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34

Wave is an uncompressed or lossless format, whereas MP3 is compressed or lossy. Technically .wav is just a container format and can hold various types of compressed or uncompressed audio, but typically you'll see it containing LPCM uncompressed audio (the same as on audio CDs). With .wav files, you are essentially getting a raw bitstream representation of ...


27

Collective improvisation doesn't mean "everyone plays at the same time". Playing jazz is as much about listening as it is being able to play your instrument. In that kind of situation, a player isn't thinking about "what should I play next", but rather "what is the music, at this moment in time, missing that I can provide?" Cacophony is more likely to ...


22

A balanced setup prevents electro-magnetic interference from corrupting an audio signal, such as one going between a microphone and a preamp, for example. Cables themselves are not balanced, but an audio signal carried by a cable might be balanced. Cables which carry such signals normally have three conductors. Microphone cables are a typical example. The ...


21

Types of connector Acoustic instruments, of course, don't have any kind of electrical audio output. For these you need a microphone. For the purposes of this answer, a microphone is just another instrument. Electric instruments have a socket in them through which an audio signal is output. There are various kinds of connector: 3.5mm phone -- the same form ...


21

Before trying any effects at all, I should change that mic if I were you. The SM58 is an amazing live mic – not just because it's dead sturdy, but also because it has a very focused, direct, "shallow" sound. Great to make vocals come out in a live mix and to avoid feedback and other common trouble – but none of these benefits have any relevance for a studio ...


16

This is a really broad question, so I'll touch on all the parts only briefly. The assumptions I'm making are: by complete beginner, you mean a beginner at recording, not playing piano you want to make a high quality recording of an acoustic piano performance you want the recording to be digital The minimum components you need to do this well are: a ...


15

"Worth the money" is very subjective. Let's instead talk about the various factors you have to consider. Fitting A into B Good quality microphones usually have XLR connectors. These have three wires arranged so that any interference picked up in the cable is cancelled out. Many USB audio interfaces have XLR sockets (but check that the one you choose ...


13

I know exactly what you mean and I've thought about it quite hard myself. Not everyone can do this, but as you attune to music more and get used to what a drum kit or guitar playing in a room sounds like, it's easier to pick out the characteristics of live vs. recorded. I think it's a mixture of things: The mix- sometimes live music isn't mixed as well ...


13

There are two terms for this technique: overdubbing and multi-track recording. These techniques are not new, and they are used on practically all music recordings everywhere all the time. These techniques are not only used for vocals; they are used for all musical instruments, and for sound effects in video and films as well. It is safe to say that ...


13

No doubt both are used, depending on circumstances. Having done some recording in both styles (sequenced/synthesized and live-performance) even with my mediocre performance skills and low-quality hardware, I've still often found performing to be less-labor-intensive than sequencing (to my surprise). If you can find any random half-decent instrumentalist it ...


12

There are many, many scenarios here, but I will cover a couple of basic ones to get you started. When recording an acoustic guitar, you in essence three options. I'll enumerate those, and then go through some basic questions to hopefully get you moving. Use an Acoustic/Electric guitar and plug it into a recording interface of some kind. Mike an Acoustic ...


12

XLR connectors should be your preferred route, as balanced cables have a much lower noise level by their design - they are constructed such that noise induced by electromagnetic interference cancels itself out, whereas signal doesn't. If you want stereo, you need to use two cables. As you can see 1/4" has a Left and a Right, and XLR has a Left and a Right. ...


12

You should not use a pop filter when recording instruments, unless the instrument is air-powered and your mic is in the line of fire (and if that's the case, there may be better mic placement options). The pop filter is meant to be as aurally transparent as possible, but it is indeed an obstruction that you are introducing between the instrument and the mic ...


11

Well, there are a few options, but there are considerable limitations. First, copyright. The instrumental backing tracks for popular music are usually the property of the producer or record label, so finding these on the internet for free is of questionable legality. Some labels do provide licensed CDs for exactly the purposes you require (or karaoke, ...


