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1

I have through trial and error, learned a few things about enhancing the audio for a video of myself playing guitar. And here is what I have learned. If you record the video and audio at separate times, it is very difficult to synchronize, even if you played to the same drum track each time or lip synced to the audio recording. I have tried to lip sync ...


1

For rerecording, start by clapping your hands once visibly at the start and the end of the recording. It's the cheap version of a clapperboard. It also makes sense to let the video camera record audio. It's pretty much guaranteed to be synchronous to the video and is thus perfect for realigning with the high quality audio recording. Just make double sure ...


2

Now you've asked a specific question, you can have a specific answer! Your yamaha mg124cx has its stereo main outputs arranged as a pair of balanced TRS 1/4" jacks. (The outputs are duplicated on a pair of balanced XLR sockets, which carry an identical electrical signal. But we don't need to worry about that for now.) Your Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 has ...


0

If it's a headphone cable, or a mini-jack cable connecting domestic equipment to a computer, a TRS connection may be stereo. In a home recording setup a 1/4" TRS plug will much more likely be carrying a balanced mono signal. In the pro world, you're probably see XLR connectors, one for mono, two for stereo. Point being, TRS is TRS. It isn't "stereo".


3

As I am sure you are aware - the TRS connector tip is capable of transmitting a stereo signal (separate left and right signal) from a stereo output jack to a stereo input. The output jack must be wired as a TRS output in order to route the separate stereo channels into the appropriate wires inside the cable. You will find this scenario on stereo headphones. ...


1

The M-Audio M-Track is a computer interface to allow you to input audio and instrument signals into your computer. The Digitech RP500 is a multi-effects processor for guitar - which also provides for input of the processed signal into your computer. The Digitech RP500 provides for the output to be summed as a mono signal and sent to a guitar amplifier, ...


5

TRS (Tip-Ring-Sleeve) is the name often given to the connector, rather than the cable as such, though of course they would usually be used with a 3-conductor cable. This could be used for stereo purposes, but it could also be used for other things : e.g. as a mono send/mono return for an insert effect (like a compressor on one channel of a mixer), or as a ...


4

Why would you think you need a Y-cable for this? Each of the M-Track's inputs is mono, so it's no use to feed them a stereo signal. If you tried this with an unbalanced input, like in a guitar amp, you'd get only the left channel from the Y cable, because only the tip of the 1/4" is considered: the ring is either left open, or even short to the grounded ...


0

I will explain below how to record the audio output from your Privia to your computer. But from the question, it appears that your goal is to produce a video, with a separate, clean audio track to go with the video. To do this, you will want to record both the video and audio - (with all the ambient noise and extraneous sounds you want to eliminate), ...


0

Your M-Audio USB A-D converter module should have come with the free version of Pro Tools (and possibly Cuebase). It should have some native effects, and there are 3rd party effects plugins that work with it.


0

At the most basic level, to record the direct output from a digital piano, it'll need a line out jack. You'll need to connect to some kind of audio interface on your computer, and then use a DAW (like Audacity, Garage Band, Reaper or others) to record the sound. For home recording, audio interfaces typically take in XLR or 1/8" plugs and connect to a ...


3

You need some sort of DAW on your computer, and an input device. I agree that you should not be going from the AUX output on your amp directly into your computer. I have an early version of the Line 6 POD (which you can now find used pretty cheap these days) and I love it for practicing guitar and not bothering anyone. I also have a home studio set up with ...


3

I would not recommend using the AUX output of your amp to record. Guitar > Guitar Cable > Audio Interface > Firewire > Laptop > (Guitar Rig Pro) > DAW..... Guitar rig pro / Amplitube are processing software that emulate amps and effects. Open it inside your DAW as a VST (and record it). This also gives you access to many amps for creativity purposes. As ...


3

I use a Behringer-ucg102 to connect my guitar to the computer, where the input is given to a track in my DAW(Reaper). The output can be heard by using the DAW's monitoring button for the track. I add another track which has the song/backing track on it. For guitar FX, I load the Guitar Rig/Amplitube VST for the track I'm monitoring. Now I can practice/record ...


2

There are many ways to accomplish what you want to do - silent monitoring with headphones and recording of your guitar on computer. The Line 6 Pod systems as mentioned by manejar are great. Another option that should work would be a simple audio interface such as this one PreSonus AudioBox USB which has two line inputs for guitar or mic, a headphone ...


2

I use a Line6 POD UX2, which plugs into my computer. I can plug headphones into it (via an adapter) or I can plug my amp into it. Then I use the free Line6 PodFarm software in which I can add FX and create tones for my guitar. That software doesn't record, but you can change the input on different software (I use Propellerhead Reason or Adobe Audition, but ...


