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23

They are actually eighth note triplets instead of eighth notes. The alternative notation to this would be to group the eighth notes and rests in threes and put a 3 over them like a standard triplet, but it's easy enough to see that you are fitting 12 equally spaced notes in a measure which end up being eighth note triplets which would kind of screw up the ...


19

The eighth notes in the left hand are all triplets. The ones in the right hand are normal. Note how the note heads line up vertically in measure 4. On a purely technical level, this is incorrect notation. But it's something that can be figured out pretty easily, so I guess Liszt either didn't care or wrote it like that for artistic reasons.


17

There are note values not notateable without ties. For example: A note the length of a crotchet (quarter note) + a semiquaver (sixteenth note) would need to be written with a tie, as there's no notation which says "add a quarter of the length of the note to its duration". We've got "add half" (dotted notes) and "add three quarters" (double dotted notes), ...


14

Technically speaking, you can't ever say for certain until you see the original score (if there even is one) as determined by the composer; a piece could literally be written in an infinite number of time signatures. As such, we have to make these decisions based on a knowledge of prior practice and on what makes the most practical sense. So, let's look at ...


12

Yes it is possible to have a note that is part of a triplet and dotted for example: In this we're using quarter note triplets. Instead of having them all be 3 even quarter note triplets the first one is dotted and the second one is shortened giving us a triplet consisting of a dotted quarter note followed by an eigth note followed by a quarter note to ...


12

They're a staple of rock, and as bass guitar is often used as a rock instrument, they are seen as one of the basic techniques of bass playing. With many rock rhythms, quarter notes are too slow and make the song feel lethargic, while 16ths are too frantic and hard to play. 8th notes are, for many songs, just the right thing to drive things forward with the ...


11

1 2 3, 1 2 3, 1 2 is Calypso rhythm. Although it appears it often has a 4/4 or 8/8 time signature, I have seen it 3+3+2/8. Even with a more regular time signature, you may find it notated with two dotted-crotchets (which shouldn't cross over the secondary beat on to the third crotchet) and a dotted bar-line before the fourth crotchet.


10

It's kind of a strange story. In an early form of notation there were two kinds of notes, long and short. "Longa" means "long" and "breve" means short. So the longest note you are ever likely to see in modern music (twice as long as the longest note you usually see) is a "short". At some point someone needed a shorter note than the short, thus the "half ...


8

It's not a triplet. The arc is a phrase mark and the 3 is the fingering of the note on the third beat. Together they kind of look like a triplet, but you can tell it is not a triplet because the arc is continued in the next measure confirming it is a phrase mark.


8

I'd put it in 6/8, due to the triplets feel, but the phrasing kind of repeats every two bars, thus two lots of 3/8, making 6/8. Why /8? Well, it's fairly quick, so I'd write it as quavers instead of crotchets. There is a recent question on that subject - quavers to play give the feeling that they are quicker - I know it depends on the tempo mark, but ...


7

If you establish the rhythm as constant and repetitive then the audience can easily grab onto that and when that constant is disrupted it's like yanking the rug out from underneath their feet. However, if you were playing a piece that was free-flowing in tempo so there wasn't a constant pulse to latch onto then the audience would likely be more oblivious and ...


7

You are apparently confusing the notational peculiarity of an anacrusis right at the beginning of a piece (which is notated using a partial bar, usually without a bar number of its own) with the musical function of the anacrusis, a short leading phrase before its principal reference point, usually the beginning of a bar. By far most anacruses don't ...


6

A very common way to notate lyrics where pitch doesn't matter is to just use a single line staff to note the rhythmic hits. In this system everything is the same except there are not distinct pitches per note. Here's an example of this system used to notate The Aggressive Bee: ]1


6

No need to bother too much with notating swing, it makes everything harder to write and to read. Just write once, above of the staff something like: Swing [two quavers] = [a crotchet and quaver triplet] Shuffle [two quavers] = [a dotted quaver and a semiquaver] With nice images instead of the […], obviously.


