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"Soundfonts" are pretty old technology! But there's a wide choice of "virtual pianos" that work on any reasonably modern computer. Here's one supplier: http://synthogy.com/index.php/products/software-products/ivory-2-grand-pianos


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In principle you could make your own soundfont, by recording single notes (preferably using a MIDI file to "play" the piano, so you get consistent note-on velocity etc) and using soundfont editor. But the results are unlikely to sound as good as the piano, because you will lose the interaction between sound of different notes played together. Good quality ...


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A good piano synthesizer (as in the engine of a digital piano) should do more than just play back samples such as panning the notes according to pitch and adding sympathetic resonance for strings not being directly played. A simple MIDI player with sound fonts is unlikely to get the dynamics working as well as a dedicated piano synthesizer. If possible set ...


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From what I'm getting, you're connecting your Crate amp directly to your computer? As in 1/4" to mini jack or something? There is no external audio interface (like this) in play here, right? And the pick-up works correctly with your amp (as topo morto asked)? It seems to me that this is more an issue of getting the right gear. At first glance (I looked into ...


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Recording your guitar playing is an excellent way to improve your playing. Listening to a recording of yourself will highlight the areas you need to improve more effectively than just hearing yourself while playing. It is also a great way to share your music with others through many on line formats. Joseem gave you some great options. I know you are ...


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There are many possible answers depending on your budget and purpose. I'll lay out three basic Laptop PC with recording program. If you a have a laptop with embedded microphone, you may already have everything that you need, at least to start. Use a program like Sound Recorder (bundled with windows) or the opensource multitracking audio workstation ...


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You want to record your loudest volume part of the song just below the red peak level. I use the Tascam DR-05 for recording my piano. Using the just below peak level method gives me the same volume level of most all songs in my library. For adjusting the volume after recording as well as all kinds of other adjustments I recommend Audacity. Audacity is ...


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Yes editing takes in some manner has been and still is big part of the production of record music in nearly all musically genres. In the liner notes J.S. Bach Two- And Three- Part Inventions, It is written that Glen Gould confessed to the Columbia manager Ronald Wilford in 1973 "A good session will consist of 2.5 to 3 minutes of music per recording hour ...


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I am afraid I don't have reliable sources discussing modern professionals' editing practices. I can only share what I know from interacting with 2-3 professional pianists who have recorded a number of CDs. From what I gathered, yes, each track is typically the result of mixing a number of takes. Some musicians go to an extreme in literally splicing every ...


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One solution might be to take the volume of your band down to a level where you can practice just about anywhere without bothering anyone. Pick up a used electronic drumset, use amp sims for guitars/bass instead of amps, purchase a used mixer and a headphone distribution amp to run headphones to all your band mates so you can get the feeling of playing loud ...


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Most cities have rehearsal rooms, and most I have used have been very well soundproofed, so you may have just not found a good one. Hunt around - ask other bands where they practice. In city centres, practice rooms I have hired over the last 7 years have been anywhere from £20 for 3 hours to £50 for 4 hours, so not really a high cost. Aside from that, in ...


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Your entire signal chain into the DAW is mono, so any stereo effect you're having is coming from the DAW itself. I would check that the DAW does not have any sort of phasing effects, chorus, modulation, etc on a single channel (or both, if you also have it on your amp) which could cause phase cancellation on your audio source when played back with both ...


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What device is indicated by 1/4" audio to USB 3.0? Do you have some kind of audio interface? That is almost definitely where your problem lies. Rarely do devices have 1/4" stereo inputs, but your Line 6 has a 1/4" stereo output. You probably have to get a splitter cable that has a male 1/4" stereo (TRS) connector on one end, and then either two male 1/4" ...


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A sound example would be helpful here. In my opinion, you should record guitars always in mono, because mostly you will just have one mono signal (if you are working with one mic or a line in signal) If you want to have stereo, which is recommended, record two different tracks and set them to your left and right channel with a bit of variation in your amp ...



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