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4

This is not a question of whether the band is rehearsing the right way or the wrong way. Since the band has existed longer than you've been a member, and the other members are content with the situation, the band's current rehearsal seems to fit the goals of the other members. They might be more interested in playing comfortable material than pushing ...


7

As I see it, only you and your bandmates can answer this, because it depends on what you want to do. First off, if you're not gigging... what exactly are you rehearsing for? Someone needs to step up and book gigs, or else I don't see why there's a band in the first place. Assuming you have gigs at some schedule, then I see rehearsal potentially doing three ...


4

One question that this spawns is Has the band played many gigs - in the 6 mths you've been with them? I suspect the answer is no. Too much time spent (wasted) in rehearsals to have a playlist of enough numbers. Sounds harsh. But I've been (for short times, I hasten to add!) in bands like this. I call them 'rehearsal bands' as this is all they do! Some do it ...


1

To add to the other answers let me share some practical ideas I have learned over the years from the days when I used to build homes and build out office space. These ideas will help you reduce considerably reduce the volume of any sound transmitted outside of your practice space, regardless of where you set it up. Sound travels through the air. It ...


-1

This is going to be EXPENSIVE! And, even in a detached house, several hundred feet away from the nearest neighbour, "loud volumes at any time day or night" are going to be classed as a nuisance. Stay where you are, play more quietly and use headphones. You need to practice your music, not continually test your PA system.


2

It really depends on what you mean by "loud volumes", what would be acceptable to your neighbors, and what the pre-existing situation of the dwelling you intend to inhabit is. Your question isn't really answerable with specifics. In my experience as a musician in apartments, townhomes, and single family homes, you can either buy the right dwelling and play ...


7

If you are serious about this, you need to spend a LOT of money. You really need to build a "room within a room", with the floor mounted on a very soft foundation such as flexible airbags, so there is no vibration transmitted through the structure of the house. Then you can think about soundproofing the walls, floor, and ceiling of the inner room to stop ...


5

Let's just say you want to play as loud as you would in a concert. A little googling turns up 110 to 120db being a pretty standard range for concert volumes. The city of Binghamton, NY, USA conveniently posts their noise ordinance as a helpful chart. I'm not sure how representative these are, but they limit levels of sound in multi-unit buildings to 45db at ...


11

While sound proofing can be very effective, sound can be very easily transmitted through air and solid like walls or floors. So in a condo you may be able to sound proof your walls to limit the sound to neighbours, but as anyone who has ever lived above a neighbour knows, your floor will transmit a lot of sound. A detached house will be much better, as ...


0

Probably a little late since the post was created in 2011, but guitartonemaster.com is definitely worth a visit! A website packed with jam and backing tracks.


0

To echo what Faza wrote, it depends on the conductor, as I saw a lecture of Benjamin Zander "it is the conductor which brings out the best of the players".



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