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12

Well this is a big question, so let me start with a big answer: http://www.amazon.com/Mixing-Secrets-Small-Studio-Senior/dp/0240815807/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1426508544&sr=1-1&keywords=mixing+secrets Now for the smaller answer more approriate to this format. A good mix starts with the arrangement before you even record. If the ...


8

This has been a raging debate for the past 30 years or so. There has been a healthy competition between the two platforms in an effort to corner a large segment of the market share. In the beginning, Macs targeted the creative artsy types and the platform had features and benefits specifically geared to favor musicians and photographers and graphic ...


6

It's all about practice and experience. You have to train your ears, you have to know your tools. Producing is not the same as mixing or mastering, some skills overlap but they need mostly different skill sets. There are tools and techniques that will help you judge the frequency balance of a mix. You might eventually not need them at all, though some of ...


6

One simple "technique" can improve your solo recording drastically: whenever you start recording a song, begin with recording a guide track. This is a track where you sing the song, accompanied by a rhythm instrument such as an acoustic guitar or a piano. You don't need to play or sing everything right in this track, but it's important to get the rhythm ...


5

One thing that no one has mentioned yet (I think) is the audio driver. On Windows, to get multiple audio drivers you either need to use the windows driver, which in general doesn't work very well with DAWs, has more latency and limited multi-device options, or use ASIO4ALL which allows you to combine the inputs into one device and work with low-latency, at ...


4

I can't tell you what might work best for you to reduce the amount of time you are spending on your recordings. But I can tell you what works for me. Before I am ready to record a demo of an original song, I have carefully written a lead sheet with lyrics and chords and practiced playing the song and singing with it as if I were performing it solo. Once ...


4

Sometimes called 'double tracking'. The single vocalist sings another track, virtually identical to the original, and that's put onto the recording as well. It may be slightly quieter than the original, but still comes out like unison singing. The phrasing needs to be pretty close, though, with plosives together, but things like the vibrato slightly ...


4

A DI box converts a high impedance, unbalanced signal to a low impedance, balanced signal. If plugging a high-impedance electric guitar output into a mixing board, then unless the board has dedicated high-impedance inputs, you'll want to go via a DI box. In your case, with the keyboard, the outputs are already (probably) low impedance, though they are ...


4

There is no blanket answer to your question. It depends. "It depends" isn't very useful though, so let's try to dive a little more into it. Advantages and disadvantages Generally speaking: Sample: Less complexity, less flexibility. Synthesis: More complexity, more flexibility. But it's not that simple, and the weight of those cons and pros depend on ...


4

One old technique for this is to copy the track or tracks, invert the phase on each and apply a high ratio compressor to the inverted track. When you mix the treated tracks with the originals, the parts that were left by the compressor will cancel out. See De-Verb for Free: Removing Reverb using Free Plugins for a fairly good explanation of this technique. ...


4

You will not learn any faster using the ultimate package. If anything, you may find it slower, as there are more options. As an artist, most of those options will never be necessary for you. Even some studios I work with never go near some options. Start with the cheaper version - it's what I use at home, as does the rest of my band. We only use the full ...


3

After listening to the example mix, I have a few specific comments: there's a very strong likelihood that the monitoring is deficient. It is likely very hyped in the high end, and probably has a big hole in the low mids. It's likely that you mix very loud. Your mixes have a preponderance of very broad-band "large" synths, stacked on top of each other. ...


2

The best technique I've come across for making each instrument clear and audible in the overall mix is to do your mixing in mono. First, pan your instruments to where you want them in stereo because the pan law can affect the volume of the instruments. Then once you have your instruments panned to where you want them, use the "mono" button on the master bus ...


2

When should I use one over another? The big advantage of using samples is that it's easier to make your hits sound like real instruments. If you sample a snare drum, and use that sample, it will sound more like the real thing vs. a synthesized snare hit, which will more likely sound synthesized. One disadvantage of samples is they may need to be ...


2

Are you recording "live" or building up the song track by track (perhaps in the mistaken idea that that's the "professional" way to do it?) Can the violin player hear the singer while playing her part (and is she LISTENING?) When good musicians are playing sensitively, very little "mixing" will be needed. A real stereo recording could be great - put the ...