6

The short answer is yes. Triplet marking is often optional. The composer is basically saying these are triplets, and play all the others the same. The basic rule is if you see three 8th notes that are taking up a single quarter note's place, then you play them as triplets whether they are marked as such or not. Another clue is that 8th notes beamed in ...


6

These are definitely triplet subdivisions, not duple 32nds. With experience, you can tell the difference even at fast tempos like this. If I was doing this transcription, however, I would take a very different approach. I would either write in swing 8ths, 4/4 at q=206, or I would keep the meter the same and make a note up at the top indicating "swing 16ths",...


6

The combined 3-against-2 rhythm is exactly the same as "quarter-note, two 8th-notes, quarter-note" in 3/4 time. Start by practising just the triplets. Then add the other hand and play the second note half-way through the second "beat" of the triplet. Starting with the duplets and trying to add the triplets is harder, so practice it the easy way round. It's ...


6

Yes they are necessary there definitely are note values that cannot be written with mere dots. The one that comes to mind is when you are in 6/8 time and there was a Anacrusis (Upbeat) of a mere quaver. For you to end the piece or phrase you would have to write a dotted crotchet and a Crotchet as one note. There is no way to write this note value without ...


6

If I'm not mistaken, you don't count every single note, because they are really fast and it would be really tough. Instead, you break them in groups of two. You count them as you would count 16th notes (semiquavers), but with two beats on each hit: Image source Another video which states the same: 1 e and a, but two ...


5

For practicing purposes, you can think of it as this in 9/8 which then it would reduce to: It's very easy to play, but another tricky thing is as you mentioned is playing a normal 4/4 bar then fitting this into a measure of 4/4. Practice them separately at first and once you are comfortable with both split the measure of 4/4 into 3 sections then split ...


5

While the typical notes are based on divisions of 2 (i.e. whole, half, quarter, 8th, 16th, ect) using tuples you can have almost any ratio of notes you can utilize to split up a measure. Here is a layout of notes evenly splitting up a measure of 4/4 from whole notes to what you could call 9ths: As you can see all take up a whole measure of 4/4 and ...


5

Feel works, and I believe you can also say style or groove. Rephrasing: Groove. Wikipedia: Groove is the sense of propulsive rhythmic "feel" or sense of "swing" created by the interaction of the music played by a band's rhythm section (drums, electric bass or double bass, guitar, and keyboards). Feel and style also work but aren't as specific.


5

If your audience is getting into the song and dancing (even 'dancing' in a low key way, like toe tapping / clapping), and you mess up the rhythm, you embarrass them - they suddenly look (and feel, mentally) out of time, relative to you. You've betrayed them! Shall we trust you again? Hmmm... I imagine it might be similar if you got an audience to sing along,...


5

If I understand you correctly, it should be something like this:


5

In "traditional" notation, tuplets only occupy a complete number of beats, or a simple fraction (e.g. 1/2, 1/4) of a beat. In "contemporary classical" music, you can write whatever you want to define the rhythm - but as another answer says, your example is pointless since the notes in the tuplet are the same length as ordinary 8th-notes. It may be clearer ...


5

You'll have to represent it with a tie. In 4/4, the simplest and most direct way is to represent it with a quarter note tied to a 16th note as such:


4

Feel is what's typically used then talking about straight vs swing. I've also seen the terms rhythm used to talk about straight vs swing. You could use either when talking about it as these are the typical terms used to compare and contrast them.


4

Wikipedia has a very good breakdown of how notes are named. Here's a snippet of just the names of the ones that are different: American Name British Name double note | breve whole note | semibreve half note | minim quarter note | crotchet eighth note ...


4

A time signature does not affect the duration of any tuple. For example: An 8th note triplet will always take up 1/3 of a quarter note A 16th note triplet will always take up 1/3 of an 8th note A 32nd note triplet will always take up 1/3 of a 16th note An 8th note duplet will always take up 1/2 of a dotted quarter note A 16th note duplet will always take ...



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