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9

Tim is correct that it's about the 3rd, 5th, and 7th, but I don't agree that in the blues they are flattened by exactly one semi-tone. That is an approximation when writing down the notes or when playing them on a piano, but on any instrument on which in-between notes can be played, these notes will be intonated differently. Especially the 3rd and the 7th ...


9

There is a large difference between tone deafness and an undeveloped voice. Unless your parents are musicians, comments like that can be hurtful and can stifle musical exploration and creativity. Tone deafness is actually quite serious and is as it suggests - an inability to distinguish between certain sounds. This is akin to color-blindness, where a ...


9

In western staff notation every clef represent fixed set of notes so the what is written can easily be conveyed to any musician without much knowledge of the theory behind the notes just the knowledge of this is X note. Also note the key signatures themselves are set in a fixed pattern to simplify the reading for musicians. Even in the more loosely defined ...


5

I can tell you right now you're not tone deaf. Tone deafness is a myth and I'll tell you why. From an Anatomical Point of View If you were tone deaf, you wouldn't be able to understand voice phrasing. You wouldn't be able to Even recognise between playing 2 notes on the piano. you wouldn't even be able to understand speech. ...


4

Typical musicianship includes ear training with the goal of relative pitch vs. absolute pitch in mind. There are tons of tutorials and books to get you started on training your ear to perceive differences of melodic steps as well as harmonic content but the most important part is to have a teacher. If you were to enroll in a college level music theory course ...


4

Ear training is an unfortunate problem here in America. For children during their earliest formative years, precedence is given to visual and tactile learning. While this learning is undoubtedly important, too often are ears left under-developed. If hearing were trained the same way as sight, everyone would have perfect pitch. If I were teaching this ...


4

Yes, you can develop relative pitch through rote practice. But there are plenty of good courses out there that would likely save you a lot of time. Ultimately what you are learning is how to label what you are hearing and as such each person starts with their own strengths and weaknesses. As always combining multiple approaches tends to give the best ...


3

I thought that the flattened notes in Blues were the 3rd, 5th and 7th. However, they're traditionally taken to the next semitone down, as in C, E to Eb, G to Gb and B to Bb. That puts them squarely on the notes mentioned, rather than 'just a bit flat', which may be what's mentioned here. The same three notes are sometimes hinted at, particularly on ...


2

You could try severals things: Intervals training (you can check my answer to this question) Then have her sing the root of each chords of different chords changes. Then the third, and the five. Eventually, have her sing intervals that are not in the chords (play root and fifth and let her sing the thirds) Plus the regular singing exercices: five notes ...


2

Your method is very common and appears to work well for most people. However, I believe that it is much better to actually sing all the intervals regularly because in this way you will internalize the sound much better. The difference between the two approaches is that your approach is passive, whereas singing is active in the sense that you need to be able ...


2

I encountered the same question when I started playing the jammer (in the form of the Hexiano Android app). Due to its isomorphic keyboard layout (and thus ease of transposition), this instrument lends itself very well to a relative-pitch notation. Eventually, I developed my own system of jammer tablature. Of course, it suffers from a lack of musical ...


1

There are essentially two types of perfect pitch. The strict definition would be a person that without hesitation, can name any given note or notes. They are not transposing from a reference point, they just simply know. They can hear someone smash their whole forearm and fist on a keyboard and tell you all of the notes that were played. This is ...


1

I fully believe that there is no such thing as "perfect pitch", at least as it's typically described. It's just memory, plus a lifetime of hearing music. Pretty much every orchestra musician has heard tuning A so many times that they can just sing it back to you with no reference pitch. I'm a brass player, so the Bb arpeggio is seared into my brain in the ...


1

To me this sounds like untrained 'perfect pitch'. I have a pretty solid sense of relative pitch - i.e., give me a note and tell me what it is, and then as long as you don't go through any convoluted chord changes I can still tell you the names of notes. Unfortunately that method only gets you so far (try following some John Coltrane solos). Thus 'perfect ...


1

I am a voice teacher and I would add that many pitch issues are actually registration issues, i.e. coordinating the different registers of the voice, or other issues of vocal production. The singing technique of the student is almost certainly an issue. It is a mistake to think that all or even most pitch issues related to hearing. If I were you I would ...


1

As a piano teacher, you'll be aware of the aural part of ABRSM,et al exams.These could be a basis for starting her pitching.When she practises at home, does she sing along to tracks, backing tracks or what. She needs to bring along whatever , to give you a better idea of how she performs with them.If she's singing acapella, it won't help pitching at all. ...



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