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I've never heard of or had this in my fretting hand/arm. But I do have the same thing you have in my picking hand/arm. I wear a Tommy Copper sleeve for the elbow 3 to 4 times a week, plus a compression wrap. I also have a friend that has the same thing I do in his picking hand/arm. What I do is stretch constantly, I find the tendons in both my forearms are ...


2

Not so much how to practise, but how to make the difference between a regular strike & a rimshot easier to determine, plus an unexpected extra benefit. Change your snare drum angle. Or even all your drums' angles, if you want to be able to do this with accurate repetition round the entire kit. I have my entire kit set in such a way that the difference ...


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It's my - limited - personal experience that mixing and matching different topics/skills adds variety and that interaction between these skills helps improve your overall progress, enjoyment and musicality. The famous 30 hours Vai workout works in a similar way (if you remove the "not doing anything besides playing guitar" bit), so there's that. I would ...


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Any plan is better than no plan at all, but I think your proposal is too generalized. To make the best use of your time you need to set yourself very specific, and small, goals that you can achieve in a short timescale. Not "spending 20 minutes practicing chords, etc, every other day for the next year" but "How to finger chord X cleanly," or "how to make a ...


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It's been said in a comment, but deserves a fully-fledged reply: your biggest mistake is thinking you can do this without a teacher. Even if it's only a consultation lesson now and again - that's better than nothing. Note the number of people who have tried to give you a piano lesson in their replies!


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I personally believe (and have read in various semi-scientific books) that daily practice is best - not alternate days. I don't have any scientific proof for it - it's a matter of opinion - but if you agree you might like to try the "Lead Guitar Techniques" and "Rhythm Techniques" every day, to build your memory of these more rapidly. I agree with doing the ...


3

I have been a Suzuki coach for my two children. My experience was that it really helped to plan out the practice sessions. It's great that you want to give yourself some structure. I support your idea of alternating some of the activities. Do please make sure you give yourself some opportunity for spontaneity and inspiration. Perhaps you could build ...


2

Having a plan will help you monitor progress toward your goal(s). Whether it needs to be this detailed, more detailed, or less detailed is simply a matter of what works for you as playing is what is going to lead to successful achievement of your goal to learn lead and rhythm techniques. If a schedule inspires you to play and keeps you motivated to ...


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I experience this problem too sometimes. It is, as someone already mentioned, related to practicing the fingering/sticking/etc. But it is also related, at least from my experience, to something I would call "polymetric resolution", i.e. how much nuances are you able to produce metric-wise. I think what helps me the most with this is practicing a patter, ...


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I'd memorize the relation of the roots to the tonic for analysis and overview. However, I find it more musical, if I have to try and verbalize, to remember the relation of a note and the current (and sometimes previous and/or next) root.


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5 min won't get any a day get is not nearly enough. You need to spend 10,000 hours to truly master something. That something can be anything. So since you play the guitar and you don't put the time in and the right type of time, you won't get anywhere. A master pianist once told me you need to eliminate mistakes first. So practice scales or the piece of ...


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One of the arguments I have heard is to keep time on a cycle, not a line. If you're tapping your foot, think of it as though you were moving in a circle, with a tap near the bottom (realistically your foot will still move in a line, but what matters is how your mind is thinking about the motion, not the actual motion itself). When you tap your foot up and ...


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Using a metronome only has the demoralizing effect of making me want to turn it off. It's okay to turn your metronome off, so long as eventually you turn it back on again. The reason it's demoralizating is that it's exposing the faults in your playing. The reason that it's helpful is that it's... exposing the faults in your playing. The metronome is ...


3

Playing in tempo needs your brain to focus on the music and the tempo at the same time. Play very easy music with metronome (i would start doing quarter notes only) so your mind can focus on the tempo. Record yourself to listen relaxed after. And smile and have fun!


2

I have a few ideas. Play with a live person. It's fun to play duets. Or you could each take one hand of a piano piece. Connect some earbuds to an electronic metronome to give yourself a click track. Record the right hand of your piece on an mp3 player, listening to the click track in your ear while you're playing. Then plug the earbuds into the mp3 ...


4

I play and now teach ancient style rudimental snare drum, which has all kinds of screwy tempo things that happen and weird technique that makes certain patterns want to drag. Generally, the biggest hurdle to keeping a steady beat is fluency - your body gets in the way of what you're trying to do. To demonstrate this, can you clap to a beat? If you can, ...


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If it's that frustrating, don't start out trying to play a piece to the metronome. Just practice rhythm and timing separately from the melody. Does your metronome have a visual option, where you can turn the volume off, but it's still keeping time? Count a few beats with the metronome audible at a moderate tempo (80-120 bpm), and then turn the volume off, ...


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Truth is that it IS flat; however if you played A natural up high it wouldn't sound too bad because it's so far away in frequency terms. If it sounds "ok" then that's why.


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Start simple. Take a familiar tune like "Happy Birthday" and pick a starting note. Lets just pick "G" (this means you will be playing the tune in the key of C Major). Keep trying to play the song, re-starting from the beginning every time until you can get through the entire thing. At first, this will be difficult. You'll play the first 8 notes, and ...


2

I suggest starting with lead sheets, with melody and chords only. The term "playing by ear" was always a pejorative when I was young. It meant some kind of illiterate flailing at the instrument, maybe learning rote patterns with no idea of how they worked together musically. (Think of little kids playing "Heart and Soul" with four hands - great fun.) But ...


1

Most scales are assumed to be octave-repeating, due to the way that we hear a similarity between notes that are an octave apart (the reason for this being that with many instruments, any note contains harmonic partials at the frequencies of all the overtones of a note an octave below). This includes the diatonic scale, which is the scale that standard ...


2

Here are some suggestions, have a try and let us know how it goes: Get a feel for the tune CD player / Media player, play a tune that is not too complicated you have never learnt Listen to the whole tune a few times until you can hear in your head what the next melody will be before it plays Learn in parts - Play a few seconds at a time (a phrase) and ...



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