing it. It might help if you transposed it into something that had ...


4

If I understand correctly, you have a midi file with N different tracks, and you want to create N sound files out of that where for each sound file, one of the tracks is proportionately louder than all the other tracks. If that's the case, you can do this with python and the fantastic music21 library: from music21 import * ##Load in a MIDI file st = ...


1

I would like someone to help with a run down of everything they do when they practice, step by step. Uh, that's a bit like saying you are a beginning hiker and you want a run down of everything a hiker does when walking downtown, step by step. The turns are different, the starting position is different, the gait is different, the training state is ...


1

You can sing along with a piano/guitar that is playing the melody. I believe this will be really efficient, because you'll hear the exact melody and you'll see where exactly is your problem, and you can work on it. I believe the piano would be best, as it has really clear overtones that will help you listen to a crystal clear melody.


1

I played piano, harpsichord and organ for a very long time and picked up viola early last year. As this wasn't the first instrument,I progressed very fast throguh the method book I was using (Methode d'Alto, Henri Classens, edition Combre - it is a little old French method book. No cbildren's songs at all, but as there is no explanations on technique, you ...


6

I don't think there is a definite answer here. I have been in bands where all the members act as 'leaders' at the same time and at bands where one is the leader. In most bands I know, there is a leader. There are pros and cons in both of them. When everyone in the band is a leader, thus making it a democracy, it is hard and time consuming to decide what ...


1

Learning to quickly form certain chords often takes an abundant amount of repetitive practice. There is not really a magic order of finger placement to make the chord in question easier to form quickly. The chord you describe is commonly referred to as an "A shaped barre chord". That chord shape is form of "movable" barre chord that can be used to play ...


2

The disconnect between chest and head voice that you experience is completely normal. It is called the passaggio. To minimize the difference in sound between the two vocal registers, you must gradually make them meet in the middle. Chest For your chest voice, try and raise your overall range in half-step increments. Use any of the standard effective ...


0

Hang on a second. You can't "practice" theory on a guitar, you can't even practice theory. If you want to (ergh)"practice" (READ: learn) theory, put the guitar down and grab pencil and paper. You CAN practice scales and chords, the sonic qualities of which you can explain with theory, but you aren't "practicing theory". So, if you have limited time, on ...


0

On reading your question a second time, I realized that you said you can't hit certain notes between falsetto and chest. Without any other knowledge, that kind of sounds like nodes or some other damage to your vocal chords, but you may just be confusing octaves. Don't yell too loud and don't screech, it can really damage your voice fast. Seriously, a quick ...


-1

You can also try half positions. Instead of using your I-M-A fingers for the left hand use the M-I and pinky. This will allow you to lock your hands and just slide the wholly affair down as you like. The economy of movement is much better like this and you get the added benefit of training your less intelligent left hand fingers (Looking at you pinky) Hope ...


0

With time and practice, everything gets easier. Consider just playing the best you can for now, so that you don't stunt creativity by slowing progress while trying to be perfect. As you get more comfortable with playing in general, you'll find it easy some day to add it in the extra notes.


0

I had a go on the website to whcih you referred - that's a great site ! I did quite well I think but it seems for me the larger intervals - 7ths / tritones etc are harder to get. I'm quite good at recognising chord structure and intervals in songs by ear. That's a bit different to the exercise on that website because there's generally a key and a context in ...


0

The Great thing about drums, is that it is a truly organic and primitive method of making sound, it can be performed on any and all materials (not recommended on Breakable surfaces - Glass etc) but any material that makes a sound can be used as a drum, pots and pans, desk and books (I annoy my workmates daily with that one) seats, bus handles, even your ...


0

Most of the practicing I've done in my life has been without the kit. The trick is to train your brain signal paths to move differently than they are naturally programmed (e.g. your right hand and right foot kind of naturally want to move together, but you train them to move separately). Your limbs can do it, and practice (with or without a kit) will get ...


3

Slide it, Man! In your "impossible" transition, I'm assuming you are already fingering an open A chord. The 2,3 and 4 fingers are in the same position as the B chord, right? Just two frets down (toward the nut). So, just leave them in position and "slide" them up to fret 4, then as they come into position plop your index finger for the barre. This will ...


2

The root of the problem is probably your overall left hand position. The A-shape barre chords need quite a lot of pronation to get the fingers all “in line”. By far the easiest setting to achieve this is a proper classical guitar position, i.e. with the arm reaching towards the guitar neck in almost a right angle from below. Buy a footrest and ...


3

Like with anything else, barre chords take time to play properly. I bet that your 1st finger isn't strong enough to correctly bar the 2nd fret all the way. I suggest figuring out where your limit is (where you can actually play an A shaped barre chord) and try switching to and from it to get use to it. A viable option if you need to play this progression ...


3

A couple of points. You don't have to leave out the bottom string. It can still be barred and played on the 2nd fret. You don't have to use three fingers for the strings 2,3 and 4. Obviously, 3 can be used, but you could make do with 2 or even 1, sort of 'barred' across the 3 strings, bent up so that the 1st string still sounds. B7 would work, although you ...


1

Melody and harmony are highly intertwined. As such, I've found that practicing intervals as a function of harmony to be the most practical and useful way to work on ear training both personally and with students. I do this by singing against/with a drone; I personally use the Tuning CD ...


0

The graphic you have shown us in not any sort of "drum score" that I've ever seen. Where did it come from? As a live drummer, you've got two hands and two feet. As computer programmers we can write as many simultaneous sounds as we like of course. Keeping to what's physically possible for a real player can be a good rule so as not to muddy up the ...


1

I think achieving full symmetry is really hard because for most people there are differences between their right and left hands, both physically and mentally. That being said, my best results for keeping both hands at similar technical levels has definitely been working through the classic rudiments and alternating which is the "lead" hand in the rudiment. ...


0

The answer to your questions is the same, and that is breathing and breath support. As said by Wheat, you need constant feedback by a professional singer who can correct you and help you get the feeling, because that's what it is.


2

To these excellent suggestions I would add -- every time you practice, don't just rely on the computer app and don't just rely on your singing voice and your ear. Also go to an instrument and play those intervals while you study. Pick any note at random and find the specific interval above and below. Train not only your voice and your ear, but also your ...


0

Just commenting on the "which intervals to focus on first" part. Can't/Don't want to improve in JCPedroza's answer other than that. I disagree about all of the intervals being equal. Some of them are much more rare than others. Some are much easier than others. This isn't just individual taste, some are objectively cleaner than others because their ratios ...


10

Any tips on how to make it sick, so to speak, when trying to internalize the distance between notes? There are three ways you can easily get those intervals in your head. Sing Singing the intervals will make learning them much more easier and effective. Try this before doing your interval exercises: Pick one interval you are having troubles with. ...


10

There aren't any special intervals you should focus on. All of them are equally important. What you can do is to find songs you know, with melodies you can sing, and see what kind of intervals they use. This way you'll remember what the intervals sound like. Now, no one can really suggest these kind of songs to you. They have to be songs you know and ...



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