0

Weighted action is easier to play as a piano. Unweighted is a great deal lighter to carry to a gig! (I think weighted is worth it!)


3

What I've found is that the acoustic piano is the most expressive when played softly. We all like loud, but anything can be loud and the ear will tune loud OUT after a while. But it pays attention when things get quiet. And that's where weighted keys really help - on a digital too. If you don't have that weight, you'll get a more frequent oops-BANG ...


2

Hammer action is noisier. Of course it is dwarfed by the sounds you hear, but when you have excellent reason for playing through headphones, that reason might also make light action desirable. Also if your main instrument is not a grand piano but a harmonium or accordion or organ, there is no point in an percussive attack, and it may detract from the fine ...


6

If you are playing an organ sound, you might want a keyboard that can feel and respond like an organ, rather than a piano It's possible to make a very shallow non-weighted action, which is helpful for some techniques (I like it better for triggering percussive sounds, for example) It's cheaper to make, so instruments are cheaper. The instrument is ...


0

Not quite sure exactly what you are asking (recording, live sound?) but as a guitar player who also is responsible for the PA for my band, and as a songwriter with an in- home recording studio - I have studied on this and experimented over the years. Here are some thoughts to consider. Different speakers are designed differently to do different things. ...


3

If we first simplify things to consider that the speakers are in an infinite space with no walls, floors or reflective surfaces, many of the things you mention have to do with, as you say, the amount of time the sound takes to get to the ear from each driver. Let's also pretend for a moment that people have just one ear! If you were to place two speakers ...


0

As Dom said in his answer - I would think that in order to do what you want to do - the output from each instrument would need to be converted to (or generated in) an independent MIDI file. Then you can have a separate "track" for each instrument that resides on it's own independent MIDI file. You might want to compose your own using software designed ...


0

You cannot separate instruments on anything but some midi files that are composed of multiple tracks. The reason is an audio file stores the "overall" audio data at for every sample. It does not separate the sounds nor is it possible to reverse that process once it's happened. So no to everything except some specific midi files. You will need separate ...


3

"Just for fun or getting feedback" -- don't attempt to mic the vocal and the piano separately. Mic the room. This is the only easy way to get a natural sounding recording. If you close-mic any instrument, you'll get a recording without any of the natural effects added by the room, and you'd have to compensate with artificial reverb, EQ and so forth. Studio ...


-1

the phase cancellation / comb filtering from using multiple mics is not worth the effort or the cost or the time if you are doing this just for fun. Not getting into it here but in short the combination of complex waves from the same source at two different points in time (distance and time are related) (the speed of sound 1 foot = 1 millisecond) when the ...


0

Our normal setup on the drum-kit in our church (a conference room holding up to 300) is: Kick drum Snare 2/3 tom 2 overheads, on stands placed either side of the kick Some times we don't bother with the overheads and I haven't noticed any problems.


1

For this, and the other recording you asked about, and obviously any future recordings you will be doing, a better solution will be to arm yourself with an extra mic. This may well involve a small mixer as well, but lots of gear = lots of fun. One mic is really too much of a compromise, but with two, balancing signals is a doddle.Proper mics will always give ...


1

The first thing to realise is that with an SM58 you're never going to get a great result. It could be good enough to post up on Youtube and not be totally embarrassing, but that's about it. As has previously been said, if you only have one mic to do both jobs then you need it to be a fair distance away, and an SM58 isn't designed to work like that. ...


1

There are microphones that have a pick up pattern specifically designed to pick up sound from a relatively wide area (the microphones used overhead to mic a choir for example) but the Shure SM58 is not one of them. The SM58 is designed to be a vocal mic for a single singer and the pick up pattern is configured to minimize the response to off axis sounds so ...


1

With a single mic, I'd put the mic at about (sitting) head height, and point it somewhat downwards of the singer from, say, 4ft or 1.3m away. But not with an SM58. That's a singer's mic intended to be used close to the mouth. A mixed singing/acoustic guitar performance with a single mic in that arrangement would rather ask for a small-diaphragm condenser ...


4

This is actually quite tricky to get perfect, as you have very different tonal characteristics, so all usual guidance is to use two mics, or a mic and a pickup. But if you have to, you can do it - because of course you can sing to an audience with an acoustic guitar accompaniment. The challenge is to work out for you what ends up loudest on the mix. If you ...


1

I'm assuming you already know how to record one single track? You first click the rec button in the track box and then click record in the transport bar. This is the same for most (if not all) DAWs. For multi-track recording you need to do the same, but in multiple tracks, before clicking record in the transport bar. Click the rec button of all the tracks ...



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