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27

Collective improvisation doesn't mean "everyone plays at the same time". Playing jazz is as much about listening as it is being able to play your instrument. In that kind of situation, a player isn't thinking about "what should I play next", but rather "what is the music, at this moment in time, missing that I can provide?" Cacophony is more likely to ...


17

Types of connector Acoustic instruments, of course, don't have any kind of electrical audio output. For these you need a microphone. For the purposes of this answer, a microphone is just another instrument. Electric instruments have a socket in them through which an audio signal is output. There are various kinds of connector: 3.5mm phone -- the same form ...


15

"Worth the money" is very subjective. Let's instead talk about the various factors you have to consider. Fitting A into B Good quality microphones usually have XLR connectors. These have three wires arranged so that any interference picked up in the cable is cancelled out. Many USB audio interfaces have XLR sockets (but check that the one you choose ...


13

I know exactly what you mean and I've thought about it quite hard myself. Not everyone can do this, but as you attune to music more and get used to what a drum kit or guitar playing in a room sounds like, it's easier to pick out the characteristics of live vs. recorded. I think it's a mixture of things: The mix- sometimes live music isn't mixed as well ...


13

There are two terms for this technique: overdubbing and multi-track recording. These techniques are not new, and they are used on practically all music recordings everywhere all the time. These techniques are not only used for vocals; they are used for all musical instruments, and for sound effects in video and films as well. It is safe to say that ...


12

There are many, many scenarios here, but I will cover a couple of basic ones to get you started. When recording an acoustic guitar, you in essence three options. I'll enumerate those, and then go through some basic questions to hopefully get you moving. Use an Acoustic/Electric guitar and plug it into a recording interface of some kind. Mike an Acoustic ...


11

Well, there are a few options, but there are considerable limitations. First, copyright. The instrumental backing tracks for popular music are usually the property of the producer or record label, so finding these on the internet for free is of questionable legality. Some labels do provide licensed CDs for exactly the purposes you require (or karaoke, ...


11

Music is a performing art, and a performance is not (should not be) an acoustic "printout" of the score. Each performer gives each piece's performance his/her own personal touch, timing, energy, and interpretation. Each recording environment (be it a studio, or specific concert hall) affects the character of the performance. I'm not saying that every ...


10

There are two (popular) types of microphones: dynamic microphones and electret/condensor mics. Dynamic microphones They work like a speaker in reverse. Sound moves a diaphragm/coil assembly. The coil moves over a magnet and a current gets induces. Hence we have voltage. Almost indestructible. YOu can literally pound nails with a Sure SM58 (fun abuse ...


10

Same way a string quartet does, or for that matter A Far Cry does: body motion and eye contact. Further, even a free-form jazz ensemble rehearses a lot, and the members have a pretty good idea who's next up for a solo, and how many choruses are going to be taken, etc. Miles Davis' famous "play it and I'll tell you what it is later" doesn't really ...


9

It's actually pretty easy to remove just vocals from a track with something as simple as audacity. Most modern songs have just the vocals panned hard center (everything else is slightly to the left or the right. import into audacity. to the left of the window, there's the name of the track you just imported, just above where it tells you the info for it ...


9

I think that you probably mean "whinnying" of a horse. With brass instruments, it's typically done with a valved instrument, such as a trumpet or a tuba (or valve trombone if you have one.) The sound is typically produced by pressing the valves halfway down and either shaking the instrument (in the case of a trumpet) or by making a very wide vibrato. ...


9

For windows: The bare-bones way is to use the microphone or the line-in. I found the line-in to be a better choice, but either way, you need to reduce the amplifier volume to avoid clipping. This volume level will be pretty low, and it is specific to your equipment. After you adjust the amplifier volume, you can then adjust the overall volume on the ...


9

The simplest way to do a guide track, is simply to record the vocals for a song, along with one accompanying instrument (maybe guitar or piano). These parts don't need to be recorded well enough to be used in the final recording, but they would need to follow the same structure (length of sections and order of sections). These parts can then be recorded ...


