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1

Try to be a composer before being a mixer. A good composer doesn't write close-position chords in the low range of the piano - because they sound muddy. He doesn't have several instruments, particularly ones in the same frequency range, playing similar but not identical things - because it sounds messy. He LEAVES ROOM so that what he wants to be heard, is....


7

Matthew has provided a great answer. I want to expand a bit and look at different aspects of your question to help with some misconceptions that might be causing trouble. I would take a professionally produced song with a similar set of instruments that my song uses (or genre) and compare the frequencies through the voxengo span vst... ...Even though the ...


6

equal looking frequency spectrum's do not mean that the sound will be perceived similarly. Dynamics, instrument separation, clashing tonal centers, there are a myriad of things responsible for how a mix is perceived that don't get translated to a frequency analyzer. (i use the same plugin too). instead, use your ears to check if the mix is sounding the way ...


8

There are some particular design features that are often used in monitor speakers with the objective of making them "sound accurate" rather than "sound good". They often have built-in amplifiers, to eliminate differences arising from the different performance of external amps - not only their frequency response as measured by the amplitude of the output, ...


5

'Monitoring' is listening to audio that is at some kind of intermediate stage of production, rather than being 'the final result' that the 'consumer' or 'audience' listens to. Studio monitors are something you use to listen to individual tracks, or the mix, as the recording / production process is going on. (Equally, a stage 'monitor' is a speaker used on ...



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