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16

The best way I've found to get bandmates to fix things is to record a performance, without their knowledge, and give them a copy at the next rehearsal. They do have to listen to it, of course. It takes a lot of the feeling of being criticized out of the equation.


13

I don't know about "best," but I have found Audacity a good, free, cross-platform audio editing solution. You can cut and paste, trimming your audio down to just the section you want. Then, you can export to audio output for use however you like. If you're still using CDs, you could just create a CD with rehearsal tracks this way; else load the audio on ...


13

Sounds to me like he's pushing his voice a lot harder to get over the band volume. In an acoustic situation, he's singing in a more relaxed way, but put all the instruments in, at a volume which is probably unnecessary anyway, and the sing becomes more of a shout. By turning up his mic a balance will partially be restored, (but his ears will still tell him ...


12

In my experience, it's best just to stop right when you notice the issue and address it immediately. If you are determined to continue without stopping, and your quick slash isn't enough to jog your memory, either stop conducting, letting your musicians continue, and actually write a note, or just don't worry about it. If you don't notice anything the next ...


9

In order to rehearse for maximum effect, we need to first identify the purpose of rehearsal and the objectives we seek to achieve. Here are the key things that group rehearsals should address: Collective practice up to a point where a piece can be performed as a group, Perfection of performance nuances, especially those that involve more than one ...


9

You say they're willing to learn, but do they understand what that means? Does the band have a director (or other person who is "in charge"), or does everything happen by consensus? Have they agreed that on this subject you are in charge? How do you spend your rehearsal time? Do you spend any of it on "technique" or "meta" stuff, or do you just rehearse ...


8

Craig, the other answers all address the possibility that his "singing nowhere near as good" is because he's getting drowned out by the other band members. There's another possiblity as well. If he sings very well by himself, accompanying himself, that doesn't necessarily translate into singing well with other people who are accompanying him. It's a ...


8

As I'm quite easily affected by alcohol and caffeine (being a lightweight and having terrible problems with focusing does that to you), I think I can add some stuff from my own experience here. The main thought to keep in mind is that this is different for each person individually, though. A dose that works for you may very well have an opposite effect for ...


7

I think you should concentrate on teaching you drummer first, because the drums is easiest to pick up the rhythm from. The bass is also important, but is sometimes hard to hear the beat precisely enough. The bass drum is the most important for keeping a steady beat. When that is in place, it will also be easier for the others to follow. If the guitar solo is ...


7

A suggestion for an exercise: Select a short passage of music of say four bars that involve everyone and has room for some conducting work in terms of dynamic or tempo changes. Go through it until everyone can play it without looking at the music. Then have everyone look at you, while playing that passage over and over again. Each time you do something ...


7

Raise the stands! Seen it a zillion times. The music stands need to be set high enough that the conductor's upper body is visible just above the top edge of the music. That way they can read the music AND receive visual input from the conductor simultaneously. The problem with having to "look up" is then you get lost when you look down again.


6

I agree with Tim. A lot of bands tend to crank up their instruments way too loudly which is unfortunate. Everybody wants to be heard. Vocals are crucial for a vocal based band and the band should really work on mixing. Things you can do are make sure that the Vocalist can be heard clearly over all of the other instruments, especially the lead guitar and ...


6

As part answer ( the rest later), the 'can't hear you' syndrome makes everyone turn up, and the listening is even more difficult. It should be possible - often is - for a band, just about any band, to be able to play without monitors. I've done without for a couple of years, at gigs up to 300 people, by keeping volumes down so everyone can actually hear. ...


5

I think that every piece of music deserves the best possible method of being prepared in a such a way that both the musicians and audience have a pleasing experience. Preparation includes time, rehearsal, and every member stepping up to meet the challenge including the conductor's interpretation so that the entire group is a part of the solution. If your ...


5

There are two things on the tuba that make it hard to play fast runs -- the valves and the pitch. The valves are big and have a lot of travel, and they have fairly strong springs. Moving them fast and accurately requires training your muscles as well as your brains. This requires practice. The low pitch of a tuba means there's a bigger time lag between when ...


5

@Matthew Read gave some good suggestions, to which I'll add: Try rehearsing the problem sections at a wide variety of tempos, particularly ridiculously fast (once the choir knows the section reasonably well). Unwanted tempo changes become habitual. One way to break that habit is to go much faster (or slower, if the problem is acceleration) than desired, ...


5

I have no experience in conducting, but I assume what works for your own instrumental performance will work here, too. When you're really in doubt, I would definitely try to record the performance and listen to it again when you can totally concentrate on it. You'll have more "space" to analyze and the next time you'll be more prepared.


5

I would say that the best way is to try to go through the whole piece at least once, marking each issue to address with a small but noticeable sign in the conductor's score (I would recommend a circle), so that later you can study each of them by its own, and with the proper musicians. Be careful, though. Don't fall into the trap of trying to correct every ...


5

If you are looking for something random and fresh, just type "jam track" in youtube search. Specify a genre, if you are looking for something particular: blues jam track rock jam track metal jam track jam track in C Tons and tons of them.


5

there are quite a few sites out there that can provide you with guitar backing tracks. For example, on http://www.guitarbackingtrack.com/top.php, you can get backing tracks for many, many songs. But I think you're searching more for style related backing-tracks. So these could be useful:* http://www.gitarre-spielen-lernen.de/forum/ftopic9419.html ...


5

Assuming that the volume level is what may be expected in a small rehearsal room with acoustic drums, one of the more effective solutions may be somewhat counterintuitive: get a pair of ear-plugs. Now, apart from reducing the overall volume reaching your ears (which is generally a good idea), ear-plugs will also filter out a lot of the more extreme ...


5

If you have Guitar Pro, you can download your favorites songs. Mute the guitar part and then export the resulting file to WAV. After that you can convert this wav to a smaller file, and voila, instant backing track. I do this and put the tracks in my Ipod which I can then plug into a solid state amp. Resources: Guitar Pro And one of the best site for ...


4

Other good sources are the heavy metal magazines, like Metal Hammer and Kerrang they have backing tracks on CD with each issue or available for download.


4

I can't speak to the psychological reasons or addressing them, but there are a couple things you can try that basically apply to all types of music. 1) Have the weaker members listen to and follow the stronger ones. Ensure they can hear them, of course; don't put them on opposite sides of the stage. The mediocre members will probably do well enough if the ...


4

The best way I've seen conductors solve this problem is by "changing it up" with their conducting. I've played in bands for a long time, and I've found nothing more effective. For example. In the middle of a piece, change the tempo. When a small percentage of the students actually catch what you're doing, they'll follow you. The others, when hearing that ...


3

It takes more time and effort, but seeing your potential future bandmates in action is the best way. It means that you may have to go to the venues that these folks play in, and I don't know if you're old enough to get into some of these places. If you are old enough, try not to get sucked in by the drink-your-face-off-at-the-open-mic scenario. You can see ...


3

For gigging live, there is a lot to be said for allowing the tempo to flow, and in general taking your cue from the drummer should be the general rule. Is it really upsetting you that much? In saying that, if he really can't keep time you have 3 options: give him a click track. teach him to stay in time get another drummer We use recorded drums as our ...


3

Lots of eye contact and body language is essential to an improv band and also creates a stronger bond


3

o add to Tim's excellent advice: If you can, find time to make time for a soundcheck. Don't practice during that soundcheck, don't bitch about late arrivals or whatever, all that is for some other time. Focus on who can hear what. Don't play whole songs, just a verse will do, then stop. Talk. Change what needs changing, then do it all again, until it's as ...



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