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15

The admonition I run into again and again, attributed to such lights as Thelonius Monk and Louis Armstrong is "play the melody." Of course you will syncopate it, put a little ornamentation here and there, but simple is fine That covers soloing pretty well, but what about comping? Guitarists with jazz chops rarely hang on the same voicing for more than a ...


8

One golden rule. Play less. Lay out. Leave space. If there's someone in the group who CAN play jazz, allow him room to do it. And have fun! Let the music go where it will. Don't rehearse it to death. If it's your turn to play a solo, the melody will be just fine.


8

As I'm quite easily affected by alcohol and caffeine (being a lightweight and having terrible problems with focusing does that to you), I think I can add some stuff from my own experience here. The main thought to keep in mind is that this is different for each person individually, though. A dose that works for you may very well have an opposite effect for ...


6

As part answer ( the rest later), the 'can't hear you' syndrome makes everyone turn up, and the listening is even more difficult. It should be possible - often is - for a band, just about any band, to be able to play without monitors. I've done without for a couple of years, at gigs up to 300 people, by keeping volumes down so everyone can actually hear. ...


5

In band rehearsal, the mix typically isn't really good anywhere in the room. And it needn't be, because since everybody has their own amp, there's very good spatial separation. Which is almost as useful as frequency separation for making everything audible. To fully exploit this, make sure everybody hears everybody else from a different direction, i.e. place ...


5

Most bands especially when they are starting out use one of their band mate's houses to practice. It will typically be at the drummers house since that is typically the hardest instrument to move. A little more specifically if they practice at a band mate's house rehearsal will typically be in the garage or basement as that is again typically where someone ...


4

Lots of eye contact and body language is essential to an improv band and also creates a stronger bond


3

As the only chordal instrument, you and you alone can play chords under the soloist. However, full-blooded chords may work well in blues/rock and roll, but only sometimes in jazz. The occasional number will benefit from nice 5 or 6 string chords - maybe arpeggiated, but since the bassist will be rooting and fifthing to a degree, you can find the other notes ...


3

Rehearsal studios are indeed a luxury. Different people have different circumstances, but the kind of solutions include: Homes / sheds / garages Back rooms/cellars/attics of shops/pubs/etc. School/church/community halls Offices after hours The street Barns/warehouses ... through a variety of legitimate and illegitimate means -- I'm sure there will be ...


3

Put the phone further away. Next step: pack it in soft foam (like slipping it in a sponge). But all that's pretty much piling on the bad. The sane thing is to just buy some roughly phone-sized recording device actually intended for the job. They are pretty affordable and will provide good practice feedback. They are no replacement for professional ...


3

o add to Tim's excellent advice: If you can, find time to make time for a soundcheck. Don't practice during that soundcheck, don't bitch about late arrivals or whatever, all that is for some other time. Focus on who can hear what. Don't play whole songs, just a verse will do, then stop. Talk. Change what needs changing, then do it all again, until it's as ...


2

If singing feels "high-impact," there might be some part of your vocal instrument that you are "over-handling." Singing should feel "low-impact" when done with proper technique. You should feel the resonance on your lips far more than anywhere internal. Aim to have speaking and singing feel the same. A voice coach is highly recommended.


2

One solution could be to find some more spazz-loving dudes/dudettes and freak out with them together with all the coffee you like. When that's out of your system you're probably more mellow with the other band. Side effect: some interesting music might be produced. Win-win.


2

I drank half a bottle of coke the other day (a big one) which led to a 4 hour session of music making. So I know where your coming from. Here are some things that help me. Lows are underrated, don't knock them. Just make sure you are generally eating and drinking well so you do have the energy I think what your describing is anxiety, so have a google of ...


2

I think you're approaching this with the right attitude of cautious attention to effects, one that can apply to almost any drug (except the really scary ones). The obvious next thing to try is half a cup of coffee. Or half-caff coffee. Disclaimer: I work for starbucks, so I want to help you find a way to keep drinking coffee, in some form. :)


2

If you really want to understand how alcohol and caffiene affect the body then you need to take into account a great many things, and need to consider them rather as a stimulant and a depressant. There's an interesting point about coffee that it makes you perform better than without it... but only if you're a regular coffee drinker. The reason for this ...


