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26

There was a trick for these that I used all the time based on what the rests look like. The whole rest looks like a hole. The words sound the same so it's a good way to equate them. The half rest looks like a hat and since hat and half both start with the letter 'h' they go together. I like this trick a lot because it associates the rests more with ...


21

A semibreve rest CAN be used in 6/8 time - or ANY time (apart from 4/2 - quite unusual)) to represent one bar's rest. At that point, it isn't actually a 'semibreve', but represents just one bar of that music. It's become a shorthand way of saying "one whole bar rest".


19

In elementary school, I was taught to think of the rest like a raft in water. Since a half rest gets two beats, it's like a raft carrying two people - light enough to float on top of the water: The whole rest, on the other hand, gets four beats (in common time, anyway) and so it's like a raft carrying four people - enough weight such that it sinks down ...


16

A semibreve rest is the symbol to be used for "whole-bar rest", regardless of the meter. A whole-bar rest is also distinguished by being written in the middle of the bar rather than being aligned with beat 1 in other staves or voices. This exalted central bar position is otherwise only used by "bourdon" notes carrying multiple syllables in free meter, like ...


14

There are 3 separate voices. Voice 1 is the high D-F#-A-G, voice 2 is the middle [eighth rest]-D-A-E-A, and voice 3 is the half notes.


12

A whole-note (semibreve) rest hangs D-O-W-N from the line (four letters, so four beats). A half-note rest points U-P from the line (two letters, so two beats).


11

It's a good start that you are aware of the problem because many people never become aware of their timing issues. I suggest you use a simple DAW or a drum computer for producing drum grooves with variable tempo. Choose a comfortable tempo and keep playing a 4-bar vamp which is technically not challenging for you. The latter is important because as long as ...


11

This is a pretty strange measure of music, I will grant you that. I would have notated this differently, but it is playable if you can decipher it. The notes in the middle voice should be written as single eighth notes and tied eighth notes. "Staggering" the three syncopated notes in the middle voice by writing them as quarter notes is against the ...


10

The difference between a sextuplet and two triplets is that the two triplets are clearly substructured into two units. The sextuplet in contrast may either be substructured into three groups of two notes, or it may not be substructured at all. If you have one ascending run (for example) written as sextuplets, chances are that the composer intends you to ...


10

Without a picture, we can just guess, and my guess is that it is referring to a triplet. Something like this for instance: Τhe eighth triplets (second group,second bar) are 3 eighth notes that are being played in one beat; the quarter triplets (first group,second bar) are 3 quarter notes that are being played on two beats etc.


9

A bar's duration can be represented using the whole note No, not always! This is the incorrect assumption you're making. A bar's 'duration' depends on the time signature. So, in a standard 4/4 bar, the bar is 4 quarter notes long. (4 * 1/4...see where this is going?) Alternatively, in a 3/2 bar, the bar is 3 half notes long, or 3 * 1/2! So, whilst a ...


9

I'm sure someone more experienced will come to help, but for now, here are some suggestions: Make use of dissonant chords. In particular, augumented fifths, and diminished major sevenths. In particular I'd just look into the various scale modes (e.g. Lydian) and pick out chords from there. If it's a slow horror song I'd suggest using a Dorian mode for ...


9

You're right it's just a dotted eighth note and a sixteenth note. The bar across the top is called a beam and it is typically used to group smaller notes by beats. For example that pattern in 4/4 would take up one of the four quarters note beats. Grouping them together clearly shows they make one beat in 4/4.


9

This sounds similar-to (but more general than) the so-called Speech-to-Song effect, a musical illusion discovered and described by musical psychologist Dr. Diana Deutsch, whereby a repeated phrase of speech comes to sound like music. I think the effect you're discussing is a more general effect, since it involves any repeated sound, and does not necessarily ...


9

Now I know what values notes can have and what they look like and all that, but what I don't get is how you can place somthing... on them? The author is saying "place a sound every X": as in every quarter, or every eight, or every sixteenth. Here are some examples of one measure in 4/4. The grid is divided in sixteenths. Every quarter: Placed on ...


