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10

I have had to do this with 3 of my guitars, and by far my best results have been from filling the hole with wood glue and then pushing 3 matchsticks in. Once the glue dries, I use a new screw - same width as the old one, but longer. Super glue really doesn't work on wood - you need wood glue, or wood filler.


9

Hum is produced in a couple of ways, and can indeed be related to a cold solder joint. If the hum goes away when you touch the grounding jacket of your guitar cable or a pickup case, then a cold solder joint or incomplete grounding is likely the problem. To fix this, you are going to need to localize the issue by identifying the cold joint. One way you can ...


9

Will approach this from the standpoint of drums, but the same advice applies to amps and other backline equipment. Communication The best way to handle this would be for the stage manager to get in touch with the owner of the drum kit and clear adjustments ahead of time. If you know who these people are ahead of time, some emails and phone calls can go a ...


8

Your guitar looks pristine for being 20 years old compared to my dinged up 1970 Gibson J45. Personally all the dings in the picture seem somewhat less likely to be a problem than ding #1 which makes me wonder how far that crack goes and if it extends unseen to under the bridge. The first question I think that you should ask is, "does this instrument have ...


8

This is kind of a hack, but I have a Strat that was fixed this way more than 30 years ago... Break a wooden toothpick off in the screw hole and reinsert the screw. Do not over-tighten the screw or you'll end up back where you were.


7

My experience in the UK and europe is that it is fairly standard for bands to share a backline, in terms of a drum kit the term "breakables" gets used quite frequently, this refers to snare bass pedal cymbals As in each band brings their own breakables and there will be a basic drum kit (bass drum, at least one rack tom, one floor tom, hi hat and 2-3 ...


7

As Mark says, there are various products you can coat your pegs with to increase friction. Your local music shop will probably have something. In the past I have even used rosin in an emergency but it will leave dust and mess over time.


6

A number of standard woodworking fixes... 1. Go to Sears and buy a set of "back-out" screw removers. These require drilling a small hole in the offending screw and inserting the device which grips the remains of the screw. With a Dremel or similar tool use a cutting wheel to cut a straight slot in the remains of the screw head and then use a ...


6

Pulling out the pickups, and using plastic tubing to hold onto the volume/tone pots as they slide in to the guitar. For one example, see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p29QN4ycHMU (Putting new pickups in a Gretsch Electromatic)


6

Yes, drilling the end of each crack will stop it from spreading. As far as bent cymbals go, simply hammering it back will cause additional tonal change (an possibly cause a crack, or section to chip off). It is possible to repair the shape, but the sound will never be the same. If you have access to vice-grip or a table vice, I would recommend the ...


6

It really depends on where it was taken, who it was taken to, and how much needed to be done to it. If it was taken to a small, local person with little demand and all it needed was new corks / pads, it wouldn't be too much. If it was local or taken out of state to someone in high-demand / highly regarded and needed a lot of work, it could also have cost a ...


5

I've done this repair several times to the pieces in my maraca collection. I collect the gourd maracas, but gig with synthetic or rawhide. You have two dissimilar surfaces. Close, but not the same. Regular white glue has a lot of water, and the gourd surface of the maraca will want to soak up the water in the glue. I like the yellow carpenters glue. Here ...


5

I would suggest music.stackexchange.com Fitting machine heads is actually incredibly easy - if you buy ones of the same type as those you already have, you will only need a screwdriver and a pair of pliers. Before going down the route of fitting new machine heads, there are two things you can look at though: Pre-stretch your strings Check your nut is ...


5

This is a really subjective question, so you aren't going to get any straight answers--it will all be opinion. What you should do is Google "Telecaster Pickups" and find some sound clips to listen to. It's what I did when I needed some new pickups for my Telecaster. Some decent companies to consider: Loller Guitars: My favorite--I have two sets of ...


5

Is this a school band? As a band director, you should feel comfortable triaging each instrument yourself. Were I in this situation, I would go fetch my own soprano sax mouthpiece, take the instrument, and either verify it is working correctly or demonstrate the correct embouchure. Those are really the only two possibilities: either there's a major ...


