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1

This article about the "Exciting Compressor" explains a technique that really pumps up any vocal part. If you use a SM57 or SM58 specifically, here is a little non-invasive modification you can do to your mic that supposedly does miracles. You could also achieve the effect the variable impedence on a PreSonus Eureka preamp.


0

Pro old school engineer here! Still recording many hit artists Some nice comments. SM58 is a great mic, did you know almost ALL the vocals on all of SHED 7's albums was an SM58! It is how it is mixed. I would favour a high pass filter and lift the bottom end until it sits in the mix. And as suggested! the better the reverb the better the spacing and image. ...


1

A little bit of chorus or double-tracking the vocals (singing the same line two or more times and then mixing the takes) can do wonders for a vocal track.


0

I know you wanted to avoid it, but it sounds like any solution may be far more trouble than its worth, so just go with a click on the actual loop. But if you definitely want it in sync with the internal click I would try these out... Use a midi out from your drums, set its clock to master. Midi in to your DAW, set clock to external. Set the bpm you want ...


2

Former sound-guy here. Here's how it was done ca. 20 years ago: Quality condenser mic in neutral / near dead room. Neuman preferred Quality mic pre-amp Parametric EQ. add splash of treble, cut down bass, control clarity with mid-tones Aphex Multiband compressor with de-ess engaged to boost dynamics BSS 822 or similar sonic maximiser, make it 'deeper' ...


2

The SM-58 is a more-than-capable microphone which has been used on countless studio recordings. The key issues preventing you from getting a lively sound are probably as follows: You are using a USB audio interface - these range GREATLY in quality. Most A/D converters in them are relatively poor from an audiophile standpoint. If you get a higher end one ...


3

I like to use an analog pre-amp which adds harmonic distortion to an otherwise "cold" sounding digital recording. It adds body but could also sound muddy. You could eq out some of the tones giving it a muddy sound. Run an out into the pre and run it back into your recording setup. You could use 2 audio tracks - clean one and pre-amped one - and adjust the ...


2

For lead vocals it is very standard practice for the singer to sing the song twice onto two parallel tracks. That alone adds significant richness the the vocal. Another thing I'll do requires a real-time compressor: set the threshold relatively low and the ratio fairly low. If you feed that to the vocalist monitor, he will have to put more power out to hear ...


21

Before trying any effects at all, I should change that mic if I were you. The SM58 is an amazing live mic – not just because it's dead sturdy, but also because it has a very focused, direct, "shallow" sound. Great to make vocals come out in a live mix and to avoid feedback and other common trouble – but none of these benefits have any relevance for a studio ...


11

Try employing parallel compression. Here is a good article about it. Basically, you make a copy of your vocal track. Leave one copy alone and compress the other. That gives you the original loud transients plus a compressed version where the rest of the material is also louder. Sometimes, you'll see this described where the original has very fast or very ...


7

One technique that works like magic is by splitting the vocals channel into multiple channels, panning each channel differently, and then applying a different equalizer to each channel. This creates a very subtle difference between what you're hearing in your left and right ear, which is what depth is all about. The difference can be made even more ...


5

The only answer possible is "it depends". It depends on what sound you're trying to achieve, it depends on the recording itself. In my experience, I drop everything below 600 Hz and above 5KHz. You may need to give a little boost at 2 KHz, which is the frequency of speech. Compression helps smooth the sound out in terms of volume but shouldn't affect the ...


6

The executive summary of Charles' very detailed answer is: Use WAV for recording and editing. Use your audio editor's native file format with references to the WAV files to keep disk space under control use MP3 for distribution. 44.1 and 160kbps is lots, unless your audience has a home stereo that is worth more than their car and ears to match.


6

If you use a short length cable (for Home Studio use), it won't really change much. Using balanced cables is good for long cables (10 meters long, on stage), but just for a 2-meters-cable connection : piano <--> audio interface the difference will not be important. I such situations, I go for 1/4 JACK because it's simpler for home studio use. ...


12

XLR connectors should be your preferred route, as balanced cables have a much lower noise level by their design - they are constructed such that noise induced by electromagnetic interference cancels itself out, whereas signal doesn't. If you want stereo, you need to use two cables. As you can see 1/4" has a Left and a Right, and XLR has a Left and a Right. ...


34

Wave is an uncompressed or lossless format, whereas MP3 is compressed or lossy. Technically .wav is just a container format and can hold various types of compressed or uncompressed audio, but typically you'll see it containing LPCM uncompressed audio (the same as on audio CDs). With .wav files, you are essentially getting a raw bitstream representation of ...


0

Uh, when I read about you shouting in your NT1A, I cannot but wince. The NT1A is a large diaphragm condensor with high accuracy and sensitivity. It's great for picking up stuff faithfully and from a distance with minimal noise. Which makes it a superb recording mic for, say, a Liederabend. Put it on a suitable gallows and record piano and singer from ...


2

I have a baby grand at home, and here's how I used to record it. Hardware: Windows Laptop Tascam US-122 $200 MXL 990/993 $100 Panasonic (monitor) Headphones Software: Windows Cakewalk Sonar 6 Producer Ed Tascam connects to a laptop with USB 2, then it has a two standard mic inputs. You plug the mics straight into the board. Windows and Sonar would ...


0

Recording and mixing are two different processes. Multitrack recording levels are very simple - turn the gain down until the "clip" light doesn't come on anymore. You adjust it for each piece, or each movement if one is Pianissimo and the other is more than Mezzo (either one). The idea is each track is recorded at maximum signal-to-noise, but without ...


1

Is this a one-off event, and you wish to re-use the equipment elsewhere, or do you want to do this almost daily in a room that isn't well isolated from outside noise? For the one-off, get decent microphones. Shure mics are nearly indestructible - we used to annoy the music department by carrying 6 in one hand and deliberately dropping them. AKG breaks ...


2

Some things to think about. 1) Get your piano tuned. It doesn't matter whether it's an upright or a grand since an out of tune piano will sound bad. 2) Yes, a grand piano is better, but a well placed audio device, with the lid opened on the upright can sound okay. 3) Invest in something like this: http://www.zoom.co.jp/products/ I have one of the ...


2

Distortion cannot be fixed after recording, you want to keep safely below it. Recording with too low volume will mean that the "noise floor" is amplified along with the useful data. Recording devices tend to have less than 16bit of usable data above the noise floor, so basically you have to juggle between an annoying level of noise and the risk of ...


6

trw gave you the professional version, so here's my amateur version: Most of the arts - music, photography, etc. - have a tendency towards diminishing returns. You can spend a little bit of money and get something decent, or you can spend a lot of money and get something slightly better, or you can sell your house and get something that is almost ...


16

This is a really broad question, so I'll touch on all the parts only briefly. The assumptions I'm making are: by complete beginner, you mean a beginner at recording, not playing piano you want to make a high quality recording of an acoustic piano performance you want the recording to be digital The minimum components you need to do this well are: a ...


1

Checking a mix on as many different systems as you can access is a good way of discovering the deficiencies of your mix room & learning how to compensate for them. Fixing the mix room EQ curves is a possibility - there are relatively cheap solutions such as ARC System 2 (Advanced Room Correction) [Edit] I just noticed the ARC 2 has some presets ...


22

A balanced setup prevents electro-magnetic interference from corrupting an audio signal, such as one going between a microphone and a preamp, for example. Cables themselves are not balanced, but an audio signal carried by a cable might be balanced. Cables which carry such signals normally have three conductors. Microphone cables are a typical example. The ...



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