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Is it just a matter of chance that we note music as we do? One of the ideas put forward by A generative theory of tonal music is that "the events of a piece are related to a regular alternation of strong and weak beats at a number of hierarchical levels" - I believe the suggestion is that this is something fundamental to the human experience of music, ...


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The most important when counting is to get the basic beat right. In 4/4 like you havehere, you normally count the quarters: When you have a punctuated quarter, the next beat comes before it is finished. See the first measure here: Note that you have a small eigth note (the first G♯ in the last measure) that is put in between the other notes. It is ...


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The treble clef for the first 2 bars can be counted like 1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a b d f# b a a g# g# 1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a f# d d (hold note) I'll leave the rest ...


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If it helps, keep in mind that in music typography helps a lot with counting too. If the music is reasonably well set, notes in the two clefs that sound together are vertically aligned. For example, in the first bar of the second passage, you can see that the first of the two semiquavers in the treble clef aligns with the fourth quaver in the bass clef so ...


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Slightly different slant on this - why don't you practice with a metronome yourself - and then when you improve and your colleague asks "How on earth do you do that" you reply "Well actually..." I often practice (trumpet) with a metronome ticking but I imagine the ticks are on the 'and' between beats rather than on the beat, so I mentally have to construct ...


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My argument for using a metronome- at least occasionally- is this: if you can't play a straight beat, you have no assurance that your "expressive" playing with the rhythm is not just bad technique. You need to have a basis to start from, or it's all just sloppy. Thus, I would say that it's at least worthwhile to use a metronome to check whether you can do ...


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It's going to depend to a great extent on what type or genre of music is being played. Dance music, of any era, will need to be 'metronomic', as dancers will rely on each beat being in the correct place - otherwise they'll have a tendency to fall over - or stop dancing. It's the same with marching music. However, there is a huge amount of music to be played ...


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I don't remember where I read this, but some scholarly music history article traced the back beat to the early 1920s or so and claimed it originated with the country music (then called "hillbilly" to distinguish it from "race" music) guitar strumming patterns. It does seem to be common in US developed music, jazz, country, rock, etc. Edit: I found a nice ...



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