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6

It's all about practice and experience. You have to train your ears, you have to know your tools. Producing is not the same as mixing or mastering, some skills overlap but they need mostly different skill sets. There are tools and techniques that will help you judge the frequency balance of a mix. You might eventually not need them at all, though some of ...


1

Here's what I woud try : 1) Eq - if you can reduce the more piercing tones of the violin (upper midrange?) it'll allow the voice to prod through a bit. This is probably simplest to try if you have parametric eq on your mixer. 2) Panning violins to each side - as Todd Wilcox suggested this can result in the violins still being 'in the mix' but the vocals ...


2

Are you recording "live" or building up the song track by track (perhaps in the mistaken idea that that's the "professional" way to do it?) Can the violin player hear the singer while playing her part (and is she LISTENING?) When good musicians are playing sensitively, very little "mixing" will be needed. A real stereo recording could be great - put the ...


0

Along with filtering, EQ, and reverb (in reverse order of priority for the folk genre, probably) there is a pretty good way of creating the kind of separation you're looking for, if you aren't afraid to possibly lose some of the string 'body' if the mix ever gets played through a monaural audio system. First, copy the competing string part to two tracks ...


0

Something is sitting where vocals should be. You have to find out what it is for each part of the song. Try muting every suspect and combinations of them until you find out what is your problem. Now, for each section of the song, you must know why there is a problem. You can see mixing as organizing sound into a 3D room where the 3 axis are Panning (sides), ...


2

You can try through several mics and see what difference they make in the presence of the singer. Working with equalizers, however, results in "unnatural" sound. While microphones also influence the frequency response, they do it in a pretty consistent manner. But it sounds like what you are basically trying to do here is putting lipstick on a pig. A ...


12

Well this is a big question, so let me start with a big answer: http://www.amazon.com/Mixing-Secrets-Small-Studio-Senior/dp/0240815807/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1426508544&sr=1-1&keywords=mixing+secrets Now for the smaller answer more approriate to this format. A good mix starts with the arrangement before you even record. If the ...


-1

Perhaps mixing it as a stereo recording with vocal and violins slightly panned would help - I don't know if this is a common technique though.


0

A basic first step would be to use filters/EQ to cut off the voice frequencies with the conflicting instruments (and maybe a bit of the low ones of the voice). Just try it with basic high/lowpass filters and you will see in a few minutes if this helps. If it does you can take more time to finetune it so as few frequencies are cut off as possible and still ...



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