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9

You're right it's just a dotted eighth note and a sixteenth note. The bar across the top is called a beam and it is typically used to group smaller notes by beats. For example that pattern in 4/4 would take up one of the four quarters note beats. Grouping them together clearly shows they make one beat in 4/4.


8

This sounds similar-to (but more general than) the so-called Speech-to-Song effect, a musical illusion discovered and described by musical psychologist Dr. Diana Deutsch, whereby a repeated phrase of speech comes to sound like music. I think the effect you're discussing is a more general effect, since it involves any repeated sound, and does not necessarily ...


5

I am looking for adding a comment in Italian to the notes so that I don't have to write the legatos and staccatos explicitly all over the place (as this part of the piece is quite long). Although I know generally what a minuet is musically, I don't know what "minuet steps" means. I wouldn't associate the phrase with any particular articulation ...


4

Yes, you absolutely can. As with so many things, this is not a black-or-white thing. There's not some kind of gene that says you'll either be a master at playing the drums, or totally suck at it. Many things come into play here: The ability to concentrate. The ability to control your motions accurately. Eye-hand coordination. Stamina. Willpower. These ...


3

What is happening is that they change the interpretation of the rhythm of the repeating melodic figure. First you have a triplet or 12/8 feel, where each note of the melodic figure is interpreted as an eighth note (or eighth triplet, if you think in triplets). Here you have four beats before the pattern repeats. Then the same melodic figure (continuing at ...


3

The metronome is always a great place to start. But to improve your non-metronomic time keeping, here's a neat little exercise. Find a metronome where you can silence subdivisions or beats, preferably from a whole phrase. Then set a phrase to play in 4/4 for however many bars you want. I like sixteen. Mute the last bar and see how you come back in on the ...


3

A composer differentiates between 12/8 and 6/8 depending on phrase-lengths / structures. If a structure repeats a certain number of beats less than 12/8, the time signature should be reduced to fit the song appropriately. Yes, you are correct - in 3/4 you would have 3 quarter notes, in 6/8 you would have 2 dotted quarter notes. I actually don't believe ...


2

My professor had me slow practice four-note chords in each hand to fix this. For example: CEGC, EGCE, GCEG, CEGC (an octave higher than the first one), GCEG, EGCE, CEGC. Together with both hands, each hand an octave apart. Make sure that the notes all fall together, do it with all the keys. It's also a great exercise for pedaling; see if you can make the ...


2

I would separate the sense of rhythm from the distinct skill of limb-independence. What you are actually trying to achieve right now isn't timing, or rhythm, it's the separation of one task [hands] from another [feet] With no sense of rhythm whatsoever, you can practise patting your head & rubbing your stomach… then swap hands! Once you can do that ...


2

Can you read music, or, more importantly do you know the rhythm that you are trying to sing and that is tripping you up? that is to say, do you understand what is going on rhythmically? From my experience as a teacher when students struggle with this it is because they do not understand parts of the rhythm that they cannot feel "naturally." So, if you ...


2

+1 to making yourself a metronome slave and self-recording. One exercise I did as a kid was clapping along to metronome beats. If I was successful, I couldn't hear the metronome click, only the clap. Another trick I try to keep myself in the habit of (especially when counting off, but also when playing) is subdividing in my head, or silently with my mouth ...


2

A rhythm is essentially a recurring relationhip between the time intervals at which noticable 'events' in a sound wave are occurring. These 'events' can be of many types, though - could be a drum beat, or the start of a note being played - or it could be a sudden change in timbre of a sound, or even a sound stopping. Think of what happens when a CD player ...


1

We LIKE patterns. Our minds and brains crave for order, for organization. If you write abtruse dodecaphonic music with no tonal basis at all, listeners will strive (often successfully) to find a tonic. Let's not start a fight, but this could help explain why some people are happier with design than with evolution. The answer to this specific question is ...


1

The problem could easily lie with either the way the musicians are playing the music or your inability to hear it and yourself clearly in the monitors. It may have nothing to do with your ability to keep tempo at all. Many very talented and gifted vocalist who can sing karaoke or with a backing track they practice with, do just fine - until they try to ...


1

As Dom says, it's a beam. Beams will join notes (as long as they are smaller than crotchets!)to make patterns of beats. In 4/4 time they should join any appropriate notes to split the bar into 2 equal halves. It's not always written like that these days - but it does make things easier to read. Likewise, in a 2/4 bar, a beam would stretch for the equivalent ...


1

It could be 6/8 or it could be 12/8. It depends on how it's implemented and how you want it to be accented. In 6/8 you are breaking the measure into two dotted eight note beats and in 12/8 you are breaking the measure into four dotted eight note beats. Think of it in terms of syllables from common words*: AP - ple (for duple meter) Hot - po - ta - to (for ...


1

It's really just a matter of practice. Without seeing what's going on I would think that your fingers aren't as strong as they could be and some fingers are stronger then others. In this case just simple exercises like scales and arpeggios should be able to help. If it's just a coordination problem then you can practice that by just practicing putting your ...


1

Have a strong inner metronome-- count in your head the time signature: 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, etc. You will naturally accent the downbeat. After some practice, you will not need to consciously count in your head. Honestly, you shouldn't try to pay a lot of attention to the downbeat and risk overemphasizing it. It could become a nasty habit that makes you sound ...


1

Correct. There is a subjective component to this decision, but you generally want to keep the placement of the beat as clear as possible. The rule of thumb is that when a note doesn't begin on a beat, it should not cross into another beat without a tie, unless the notation is simple enough (e.g. quarter, half, quarter) that there is no ambiguity in how the ...


1

Note, however, that a semibreve rest is placed at the beginning of the bar, where a semibreve note would go. A whole bar rest, which uses the same symbol as the semibreve rest, is centered in the bar.


1

In classic music theory when you have a full bar of rest you use the semi breve rest regardless of what time signature you are in. This is to aid in reading the rest. Unlike notes the grouping of rest always aims to use as few rest as possible in attempt to not make reading the score unnecessarily difficult. If you are playing in a symphony and you have to ...



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