Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

Because of dynamics called room modes. Room modes are the collection of resonances that exist in a room when the room is excited by an acoustic source such as a loudspeaker. (...) each frequency being related to one or more of the room's dimension's or a divisor thereof. To keep things simple, we will assume the room has 6 parallel walls (right prism ...


10

JCPedroza's answer is correct for a square room, but I think it's worth pointing out that the shape of the room is not just it's dimensions. For example, a square room with an open window will act different than if the window is shut. In acoustics, we often model the response of a room as a circuit. If you break up the space into pieces, each piece can be ...


6

I would advise against doing so. I expect that you intend to exchange both heads of your drum, to save some money. I've done that, once or twice, because I had to (very bad dent on the batter head, no spare available, and I had to play). First, it supposes that you use the same model head on both sides of you toms, which is often seen but in no way a ...


5

I would strongly advise against it. The resonant head is supposed to resonate. If you have beaten your batter head to a point where it should be changed as a batter head, it really means it should be changed. It's beyond the point of optimal resonance and thus using it as a resonant head will not produce a good sound. Batter and resonant heads don't ...


5

Based on what you've given us to go on, the instrument with the resonant frequency of this cave you visit would be an identical cave. :-) Before you start thinking about instruments, materials, or tuning, you need some ballpark as to what this resonant frequency actually is. The most reliable way to determine this would be to bring a tone generator (like a ...


4

The answers to both of these questions depends strongly on context. Obviously, any single note played in isolation won't sound functionally different from any other note played in isolation, so in order to give it functional meaning (as a 2nd or 5th or what have you) you need to play it in the context of a key. Consider that we're in the key of C major. The ...


3

One form of the phenomenon is called the "standing wave". As it applies to rooms or acoustic spaces, it is sometimes refered to as "resonant room mode". Here is a link to an article in Audioholics Magazine that discusses how these phenomena affect room acoustics.


3

The thing you haven't really taken into account is that all instruments (including metal bars) have a range of frequencies, not just one, and you may have a range of resonant frequencies in the cave itself, so you will need to think about what tone you are intending to get. For example you may use an instrument that happens to have a harmonic at a resonant ...


3

Open strings always sound different to fretted notes - more resonant and with more sustain. Players of string instruments learn to avoid open strings for that reason, and sometimes to take advantage of the different tone of an open string. Other than that, it does seem that you've identified a resonant frequency in the body of your guitar. That is probably ...


1

I'm guessing it's an acoustic with a round hole. A small piece of pipe lagging (sponge) stuck inside the guitar, under the bridge or surrounding area - you may have to experiment - with gaffer or duct tape, could solve this annoying problem, which may also show itself on the E string, as that is a harmonic of A, or the D string, which has A as its ...


1

It depends on the style of music. In modern jazz and blues, a dominant 7th chord can be an ending chord. So can a major 7th chord like C - E - G - B. Listen to the ending of "Le Boeuf sur le Toit" by Darius Milhaud.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible