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25

There was a trick for these that I used all the time based on what the rests look like. The whole rest looks like a hole. The words sound the same so it's a good way to equate them. The half rest looks like a hat and since hat and half both start with the letter 'h' they go together. I like this trick a lot because it associates the rests more with ...


17

In elementary school, I was taught to think of the rest like a raft in water. Since a half rest gets two beats, it's like a raft carrying two people - light enough to float on top of the water: The whole rest, on the other hand, gets four beats (in common time, anyway) and so it's like a raft carrying four people - enough weight such that it sinks down ...


12

A whole-note (semibreve) rest hangs D-O-W-N from the line (four letters, so four beats). A half-note rest points U-P from the line (two letters, so two beats).


9

It's easier to read when you show the beat structure by using ties: Dotted-eighth_then_sixteenth | tied to an eighth_then_eighth | tied to a sixteenth_then_dotted-eighth | eighth_eighth. I'm showing beaming with the _ and new beats (not beamed together) with |. This way, the underlying beat is always immediately clear, and it's much easier to see how the ...


8

You can say the whole rest hangs below the bar because it's "heavier", so it's value is bigger than the half rest, which sits above the bar, indicating it weighs less, and therefore has half the resting time.


6

Be explicit about it. Time signatures can change rapidly in modern music, so we need to see all beats accounted for. If I'm reading a piece by Mozart and the end of the bar is empty, I'd feel okay about just assuming the rests, but if I'm playing Stravinsky and I see a measure with the wrong number of beats, I don't know what the hell is going on. There ...


6

In your score, if you count the tied notes as a unit (which you should) adds up to 9 notes and there are 9 notes in the original part. Count the notes between the circles as one. The original score is trying to collect all these values into one. The way your score turned out is correct and much more simplified. I doubt you'll come across the first one ...


4

Here are 4 versions from the following LilyPond input: \version "2.19.2" << \new RhythmicStaff { 8. 16~8 8~16 8. 8 8 } \new RhythmicStaff { 8. 8. 8. 8. 8 8 } \new RhythmicStaff { \tweak text #tuplet-number::calc-fraction-text \tuplet 2/3 4. { 8 8 8 8 } 8 8 } \new RhythmicStaff { \tweak text #tuplet-number::calc-fraction-text ...


4

My music teacher told me, a 100% criminal hangs, a 50% criminal sits. I have never been able to forget it. (It's snappier in German; ein ganzer Verbrecher hängt, ein halber Verbrecher sitzt.)


3

No, there's not a conventional rest you can use for that. But you have a couple of options here, depending on what effect is intended. Remember to always go with the simplest solution that accurately represents your intention. Staccato: In this case (and many others), a simple staccato over an eighth note will make this far more legible, especially for ...


3

This track seems to me to be right on the beat. Keys dictate the tempo, but drums and bass lock in with them. Nothing is pushed or pulled. The tempo on the track I listened to started at 98bpm went to 104 towards the middle, but no one instrument seemed to make this happen. If you're having problems with the rhythm section keeping together, try facing each ...


3

In the case of the example, the readability might be improved by using a doubly-dotted quarter rest instead of the sixteenth, eighth and quarter rests. Technically, all the rests in the measure could be replaced by a triply-dotted half rest, but I can't recall ever seeing that in print.


3

No, but informally you can just leave blank space. As long as there are no other notes on that stave, it will be perfectly clear what you want. Please note, though, this is informal, and not theoretically correct. It would be fine if you were quickly writing down a score or part for somebody; best not to do it in a music theory exam! If you use a music ...


3

Similar to t_eld's but a bit less convoluted I think Imagine you just walked into a room, wearing a brimmed "rest hat". If you're only there for a shorter amount of time, you might leave it on (half rest). If you're there for a longer amount of time, you might take it off (whole rest).


3

The mnemonic device I remember seeing in elementary school music class was that the half rest is "weaker" so it has to lay on the ground (the staff line), while the whole rest is "stronger" so it can cling to the ceiling. This was illustrated with some cartoon block dudes sleeping, though I can't remember what mechanism was holding Mr. Whole Rest to the ...


