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"Instrument noise" would be the term to use I think. The German term, by the way, would be "Nebengeräusche" (literally "secondary sounds") which is less easily confused with "music as such". This distinction may be important in cases like "Jericho" where the walls fell down due to the "main sound" of the instruments according to the biblical story. ...


3

The answer, and I am serious, is "noise". "Noise" is defined as sounds that do not create a repeating oscillating waveform, which is to say that they do not produce a pitch. All instruments have components of their sound that are types of noise. Many percussion instruments, including drums, produce more noise than waveforms with pitch, but percussion ...


3

Most DAWs have a function for this. It is called quantization. You can choose to quantize your performance to the nearest quarter note, the nearest eighth note, or the nearest sixteenth note. Consult your owners manual for instructions. Here are the choices in the Time Quantize function in Apple GarageBand for example:


1

For what you are doing, you probably want an external i/o with a mic preamp. You can get a reasonably priced one from an online vendor that has a single XLR input, phantom power, and an instrument line in. You will likely want a better microphone suitable for your application. At a basic level, a USB microphone would probably suit


2

From the comments you make it sound like you get unwanted noise picked up as well. Human spatial hearing in natural environments is rather good at sorting it out and ignoring it. That does not work when recording. My first attempts to record with high-quality low-noise equipment led to some frustrations. Listening to the monitored signal, I got puzzled ...


1

If what you need is a microphone, and the internal microphone is not giving you the results you want, you should just get a USB microphone.


4

The purpose of studio monitors is to mix recorded music. While one wants extremely accurate professional studio monitors which reproduce a broad frequency range, one also has to mix music in such a way that it will sound good on the kinds of inexpensive consumer-grade speakers and headphones that consumers have in their homes and cars. This is why one does ...


3

The harmonic contribution of the bass guitar is not at 27.5Hz. 27.5Hz is mainly shaking you up. Now there are organ pipes at those pitches with a strong fundamental and few overtones. But they are pretty vague musically without further context. The function of a bass guitar, most particularly an electric one, is different (which explains funk and slap ...


4

There's a difference between having a note or sound that is periodic at a given frequency (viewed in the time domain), and that note or sound having energy at that frequency (when thought of as a 'spectrum' in the frequency domain). It is actually possible to have a sound that is periodic at (say) 27.5 Hz without having any energy at all 27.5 Hz. In most ...


0

Your problem is likely the mic-in connection to the tape recorder: to have the right level for that, you'll likely need to attenuate your sound card output a lot just to have it reamplified again in the mic preamp. If that thing does not have a proper line input for recording, chances are that you could create one by plugging into the right place in its ...


0

You are probably feeding too little gain into the analog recorder. The best thing about analog tape is the dynamics-compressed sound and distortion it produces when you overload/saturate it. If you are used to digital recording, you think of 0 dB being the absolute ceiling, but in analog recording, 0 dB and above is where it gets interesting. So I ...


0

It sounds like you're using a MIC input to record from a LINE out. That's not ideal, as microphone inputs have a high gain. A LINE input to the cassette recorded would be better if it has one. Check that the bias setting of the cassette recorder matches that of the tape. If it doesn't have a control, then it was probably only designed to work with ferric ...


1

Magnetic tape was one of the first formats that allowed folks to easily record speech or music at home. Unfortunately one of the biggest problems with cassette tapes using the magnetic tape format was their propensity to produce prominent hiss. Here is a quote from Wikipedia article on "Tape Hiss": Tape hiss is the high frequency noise present on ...


0

Audacity has hiss/noise removal built in. Here is a simple tutorial video which shows how to use it:


4

I find that using an electronic drum kit to add live drums in a home studio recording a great way to go. First of all, a live drummer will give your recording a more organic flavor and feel - and sound "real" and less processed than strictly using a drum track or digitized samples. And although an acoustic kit properly mic'd can sound even more ...


3

If you don't already have the Alesis DM Lite, then buying mics will actually be the cheapest route. Micing a real kit will also give you the best results and speaking as an owner of an electronic kit for quiet practicing (Roland V-Drum)...there is no comparison, recording real drums is the way to go. I have the Red5 Audio RVK7 drum mic kit (£159...or $228 ...


0

Some USB interfaces that do provide phantom power (like this) cost not much more than your phantom power source. I think the overall quality may be better than using just a phantom power source and the built-in audio interface of your computer. If it is not a computer where you want to plug in your mic, check if it does not provide phantom power on its own. ...


0

A decent sound card will make all the difference: It will lower your noise floor It will improve sound resolution It should reduce latency It should give better input options (high impedance, XLR, Line-In, possibly Phantom Power etc) When listening, it should provide you with improved sound quality. My current M-Audio one (pretty old now) has 7.1 outputs, ...


0

These two things traditionally don't achieve the same goals; but most audio interfaces allow you to use phantom power (usually with a wall-wart adapter). One is for powering a microphone (for use live, radio, anytime a microphone is needed, etc.) and the other is for recording input from a microphone. If you get a USB audio interface you'll kill a few ...


0

You are pretty certain to outgrow a 1 channel power supply since most stuff you want to plug a condenser mic into with convincing results can power it anyway. So it's more of a stopgap device. Of course, with a USB (or other) interface you also put down a wad of money for a particular quality you are then tied into. My own approach would be to get a good ...


-1

Why not buy an "all-in-one" by getting an analog mixer of sufficient size with a Firewire interface? I seem to remember that recent Mackie Onyx models come with Firewire interfaces by default (on my own one, I have to take the recording outputs into my audio interface more or less manually) but I've also seen some Heath&Allen on eBay which had a USB ...


3

Shawn said it very well. To put it another way - if you want to record several instruments playing simultaneously (say a band) so that you can capture the live interaction, and later be able to edit those instruments individually, you will want to use an interface that is capable of recording each instrument on a separate track. Otherwise you will only ...


4

With a multiple input interface, you can record each input to its own track, so you have more flexibility in editing/mixing/mastering. If you go with a summed output from a mixer that is the only mix you'll be able to work with when it comes down to the mix down/mastering/editing. Also, in general, overdubs are pretty much only possible when each input ...


0

The headset picks up all mouth sounds, including the ones you don't want people to hear, like a sneeze, a cough, and the heavy breathing you didn't even know you make when you launch into a solo, burps, clearing the throat, mumbles, and in my case sometimes the whiskers in my beard scratch the windscreen. Other than that the headset follows well when you ...



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