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Okay so I looked into it and it seems what is annoying you is a delay that is in the chain of effects next to the instrument. Specifically in "jazz guitar clean", it is associated with the reverb knob control and if you turn it all the way to the left the delay should stop ringing. Now, since there are other effects in that chain, that you might want to ...


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USB microphones are great if you want to sit in front of your laptop computer and record e.g. a podcast. The integral simple "soundcard" is pretty much a utility item, so any quality issues are mostly down to how good the microphone is and how its pickup pattern, sensitivity and "sound" suit your needs. There are cheap USB microphones and quite expensive ...


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I looked into buying a USB mic recently, and have a few bits of information that add to the current answers. A well-designed USB mic has all the analogue electronics in the head unit. This means hum pickup should not ever be a problem. Some of the mics I looked at specified a maximum cable length between mic and computer of 3M. This is too short, as your ...


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Theoretically there should be no difference between a USB audio interface and a USB microphone if you used the same components in the mic as in a seperate mic and interface. (USB sends data in packets, Firewire sends it in a stream and so deemed more reliable for professionals) BUT you will find the professional level stuff is a rack mount audio interface ...


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The fact that you DI the guitar doesn't change the differnce between distorted single coils or humbuckers, so if you're thinking of getting a SG or Les Paul etc for nicer distortion, that'll still be the case if you DI. Strats have a nice clear kind of distortion wheras Humbuckers are better for pure grunt. I'm not sure of the science behind it but the ...


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Humbuckers give you more distortion because more is being pushed down the wire. On my humbuckers and my p90's I would estimate 30% distortion on my amp as its is about the same as 100% distortion with my p90's. But I would never need to put it above 75% for my humbuckers as its just noise. My p90's have a sharper, more piercing and clear sound. My ...


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The pickups aren't the only part of an electric guitar that affect the sound in noticeable ways. Construction of the body and the neck are high on the list, as are hardware items like the type of bridge, nut material, and so on. Even with just the electronics the specs of the tone and volume controls are a factor. If you like the previous work of the ...


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If you want the sound of a humbucker, you need to get one. Emulations using single coils will not do. Sure, you could play around with EQs and compressors and maybe get you in the ballpark, but it will always be noticeable. If you have to have only one guitar and want to get the widest range of sounds, your best bet would be humbuckers with coil split ...


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It absolutely makes a difference. You are actually going through an interface either way because the microphone has an A-D (analog to digital) converter inside of it, just like a dedicated interface does. There is also a preamp in there too, allowing the necessary 48 volts of phantom power for a condenser with chargeable plates like the NT1A to work. The rub ...


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The main difference is that a USB microphone is going to act as a single microphone input through your main audio routing while a separate interface will act as an external audio card and provide inputs and outputs. I can't speak to the USB microphones much as I've never used one, but generally going through the default audio mapping for studio-level ...


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If you wrote the song to have tempo changes then you had an artistic reason to make that decision which should overule all - so I certainly would not advocate locking it to one tempo. The best option for recording with a click and capturing the best performance is to go through and automate your click. This can be a lot of work but it's definitely worth it, ...


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Had you thought of buying studio time rather than studio equipment? Even if you were paying $50/h your $1500 would still buy you extended use of a decent well-maintained grand piano in a nice acoustic space, boutique microphones and, probably most important, someone expert who knows how to get the sounds you're after.


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A microphone certainly needs a preamp, to provide phantom power and to amplify the signal. But the preamp in your mixer or in your audio interface is probably just fine. A recent test in Sound on Sound magazine established that a variety of mic preamps, from utility-priced to boutique, unless set up to deliberately add distortion all sounded exactly the ...


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Back in the 60s, unless there was an instrument that couldn't easily be re-tuned, i.e. piano, organ, etc, featuring in the set, all guitars were tuned to each other, probably using the first one that was in tune. It wasn't that important, as long as everyone was at the same pitch. Occasionally a piano was used, and the band would have to tune to whatever ...


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Seems to me that the best type of pickup you can use for that is a piezo pickup. The type that you will attach to the cello (either on the outside or on the inside) and then you get from the piezo an electric signal that you can send to the looper effects pedal. There are multiple brands that offer piezo pickups, some are better some are worst, you should ...


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It's hard to put the condenser studio microphone (with stand) on a practical place. If you have a acoustic piano, the best option is a dynamic microphone because the condenser microphone also picks up the sound of the piano.



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