11

There are two (popular) types of microphones: dynamic microphones and electret/condensor mics. Dynamic microphones They work like a speaker in reverse. Sound moves a diaphragm/coil assembly. The coil moves over a magnet and a current gets induces. Hence we have voltage. Almost indestructible. YOu can literally pound nails with a Sure SM58 (fun abuse ...


11

Music is a performing art, and a performance is not (should not be) an acoustic "printout" of the score. Each performer gives each piece's performance his/her own personal touch, timing, energy, and interpretation. Each recording environment (be it a studio, or specific concert hall) affects the character of the performance. I'm not saying that every ...


11

Try employing parallel compression. Here is a good article about it. Basically, you make a copy of your vocal track. Leave one copy alone and compress the other. That gives you the original loud transients plus a compressed version where the rest of the material is also louder. Sometimes, you'll see this described where the original has very fast or very ...


11

With bass guitar, you can often have a lot of success skipping the amp altogether and running the bass through a DI box directly into the mixing board. Or you can take a hybrid approach, where you record the direct signal from the DI box and the signal from a mic'd amp into separate tracks, and then mix the two together. The general idea here is that the DI ...


10

It's actually pretty easy to remove just vocals from a track with something as simple as audacity. Most modern songs have just the vocals panned hard center (everything else is slightly to the left or the right. import into audacity. to the left of the window, there's the name of the track you just imported, just above where it tells you the info for it ...


10

Same way a string quartet does, or for that matter A Far Cry does: body motion and eye contact. Further, even a free-form jazz ensemble rehearses a lot, and the members have a pretty good idea who's next up for a solo, and how many choruses are going to be taken, etc. Miles Davis' famous "play it and I'll tell you what it is later" doesn't really ...


10

The simplest way to do a guide track, is simply to record the vocals for a song, along with one accompanying instrument (maybe guitar or piano). These parts don't need to be recorded well enough to be used in the final recording, but they would need to follow the same structure (length of sections and order of sections). These parts can then be recorded ...


9

I think that you probably mean "whinnying" of a horse. With brass instruments, it's typically done with a valved instrument, such as a trumpet or a tuba (or valve trombone if you have one.) The sound is typically produced by pressing the valves halfway down and either shaking the instrument (in the case of a trumpet) or by making a very wide vibrato. ...


9

Since another member of your team has achieved a suitable tone, I would try to analyze the situation by starting to a/b aspects of what he/she did with what you did. Experiments like: You play your part through his/her rig, Using the other guitar as a reference, try to match the tone with the pickup/tone/volume controls on your guitar. Compare the ...


9

For windows: The bare-bones way is to use the microphone or the line-in. I found the line-in to be a better choice, but either way, you need to reduce the amplifier volume to avoid clipping. This volume level will be pretty low, and it is specific to your equipment. After you adjust the amplifier volume, you can then adjust the overall volume on the ...


8

There's a couple of things you can try: Angle the microphone a bit downwards. This shouldn't affect the sound too much (which largely depends on the horizontal position, not so much on vertical angle) but slightly reduce the breathing loudness. Use another polar pattern, figure-8 or at least supercardoid. These of course sound notably different (but not ...


8

I would focus on hardware, not so much on software. Get a decent digital audio interface; you can find some for under $200 USD. You can use pretty much any recording software, such as Audacity which has already been mentioned. I use an Alesis io|2 for example; very simple, just 2 analog channels, midi in/out, and connects to my laptop via USB. With this ...


8

I recommend going to see a live performance, preferably by renowned musicians, and looking for clues. You will see people tremendously listening to each other. You will see glances exchanged, smiles, frowns, astonished faces (if they are good, mostly good astonishment). Keep in mind that the tunes have been reheased before hand, that some groups have been ...


8

Seems that you are new to the whole synthesis thing and you are looking for specific sounds found in other songs, so I recommend you to start with a software synthesizer that has a big and good library and macro support/dynamics. The library will let you choose from an array of well-organized pre-programmed sounds, and the macros will let you tweak those ...


8

It's called pop filter, pop shield, or anti-pop. It protects the microphone from things like fast moving air and saliva. Its main function is to attenuate the aspirated plosives of the singer, which can produce noise and strong ugly transients.



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