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8

It's kind of a strange story. In an early form of notation there were two kinds of notes, long and short. "Longa" means "long" and "breve" means short. So the longest note you are ever likely to see in modern music (twice as long as the longest note you usually see) is a "short". At some point someone needed a shorter note than the short, thus the "half ...


4

A time signature does not affect the duration of any tuple. For example: An 8th note triplet will always take up 1/3 of a quarter note A 16th note triplet will always take up 1/3 of an 8th note A 32nd note triplet will always take up 1/3 of a 16th note An 8th note duplet will always take up 1/2 of a dotted quarter note A 16th note duplet will always take ...


4

Wikipedia has a very good breakdown of how notes are named. Here's a snippet of just the names of the ones that are different: American Name British Name double note | breve whole note | semibreve half note | minim quarter note | crotchet eighth note ...


3

While the typical notes are based on divisions of 2 (i.e. whole, half, quarter, 8th, 16th, ect) using tuples you can have any almost any ratio of notes you can utilize to split up a measure. Here is a layout of notes from whole notes to what you could call 9ths: As you can see all take up a whole measure of 4/4 and dived them equally and you could ...


3

Take a simpler example: what would a time signature of 2/3 mean? If you divide a whole note into three equal parts, in conventional notation you would write that as a triplet of half-notes (= UK minims). But suppose you want the music contain some normal-length half-notes followed by just two notes at the speed of a triplet, and them continue normal-length ...


1

The denominator doesn't have to be a power of 2. From Wikipedia: The lower numeral indicates the note value that represents one beat (the beat unit). The upper numeral indicates how many such beats there are grouped together in a bar. For instance, 2/4 means two quarter-note (crotchet) beats per bar and 3/8 means three eighth-note (quaver) ...


1

For your two examples in particular we have a very precise naming convention in german. Let's see if this works in english, too. 'Achtel-Feeling' vs. 'Triolet-Feeling' As you can see the word 'Feeling' is very german ;-))) In english this would be STRAIGHT- FEEL vs. SWING-FEEL... Groove is the groove of a LP(LongPlay, Schelack, Record) and just means ...



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