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13

Sounds to me like he's pushing his voice a lot harder to get over the band volume. In an acoustic situation, he's singing in a more relaxed way, but put all the instruments in, at a volume which is probably unnecessary anyway, and the sing becomes more of a shout. By turning up his mic a balance will partially be restored, (but his ears will still tell him ...


8

As I'm quite easily affected by alcohol and caffeine (being a lightweight and having terrible problems with focusing does that to you), I think I can add some stuff from my own experience here. The main thought to keep in mind is that this is different for each person individually, though. A dose that works for you may very well have an opposite effect for ...


8

Craig, the other answers all address the possibility that his "singing nowhere near as good" is because he's getting drowned out by the other band members. There's another possiblity as well. If he sings very well by himself, accompanying himself, that doesn't necessarily translate into singing well with other people who are accompanying him. It's a ...


6

I agree with Tim. A lot of bands tend to crank up their instruments way too loudly which is unfortunate. Everybody wants to be heard. Vocals are crucial for a vocal based band and the band should really work on mixing. Things you can do are make sure that the Vocalist can be heard clearly over all of the other instruments, especially the lead guitar and ...


6

As part answer ( the rest later), the 'can't hear you' syndrome makes everyone turn up, and the listening is even more difficult. It should be possible - often is - for a band, just about any band, to be able to play without monitors. I've done without for a couple of years, at gigs up to 300 people, by keeping volumes down so everyone can actually hear. ...


3

o add to Tim's excellent advice: If you can, find time to make time for a soundcheck. Don't practice during that soundcheck, don't bitch about late arrivals or whatever, all that is for some other time. Focus on who can hear what. Don't play whole songs, just a verse will do, then stop. Talk. Change what needs changing, then do it all again, until it's as ...


3

Lots of eye contact and body language is essential to an improv band and also creates a stronger bond


2

If singing feels "high-impact," there might be some part of your vocal instrument that you are "over-handling." Singing should feel "low-impact" when done with proper technique. You should feel the resonance on your lips far more than anywhere internal. Aim to have speaking and singing feel the same. A voice coach is highly recommended.


2

There is nothing "wrong" with Booze or Coffee however, you might be able to do without either with nutritional supplementation. Coffee will dehydrate you, regardless of the benefits. So, if you're going to sing, you might actually damage your throat if you're dehydrated. If coffee is as noticable as you say for you, then booze really isn't the answer. Based ...


2

The answer, as you can tell from the above, is whatever works for you. The musicians in my band either drink beer or coffee depending on what they feel will work for them. Since they're all professionals and none of them are problem drinkers, it's not an issue for us. Sometimes I have a beer or a glass of wine to relax. Being in a relaxed state of mind is ...


2

I'm a guitarist and vocalist for a groovy rock band. When gigging, I quite often have a pint of lager (about 4-5% alc. nothing major) just to calm the nerves a bit. I find it works well and that strangely it also gives me a bit more energy, for an hour or so. Then I need to chug the water to replace what's lost in sweat. Bleah. When practicing, I never ...


2

One solution could be to find some more spazz-loving dudes/dudettes and freak out with them together with all the coffee you like. When that's out of your system you're probably more mellow with the other band. Side effect: some interesting music might be produced. Win-win.


2

I drank half a bottle of coke the other day (a big one) which led to a 4 hour session of music making. So I know where your coming from. Here are some things that help me. Lows are underrated, don't knock them. Just make sure you are generally eating and drinking well so you do have the energy I think what your describing is anxiety, so have a google of ...


2

I think you're approaching this with the right attitude of cautious attention to effects, one that can apply to almost any drug (except the really scary ones). The obvious next thing to try is half a cup of coffee. Or half-caff coffee. Disclaimer: I work for starbucks, so I want to help you find a way to keep drinking coffee, in some form. :)


2

If you really want to understand how alcohol and caffiene affect the body then you need to take into account a great many things, and need to consider them rather as a stimulant and a depressant. There's an interesting point about coffee that it makes you perform better than without it... but only if you're a regular coffee drinker. The reason for this ...


1

Great advice above, My preference is to start playing in whatever is a natural mode for you. You should try using your mind powers to get into the mood you want on the amped/mellow scale. Then after an hour or so of adrenaline and sounds pumping through you is a great time to have a puff or a drink. Extensive exercise can get you stuck in a mode and a ...


1

I'm a kale-smoothie drinkin' musician. Now that we have set the tone: When practicing at home (notice: NOT driving-yourself-home), when practicing at home I find that my self-listening is less stressed when taking some of those melty melatonin vitamins, 9mg to be exact, and it helps to practice before bedtime. Naturemade has 'em and calls them vitamelts ...


1

I recently got this advice that has been very useful to other bands with this same issue: include in your regular rehearsal schedule the practice of all songs without the vocals. Seems that one of the most common and important issues is a little too much dependence in the vocalist(s). Instead of counting, some people build a dependence on the vocals as the ...


1

Hey I'm also pretty new to singing and have aspirations of excellence. I've learned a few things and they have helped a lot. I would say number one before technique is to do it everyday. Your vocal chords are muscles and probably have not been properly exercised if you didn't sing when you were young like me. To deal with keeping your chords from ...


1

"A violin player plays very nice when he is playing by himself. If he is bowing while another player does the fingering, he's not half as good." "A dancer is dancing the steps of some figure very well by himself. When he is dancing with another..." A dancing pair is two beings moving with a common center of gravity and a common purpose. It takes a lot ...


1

This is a common problem both in the studio and when playing live. I'm surprised more guitarists / keys players aren't more switched on to this. Some (most?) amps are pretty directional so it absolutely does matter where you stand. Options : Amp stand (or rock the amp nbackward) so it points at your ears more, as Clay points out. "Feed each other" - ...



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