8

There's a couple of things you can try: Angle the microphone a bit downwards. This shouldn't affect the sound too much (which largely depends on the horizontal position, not so much on vertical angle) but slightly reduce the breathing loudness. Use another polar pattern, figure-8 or at least supercardoid. These of course sound notably different (but not ...


8

Since another member of your team has achieved a suitable tone, I would try to analyze the situation by starting to a/b aspects of what he/she did with what you did. Experiments like: You play your part through his/her rig, Using the other guitar as a reference, try to match the tone with the pickup/tone/volume controls on your guitar. Compare the ...


8

I would focus on hardware, not so much on software. Get a decent digital audio interface; you can find some for under $200 USD. You can use pretty much any recording software, such as Audacity which has already been mentioned. I use an Alesis io|2 for example; very simple, just 2 analog channels, midi in/out, and connects to my laptop via USB. With this ...


8

I recommend going to see a live performance, preferably by renowned musicians, and looking for clues. You will see people tremendously listening to each other. You will see glances exchanged, smiles, frowns, astonished faces (if they are good, mostly good astonishment). Keep in mind that the tunes have been reheased before hand, that some groups have been ...


8

Seems that you are new to the whole synthesis thing and you are looking for specific sounds found in other songs, so I recommend you to start with a software synthesizer that has a big and good library and macro support/dynamics. The library will let you choose from an array of well-organized pre-programmed sounds, and the macros will let you tweak those ...


7

I really think you should ask them. There's no point busting a gut to transcribe your parts to a score, only to find out that your musician prefers picking things up by ear. Likewise there's no point just giving an MP3 to a musician who can't play by ear and needs the notes written down. Different musicians think in different ways. The only way to find ...


7

Audacity can do this. It's free on Windows, Mac and Linux. Load the audio file. Select-All (ctrl-A). Choose "change pitch" from the "effects" menu, and you will be presented with a range of options. This adjusts the pitch independently of the speed, with some loss of quality. The "change speed" option in the same menu will affect both speed and pitch, ...


7

Honesty? Any way you want, any way that sounds good to you. That said, there are a couple of tried-and-true techniques. For live performance, you can't do much better than a simple Shure SM-57 in front of your best-sounding speaker, maybe off-axis if you prefer that sound. 57's sound great and handle the bumps and bruises of live gigs exceptionally well. ...


7

I think that the differences you mentioned have more to do with the size of the groups involved than their preference for classical or rock music. Also, I'm willing to wager that there is as much diversity in terms of goals among members of the same category (rock or classical) as there is between the two. You mentioned orchestral music, but that is only a ...


7

Having faced this issue some times, the best reccomendation i can give you is first of all, listen to your recordings in various systems, the more, the best, because if you want the world to listen to it, you can never test every system in the world, so, try as many as you can and try to balance for the best in all the systems. Particularly, one of the best ...


7

When using an amp with microphone, it means that you play the guitar through a physical amp, and using a microphone to direct this sound into your recording system. An amp simulator is software that literally simulates an amp; you plug your guitar into your computer (through an interface for better quality), and this sound is modified by the software that ...


7

The answer is: It depends. A good amp connected to a good cab in a good room will sound good through a well placed good mic connected to a good preamp. I don't believe that any amp sim can beat that yet. But that's a lot of variables, many things can go wrong, it's not very hard but certainly not trivial. To me, a good amp simulator sounds way better than ...


7

It's called pop filter, pop shield, or anti-pop. It protects the microphone from things like fast moving air and saliva. Its main function is to attenuate the aspirated plosives of the singer, which can produce noise and strong ugly transients.


6

This is my understanding, and different musicians are different, but it's my understanding that when acoustic instruments are recorded, they are recorded acoustically and are recorded in stereo, by which I mean two mics, pointed in two different places to get two different kinds of sound. I don't mean that they're split in the mix, left and right. There are ...


6

This isn't limited to just Japan, its often the case that record companies and bands issue slightly different releases of the same album, dependant on country. So some countries might have a slightly different track listing and or some B-Sides or a couple of extra tracks. This used to happen a lot between the US and the UK as record companies adjusted ...



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