5

Soprano and Alto recorders are pretty cheap, relatively speaking. Honestly, it may be worthwhile to explore the possibility of purchasing new instruments. Unlike wood recorders, a plastic recorder's sound will not improve / mature over time, so if the cost of fixing them is comparable to purchasing new ones, it may be a viable alternative. Personally, if ...


5

After 8 years you will not find any manufacturer guarantee, so getting a free repair for inlay damage is not going to happen. If you are not 100% confident, take it to a luthier, but this is actually a straightforward repair. Take off the strings. Carefully remove the inlay Remove the glue from underneath the inlay and from the slot it was in. You can ...


5

Often when a jack socket comes loose, the owner keeps tightening it from outside. This makes the wire attached to the part of the socket which is either inside the guitar body, or under the scratchplate, to turn round. It will only go so far before it either breaks or shorts or touches another component. Sounds like you need to get at the inside part of that ...


4

An alternative to @MWerner's option is if you can't get a screw remover to work, all you need to do is take off enough of the screw head that the strap pin can be pulled off over it. A drill or router type bit will do it. Then you just need a good pair of pliers and some brute force to unscrew the remains of the screw.


4

Through the pickup cavities and the f-hole. I've used a mirror probe and long, skinny tools to install a pickup inside of a parlor guitar; it must be hard as hell to do this work without a full-sized soundhole. You'd need tools like an inspection mirror, tweezers or skinny pliers, long screwdrivers, and skinny flashlights.


4

This should be repairable. Luckily the tension from ukulele strings is not that high, otherwise it would probably have snapped off altogether by now. You'll need a strong glue. I can't tell from your pictures whether it is the wood that has snapped, or the join between two pieces. If both halves are wood, a wood floor should be used, otherwise an epoxy, ...


4

Cut a piece of paper to fit and scotch tape it to the joint. If still loose fold the paper over. The length of the paper should be a little less than the circumference of the joint so it will stay there because the tape will be on the paper and the joint. I use this technique for all my recorders and all joints. It's completely reversable and cheap.


3

The sound will absolutely be affected; how much is hard to say. You should definitely play it and see how it sounds. The soundboard of an acoustic guitar is designed to amplify the vibration of the strings, and if it's not one piece the pieces are laid together carefully to help prevent dampening of the vibration. It's generally best if the grain of the ...


3

You can normally use silver solder on brass instruments. It may take a propane torch instead of a soldering iron. A lot of instruments are silver-plated brass. Check for and seal leaks in the joints and around the valves and spit valves. They can cause resonance problems that make it hard to hit certain notes.


3

Great answers so far! I want to add something in regards to bigger cymbal set-up: bring your own stands. It is a great deal faster to swap the stands with cymbals on them, than to swap cymbals and carefully readjusting, possibly every repositioning, everything. With 3-5 cymbals it's still doable, but not with 10+ cymbals. There might not even be enough ...


3

Here's the trick I learned from an excellent violin maker many years ago. If you are not comfortable changing strings, take your instrument to a violin shop and ask them to show you. They won't charge you and you'll save yourself the trouble of breaking stuff. If the pegs are too small for the holes, take it to the shop and get new pegs. There's an art ...


3

There are generally a few levels of "reconditioning" that could have been done, depending on the quality of the clarinet and how badly it had been neglected. Re-Pad - All padded keys have their pads replaced. Typically also includes cleaning and lubrication of key hinges. Some shops will also replace felt and cork key silencers and any corked key pads at ...


3

The replacements would appear to be black widows, 15", 8 ohms, with more power capacity than the originals, which should also be black widows. Good speakers ! First check the drivers out of circuit, using a small battery. 9v will do. When it's connected to the speaker, the cone should move out or in. If not, it needs changing. If it moves, it should either ...


3

There is zero chance your lighter will damage the wood, unless you've got a clarinet made of bamboo :-) . Grenadilla wood is next to impossible to ignite. As practical matter, matches or lighters are often used to soften pad-glue and reseat pads in situ. I would stay far away from hammers, as you're far more likely to bend things and make it all worse. ...



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