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15

The admonition I run into again and again, attributed to such lights as Thelonius Monk and Louis Armstrong is "play the melody." Of course you will syncopate it, put a little ornamentation here and there, but simple is fine That covers soloing pretty well, but what about comping? Guitarists with jazz chops rarely hang on the same voicing for more than a ...


8

One golden rule. Play less. Lay out. Leave space. If there's someone in the group who CAN play jazz, allow him room to do it. And have fun! Let the music go where it will. Don't rehearse it to death. If it's your turn to play a solo, the melody will be just fine.


3

The answer is simple: Everybody does this his own way. David Gilmour is known to rehearse a lot with his bands. He's someone who values the chemistry between band members very highly, and he also gets a lot of important input from the people around him. Jon Carin, Guy Pratt and Dick Parry are a few people who are known to have contributed very much to the ...


3

As the only chordal instrument, you and you alone can play chords under the soloist. However, full-blooded chords may work well in blues/rock and roll, but only sometimes in jazz. The occasional number will benefit from nice 5 or 6 string chords - maybe arpeggiated, but since the bassist will be rooting and fifthing to a degree, you can find the other notes ...


3

I joined a band, as a bass player, where we DID have a drummer but I was the only member with any sort of "formal" music training (rhythm exercises, reading music, etc.) and we had similar problems. Our timing was off, and we'd drag sometimes. We'd all stay together, but we couldn't play anything tight. What worked for me, to get the issue of rhythm into ...


2

This question is probably more about etiquette than music. They way to avoid giving offence is to frame it as your problem, not theirs - "I'm having some trouble with the rhythm here, I wonder if you can help me..." What you need to work out is whether the complex time signature changes are deliberate or accidental. Perhaps they're prog-heads who enjoy ...


1

I don't think this has a definite answer. There are music stars that would rehearse with the band at all rehearsals and there are others that would join them in the last 2-3 rehearsals. This would depend on a few reasons; If the band doesn't know the songs, the 'music star' might be bored to be there when they learn them, so he/she might wait for them to ...


1

At the end of the day, there is nothing wrong with frequent time signature changes, as long as it's groovy, nor with tempo changes, as long as everyone does them together. If you're going to have that kind of weird stuff, though, it will probably be as off-putting to a listener as it was to you. Whether or not the way they currently have arranged it is ...


1

I guess they've not recorded and listened to their renditions. If they did that, and tapped along or tried to dance to the tunes, it may bring some home truths. They have probably played together for so long and rehearsed so much that anomalies in timing have crept in. 'Practice makes perfect' - it also makes unknown mistakes indelible. On the other hand, ...


1

In addition to the good technical advice you're getting, I'd also suggest getting an idea of what your audience expects (e.g. my listening to past years' acts etc). "Jazz" covers a wide field, from wildly experimental collective improvisation to playing pop standards from 80 years ago, with some pretty solos added. "Downtown Jazz Festival" typically suggests ...


1

I was guitarist in a 3-person jazz combo, with bass and drums. I played a lot of melody and two-part harmony, with chords very occasionally thrown in. A good bass player will keep it interesting. To the extent that worked, a sax/bass/drums combo would also work. So in that light, consider yourself icing on the cake and...add flavor.


1

Tim's answer coveres the vocal straining / hearinign yourself issue, but other factors I have noticed myself : Are the band in tune? The vocalist doen'st stand a chnace if someone is out of tune with the rest. Which note should he/she settle on ? Which instruments are too loud ? My band has been using a new bassist for the last year as our usual guy got ...


1

You have got a lot of advice above already, so I will add just a few more points. You are obviously rehearsing in very small space. Getting a bigger rehearsal space would help. If that is not an option, you could try to use an slanted Marshall cab (two top speakers are at an angle). You could also cover up two bottom speakers with the peace of cardboard, so ...



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