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2

Sounds like you are already somewhat familiar with Band in a Box. It will do exactly what you want - and the more up-to-date versions have "RealDrums", which are sampled snippets played by real human drummers on real drums that can be arranged into song tracks. They come in a variety of styles, with more being released every once in a while. Just mute the ...


2

Perhaps it's about the difference between a recital and improvisation - Classical musicians tend to have learnt to read music, and sight-read from that while playing. Rock musicians tend to play from memory or by ear. So I can see an argument that Classical is more about a recital, so fall into the description you give above, and some rock is more like ...


5

I think that the differences you mentioned have more to do with the size of the groups involved than their preference for classical or rock music. Also, I'm willing to wager that there is as much diversity in terms of goals among members of the same category (rock or classical) as there is between the two. You mentioned orchestral music, but that is only a ...


0

Since you'e not going to end up with piano in one channel and vox in the other, it's personal choice. Whichever way, you're going to end up with some piano and some vox in each channel. It will depend on things like how far apart the two are, whether the piano is much louder than the vox, what the acoustics of the room are like - bright, with sound echoing ...


1

Another big clue is the use of compression. Originally compression was used to fit the dynamic range to the limits of vinyl/shellac recording, but our ears are now so used to it, and it's used so routinely in recording, that uncompressed music sounds 'live' or even 'wrong' depending on context.


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@MrTheBard The amazing thing about mic placement is just how unpredictable it can be. I'm not kidding, the best snare sound I ever got (well, my drummer, actually) was from the mic of a laptop. I'm not suggesting this will always work, though, quite the opposite. It's always different. Try to have fun experimenting with as many combinations as you have time ...


3

I have been doing a simlar thing for my (rock) band quite a while, with good results. Our drum kit is simple : bass, snare, 2 x tom, hi-hat and cymbals. When recording for studio work, I use 7 mics : Bass, Snare(above - to get the drum note) and snare (below- to get the actual snare), Tom1, Tom2 and a pair of "overheads" above the kit, about 4 or 5 feet ...


0

If you're going to record each part separately ( a good move, recording wise), then two mics will do the job - record each instrument in stereo (two channel) and mix down at the end. For this, two mics will suffice, so I'd go for condenser mics that would need phantom power. For this, you'll need XLRs, so make sure two of these are available. You would use ...


2

If you only want to record the drums, it depends on what's kind of your drums. If you have standard drums with: snare, 2 toms, 1 floor toms, bass-kick, hi-hat, ride, and a crash, maybe you need 8 mics for drums. But, you said: I need to record drums, guitars, vocals, and bass. So, you need more inputs. Or maybe you can put the drums' mic into a direct-box ...


3

It depends on what kind of sound you are looking for. With two or three well placed mics, if you have the time and the ears to experiment a lot, you can get a pretty reasonable drum recording as good as anything that was recorded prior to the 70's explosion in tech equipment. I have been in many recording situations where we did just that for stylistic ...


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Here's my take on it in the form of a blog post: http://www.osirisguitar.com/three-ways-to-record-electric-guitars/


1

Is it an electric or acoustic guitar ? If acoustic : First is to get a reasonably microphone. this depends on your budget, and "you get what you pay for" right from a few tens of £ / $ up to hundreds or more. However there are two main types : Dynamic and Condenser. Dynamic microphones are generally good for picking up things relatively close by like a ...


0

First of all you need a good microphone. A decent microphone that is used a lot to mic amps is the Shure SM57. Loads of tutorials on Youtube describe how you should mic your amp. Then with the aid of the backing track in you headphones, you should record yourself. Afterwards put the 2 tracks together in your program (Fruityloops or ...).


0

While is definitely possible to use multiple USB microphones for recording multiple tracks at the same time, this setup is software dependent and may not be very trivial. Here there are some talks relevant to Audacity, for Garage Band you need to create a "composite device" as well. However may be attractive, as then you do not need a mixer of any kind as ...


2

It really depends on what type of quality you're looking for. I would highly suggest an audio interface with a good condenser mic, and possibly a pair of cardoid mics. The convenience of a USB mic is good, but audio interfaces are quite small and are not a hassle at all. It's better to record with the audio interface, because you can potentially record at a ...



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