3

That's an old style crotchet (quarter note) rest before the minim (half note) chord. It's in the alto voice (as is the chord), which is why it's lower than the centre of the stave - you'll note the measure rest for the descant on the top line.


2

I remember hearing "A Whole rest hangs and a half rest rests." from someone somewhere, but I like the answer from @Dom.


2

I heard from a music teacher that he tells his students that the whole rest is somehow "bigger" than half rest, so it is "heavier"(!) and can not stay above the line (4th line of stave) and it has dropped down, while half rest is not that heavy and can stay above the line! I'm not sure if it would be a good way for you too, since his students were all ...


2

My music teacher had a good way to remember them based on the fact it looks like a hat. A man came over to visit. He was only planning on visiting for a short time, so he put his hat on top of the chair (half rest). After a while, he realized he wanted to stay later and needed a place to sit, so he had to move his hat under the chair (whole rest) so he ...


2

Before I continue, I would like to clarify that Greek Tragedies (the music) by and large weren't actually written in Greek, but rather, used Greek stories and legends as plot devices. The revitalization of Greek philosophers and artists in the early Renaissance spurred the creation of madrigal comedies and madrigal cycles in which several madrigals would be ...


2

A quarter note is called that because it is always a quarter the duration of a whole note. This true regardless of the time signature, tempo, or number of beats in a bar. You will notice that in 3/4, a whole note does not fit into a measure.


2

Typically the rhythm guitarist, drummer and bass player set the groove. If they're not locking, then the drummer and bass player should set the groove, especially for R&B. The drummer, bassist and guitarist should all play on the same place within those cute little Gaussian curves that are the beat. What I hear in your question is that the rhythm ...


1

The term you are looking for is anacrusis, also known as a pick-up measure. This is where the piece of music begins on a partial bar and on an off-beat before a full bar of music occurs. Beyond that, off-beat phrases can be introduced later in the piece by changing to a different (often odd-time) time signature for one measure and then going back to the ...


1

It's true that a crotchet is though of as a 1/4 note - taken from a 'whole note' being a semibreve (worth 4 crotchets). However, the word semibreve comes from half a breve, which actually intimates that a whole note SHOULD be worth 8 crotchets - or - a crotchet OUGHT to be a 1/8 note...


1

A full gentleman takes his hat off to greet a lady (full rest looks like an upside down hat), but a half gentleman leaves his hat on his head (half rest looks like a riteside up hat). Credit for this goes to my second grade music teacher who I can remember only as Large, with a blond ponytail to her waist and drawing music notation on the chalkboard.


1

Swing really doesn't consist of triplets at all. When you play a lot of triplets you actually destroy the swing. It seems to me there are several elements: 2-bar or 4-bar phrasing. This is very important. The moment you go into thinking 1-bar phrases the swing stops. long bass notes. Classically trained players will typically play quavers followed by ...


1

I was taught: Semibreve = Spider. Hangs from a line. Minim = Mouse. Runs along a line.


1

This is fun! Here's the goofy mnemonic device I was taught in elementary school: Imagine the rest as a ham. Yes, a ham. As long as it's whole and uncut, it hangs (on a hook under the ceiling of the larder). When you take it down and cut it in half, it rests on top (of the kitchen table) - just like the whole rest hangs below its line and the half sits on ...


1

If all you want is a quick way to tell which is which while sight reading, then if there's any notes in the measure along with the rest, it's a half rest. Reason being, a whole rest signifies that you rest for the whole measure and therefore by definition it will be by itself. Non-4/4 time signatures are a grey area, but this link seems to indicate that ...


1

At the end of the day, there is nothing wrong with frequent time signature changes, as long as it's groovy, nor with tempo changes, as long as everyone does them together. If you're going to have that kind of weird stuff, though, it will probably be as off-putting to a listener as it was to you. Whether or not the way they currently have arranged it is ...



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