2

The answer, as you can tell from the above, is whatever works for you. The musicians in my band either drink beer or coffee depending on what they feel will work for them. Since they're all professionals and none of them are problem drinkers, it's not an issue for us. Sometimes I have a beer or a glass of wine to relax. Being in a relaxed state of mind is ...


2

I'm a guitarist and vocalist for a groovy rock band. When gigging, I quite often have a pint of lager (about 4-5% alc. nothing major) just to calm the nerves a bit. I find it works well and that strangely it also gives me a bit more energy, for an hour or so. Then I need to chug the water to replace what's lost in sweat. Bleah. When practicing, I never ...


2

I have heard of some storage locker units that will accept bands renting large units for practice space. Not all are band friendly however.


2

Practice hubs are available for a price. Provided the drummer has an electronic kit, they can work well. Everybody plugs in, vox uses a mic, and each player can have his own mix,in a pair of headphones, and deafen himself if he feels the need.I'm guessing that mains voltage is not necessary, so Slim's caravan idea, with a 12v battery would be good. Practice ...


1

I was guitarist in a 3-person jazz combo, with bass and drums. I played a lot of melody and two-part harmony, with chords very occasionally thrown in. A good bass player will keep it interesting. To the extent that worked, a sax/bass/drums combo would also work. So in that light, consider yourself icing on the cake and...add flavor.


1

You can often hire church halls or that kind of thing very cheaply. It probably depends on your music and looks though - a scary punk band might struggle more than a Christian worship group! But schools, churches, etc are worth approaching.


1

I don't know what skint means, but my band rents studio space once a week at $40 (USD) for two hours. Split amongst the three of us.


1

I agree with the answer above. In high school, my band recorded using a digital camera, and we put it in the closet. It was a bit muffled, but we could still pick out our parts. If you all plug into a mixer, I highly recommend that you plug in, line-in into a tablet or laptop. Now days, I use a usb condensor mic, plugged into my microsoft surface tablet. ...


1

Great advice above, My preference is to start playing in whatever is a natural mode for you. You should try using your mind powers to get into the mood you want on the amped/mellow scale. Then after an hour or so of adrenaline and sounds pumping through you is a great time to have a puff or a drink. Extensive exercise can get you stuck in a mode and a ...


1

I'm a kale-smoothie drinkin' musician. Now that we have set the tone: When practicing at home (notice: NOT driving-yourself-home), when practicing at home I find that my self-listening is less stressed when taking some of those melty melatonin vitamins, 9mg to be exact, and it helps to practice before bedtime. Naturemade has 'em and calls them vitamelts ...


1

I recently got this advice that has been very useful to other bands with this same issue: include in your regular rehearsal schedule the practice of all songs without the vocals. Seems that one of the most common and important issues is a little too much dependence in the vocalist(s). Instead of counting, some people build a dependence on the vocals as the ...


1

Hey I'm also pretty new to singing and have aspirations of excellence. I've learned a few things and they have helped a lot. I would say number one before technique is to do it everyday. Your vocal chords are muscles and probably have not been properly exercised if you didn't sing when you were young like me. To deal with keeping your chords from ...


1

Tim's answer coveres the vocal straining / hearinign yourself issue, but other factors I have noticed myself : Are the band in tune? The vocalist doen'st stand a chnace if someone is out of tune with the rest. Which note should he/she settle on ? Which instruments are too loud ? My band has been using a new bassist for the last year as our usual guy got ...


1

You have got a lot of advice above already, so I will add just a few more points. You are obviously rehearsing in very small space. Getting a bigger rehearsal space would help. If that is not an option, you could try to use an slanted Marshall cab (two top speakers are at an angle). You could also cover up two bottom speakers with the peace of cardboard, so ...



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