9

It's easier to read when you show the beat structure by using ties: Dotted-eighth_then_sixteenth | tied to an eighth_then_eighth | tied to a sixteenth_then_dotted-eighth | eighth_eighth. I'm showing beaming with the _ and new beats (not beamed together) with |. This way, the underlying beat is always immediately clear, and it's much easier to see how the ...


9

You can say the whole rest hangs below the bar because it's "heavier", so it's value is bigger than the half rest, which sits above the bar, indicating it weighs less, and therefore has half the resting time.


8

When you first start to record yourself against a strict tempo, that's when you discover the unforgiving world of click tracks.... it's a pain we all have to go through. Things to make life easier... Use some kind of 'drum machine' - anything that can give some 'feel' to the track you are about to lay down, even if it sounds nothing like a drummer, that ...


8

Yes. Now that does not seem like an overly helpful answer. The most important thing is that you feel the importance of the beats and the way they structure the music, and that your feeling is allowed to express yourself in its interpretation. For any instrument, there are a number of ways of putting expressiveness in, and all of those are, of course, ...


8

Dots in general start to get messy after the first one and can lead to confusion to while sight reading if more than one is used. For the sake of sight reading there are even some syncopated lines where a normal duration like a quarter note or eighth note are represented as ties to show the beat better. Using more than one dot is more theoretical in ...


8

It's kind of a strange story. In an early form of notation there were two kinds of notes, long and short. "Longa" means "long" and "breve" means short. So the longest note you are ever likely to see in modern music (twice as long as the longest note you usually see) is a "short". At some point someone needed a shorter note than the short, thus the "half ...


7

Yes, this is a common problem for anyone who's ever trying to do more than one thing at a time (which for musicians, is quite often). You have to be nice to your brain. Take it slow, painfully, agonizingly slow In fact, don't even play in time. I suggest breaking down the physical motions into their most basic components, and explain what needs to happen ...


7

I'm guessing that tied notes have rather taken over. They're easier to read - were there two or three dots?- and the grouping probably is easier to follow. Let's face it, it's simpler to read a crotchet tied to a shorter note than do the sums to work out how long the (double) dotted note needs to be.


6

A whole note takes up a full measure in 16/16, 8/8, 4/4, and 2/2 time only. A whole note has the value of 4 quarter notes or 2 half notes. Since how common 4/4 time is (it is even also referred to as common time) it makes sense that the notes name line up with the use in 4/4. In 3/2 the whole measure is represented by a dotted whole note (i.e. a whole note ...


6

Be explicit about it. Time signatures can change rapidly in modern music, so we need to see all beats accounted for. If I'm reading a piece by Mozart and the end of the bar is empty, I'd feel okay about just assuming the rests, but if I'm playing Stravinsky and I see a measure with the wrong number of beats, I don't know what the hell is going on. There ...


6

In your score, if you count the tied notes as a unit (which you should) adds up to 9 notes and there are 9 notes in the original part. Count the notes between the circles as one. The original score is trying to collect all these values into one. The way your score turned out is correct and much more simplified. I doubt you'll come across the first one ...


6

A very common way to notate lyrics where pitch doesn't matter is to just use a single line staff to note the rhythmic hits. In this system everything is the same except there are not distinct pitches per note. Here's an example of this system used to notate The Aggressive Bee: ]1


5

"Impressionist composers should be banned from using water as inspiration. Just way too many notes." - don't shoot the pianist In these circumstances, the composer's manuscript is always a valuable tool to use to determine why a publisher made the decision to do something the way they did. In this case, the manuscript is fortunately available to us ...


5

This kind of beaming often indicates that that very passage in Violin II has a displaced accent when compared to the other instruments: while they follow the time signature changes, from 2/4 to 3/4 and back to 3/4, the second violin keeps a metric accent likewise to 3/4 throughout all the selected excerpt. The beaming serves to guide the player through the ...


5

You are right. They have exactly the same rhythmic values. It would make more sense to use the sextuplets unless: the music obviously accents two groups of three notes per beat. the music often intersperses quavers (8th) notes with groups of triplet semiquavers (16th). In either case where you use triplet semiquavers, I would group pairs of them with a ...



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