2

You can try through several mics and see what difference they make in the presence of the singer. Working with equalizers, however, results in "unnatural" sound. While microphones also influence the frequency response, they do it in a pretty consistent manner. But it sounds like what you are basically trying to do here is putting lipstick on a pig. A ...


2

As a beginner you'll have enough to learn with only the Artist version. You can cross-grade at any time you feel you're out-growing it.


2

The technique is called "overdubbing" and it's been used since the early days of recorded music. The technique is almost 100 years old. Wikipedia article on Overdubbing.


2

The two particular things producing that sound are, 1) very close miking, and 2) very quiet singing. It's almost like someone whispering in your ear - you hear just as much breath and lip sound as you do vocal chords. I too love this sound. When you have someone sing very quietly you will usually find that the dynamic range is extremely wide. It's almost ...


2

Touring bands with a large budget and an elaborately produced show can have an entire production crew consisting of a production manager and a stage manager and a lighting manager, a video manager a sound manager and many more. The production manager would coordinate with the lighting manager and sound manager to be sure the "show" goes as planned. They ...


1

The only difference between using a Mac versus a Windows computer is that with a Mac you can run Apple OS X which is required for a very few pieces of software that some musicians really like, and Windows is required for a few other packages and Windows is more affordable when purchased with a Windows computer. Particularly, I would say Apple Logic Pro and ...


1

From another form of music performance: Occasionally an orchestra conductor will chat with the audience about an upcoming piece. The conductor may want to provide some background on the composer, or the events taking place (e.g., Shostakovich being ordered to write a wartime symphony to stir up patriotism) at the time of composition, etc. I recall one ...


1

Just a bit bout "Muddiness": Listening to your mixes (through good earphones), I can hear a bit of muddiness.. kind of.. "muddiness" .. obviously it's not a technical term but if I take it to mean indistinct and lacking in sharpness, almost like slightly blurred image .. Things that contribute to muddiness : Lack of very high end frequencies. ...


1

In order to make a vocalist stand out in the mix, you need to do the following: Use a Compressor on the vocal track, with a hard compression ratio. This is realy an essential step in any vocal track. Just be sure to also put a Noise gate to eliminate the parts where the singer is quiet. EQ on the vocal track: using good reference speakers, it is your ...


1

Here's what I woud try : 1) Eq - if you can reduce the more piercing tones of the violin (upper midrange?) it'll allow the voice to prod through a bit. This is probably simplest to try if you have parametric eq on your mixer. 2) Panning violins to each side - as Todd Wilcox suggested this can result in the violins still being 'in the mix' but the vocals ...


1

Along with filtering, EQ, and reverb (in reverse order of priority for the folk genre, probably) there is a pretty good way of creating the kind of separation you're looking for, if you aren't afraid to possibly lose some of the string 'body' if the mix ever gets played through a monaural audio system. First, copy the competing string part to two tracks ...


1

Something is sitting where vocals should be. You have to find out what it is for each part of the song. Try muting every suspect and combinations of them until you find out what is your problem. Now, for each section of the song, you must know why there is a problem. You can see mixing as organizing sound into a 3D room where the 3 axis are Panning (sides), ...


1

You can try with de-reverberation programs. There has been a lot of progress in the area, so these programs can achieve pretty good results. Some options are: Zynaptiq Unveil Izotope RX3 Acon Digital DeVerberate Vocal Dereverberation


1

Put generally, EQ in front of a compressor will change the way the compressor engages. This might be a good thing! Say you have an acoustic guitar track that's got some rumble in it. You put it through a comp->EQ and you're fighting it all the way. You put it through a high-pass EQ first to take the undesirable LF away first, and you get a far more ...


1

The missing piece in your mixing arsenal and gear is called sidechain ducking or sidechain EQing. If you learn and know how to use these audio processors, you can take any mix with as many instruments in it and make them all heard properly. If you still want to use the old traditional way of adjusting volume and EQ, here are a few tips: Use compressors. ...



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