Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

An answer to "How to widen the groove on the nut" : 1) Read the other answers here warning you about what happens if you get it wrong (Tim & Dr Mayhem). If you still want to proceed .. 2) Remove strings - maybe you can just remove the relevant one but it's probably best to give yourself a bit of room so better to remove them all. 3) put a bit of ...


3

I'm guessing with all the bending you appear to do on that low B, that it's already quite a thin gauge string. The nut slot will have been produced for a 'standard' B string, about .054 .058 ish. Have you tried a slightly thinner B string? It might solve the problem of binding in the nut. I'm not sure what the gauge is that Paul would put as standard, but as ...


4

Based on what you have written in your question I would suggest you just take it to a luthier. There are so many things you can get wrong here that it probably is not worth it. Widening the groove too far will lead to buzzing and tone problems and is not reversible - messing this up requires replacing the nut. There are good examples of videos on YouTube ...


0

I have a Yamaha FG 110 and the neck warped beyond what the truss rod is capable of correcting. This might have happened because it was stored for many years under full string tension (not a good idea). If the truss rod was broken or stripped it would likely turn too easily. If you can loosen the truss rod but only tighten it so far before it won't turn ...


2

Measure how deeply the original goes into the wood, then use a screw which is the same or slightly longer so it goes in approximately the same depth.


8

Strap locks are generally designed for electric guitars, because electrics are more often heavy, and it's heavy instruments that tend to shake their straps loose. Hence, locking buttons are usually attached with a long wood screw, buried into the solid wood. Acoustics tend not to have those deep solid wooden areas. If you like to have your strap attached ...


2

As long as you use locks designed for your instrument body type, the stock screws don’t matter much, as strap locks typically have you replace them with a screw designed to secure the new hardware. Just use the provided equipment and follow the directions. While it is certainly possible to strip the screw holes while installing strap locks, that is a very ...


1

First port of call - Paul Reed Smith. He may well have seen the problem before. It makes life easier to slacken the strings before tightening the truss rod.While they're loose, try to turn another turn, you'll feel if it's binding or the thread has gone, more easily.


2

Truss rod adjustments do not usually affect the neck with an immediate change. Depending on the base wood, it could take 30 minutes to an hour before the truss rod has had it's full effect on the neck. My recommendation would be to wait 30 minutes to an hour and check again. If you feel you have made the proper adjustments, but your guitar neck is skill ...


2

Since you stretch your strings and would prefer not to have your guitar worked on at a shop, a quick fix would be a lubricant. Before the Floyd Rose tremolo system existed, lots of players would apply lubricants to the nuts of their guitars as needed. This allows the strings to slide through the nut when bent or when used heavily by a whammy bar. Van Halen ...


0

Your best option is to find a local luthier/guitar tech that is respected and ask to apprentice with him and learn everything you can. Other than that, there are some schools that teach guitar tech. One I know of is the Musicians Institute: http://mi.edu/degrees-programs/industry-programs/guitar-craft/ That being said, you can also do what others are ...


1

Get yourself a second hand guitar, broken or not. Cheap is good. Then use it as your guinea pig. Chances are you won't break it, but when it ends up as a real playable instrument because you've fettled it by yourself, it'll be a great feeling. If the worst comes to the worst, it's cost you very little, but given you great experience!


1

I found this author extremely helpful. His basic guitar setup is one of the indispensable books i used to learn. http://www.amazon.com/Hideo-Kamimoto/e/B001KHY1WA If you have a cheap beginners guitar to practice on you'll sleep better at night, but keep in mind the cheaper they are, the harder to get to play right and you'll be working for nothing. But ...


2

If you are willing to buy a book, this is the indispensable reference: http://www.danerlewine.com/guitar_repair_books.html The guy's a god, and it covers everything from how to string the instrument to insanely complex repairs like neck resets and fixing holes in the side...


1

If you can find a luthier locally, you might be able to convince them to let you observe them working, especially on your own guitar - maybe even guide you to do the fixes yourself. You could certainly ask your friendly luthier for advice how to learn, or at the very least how they learned.


3

This might help : Haynes Guitar Books I have the Stratocaster one and found it full of great info. The guitar books are intended as a bit of 'uselful humour', I guess - if you haven't heard of Haynes, they're a part of the home auto mechanic's folklore (in UK at least): Historically, from the 1960's, Haynes manuals have provided great information on how ...


1

There are several instructional DVDs available that go through the entire flow of setting up a guitar. Here's one example after a quick search: http://www.amazon.com/Guitar-Setup-Maintenance-Instructional-Denny/dp/B002I9PSQC



Top 50 recent answers are included