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24

Yep, the second one is far better for precisely the reason you say. A general rule is that you shouldn't have dotted-notes that start on an off beat and carry through the next beat. There are exceptions even to this rule, but showing the underlying beat structure of the meter is paramount in the vast majority of situations. Elliott Carter is an example of ...


11

It's a good start that you are aware of the problem because many people never become aware of their timing issues. I suggest you use a simple DAW or a drum computer for producing drum grooves with variable tempo. Choose a comfortable tempo and keep playing a 4-bar vamp which is technically not challenging for you. The latter is important because as long as ...


10

The difference between a sextuplet and two triplets is that the two triplets are clearly substructured into two units. The sextuplet in contrast may either be substructured into three groups of two notes, or it may not be substructured at all. If you have one ascending run (for example) written as sextuplets, chances are that the composer intends you to ...


10

Without a picture, we can just guess, and my guess is that it is referring to a triplet. Something like this for instance: Τhe eighth triplets (second group,second bar) are 3 eighth notes that are being played in one beat; the quarter triplets (first group,second bar) are 3 quarter notes that are being played on two beats etc.


9

I'm sure someone more experienced will come to help, but for now, here are some suggestions: Make use of dissonant chords. In particular, augumented fifths, and diminished major sevenths. In particular I'd just look into the various scale modes (e.g. Lydian) and pick out chords from there. If it's a slow horror song I'd suggest using a Dorian mode for ...


9

A bar's duration can be represented using the whole note No, not always! This is the incorrect assumption you're making. A bar's 'duration' depends on the time signature. So, in a standard 4/4 bar, the bar is 4 quarter notes long. (4 * 1/4...see where this is going?) Alternatively, in a 3/2 bar, the bar is 3 half notes long, or 3 * 1/2! So, whilst a ...


9

You're right it's just a dotted eighth note and a sixteenth note. The bar across the top is called a beam and it is typically used to group smaller notes by beats. For example that pattern in 4/4 would take up one of the four quarters note beats. Grouping them together clearly shows they make one beat in 4/4.


9

Now I know what values notes can have and what they look like and all that, but what I don't get is how you can place somthing... on them? The author is saying "place a sound every X": as in every quarter, or every eight, or every sixteenth. Here are some examples of one measure in 4/4. The grid is divided in sixteenths. Every quarter: Placed on ...


8

If you are referring strictly to music written obeying to traditional rhythmic conventions (with rational time signatures and regular/even division), then your second example is more suitable. Please keep in mind that the first example is not wrong, but the second will make sight-reading much easier, as our own expectations when seeing a piece in 4/4 make us ...


8

Lots. write the count out in pencil on your score, so you're not trying to remember what comes after "three" when you're trying to play and you aren't decoding what pitch goes on which count in realtime. practice just the rhythm clapping it, chanting it, playing it on the tonic note. practice counting aloud with a recording of it to get a feel for it. ...


8

When you first start to record yourself against a strict tempo, that's when you discover the unforgiving world of click tracks.... it's a pain we all have to go through. Things to make life easier... Use some kind of 'drum machine' - anything that can give some 'feel' to the track you are about to lay down, even if it sounds nothing like a drummer, that ...


8

Yes. Now that does not seem like an overly helpful answer. The most important thing is that you feel the importance of the beats and the way they structure the music, and that your feeling is allowed to express yourself in its interpretation. For any instrument, there are a number of ways of putting expressiveness in, and all of those are, of course, ...


8

This sounds similar-to (but more general than) the so-called Speech-to-Song effect, a musical illusion discovered and described by musical psychologist Dr. Diana Deutsch, whereby a repeated phrase of speech comes to sound like music. I think the effect you're discussing is a more general effect, since it involves any repeated sound, and does not necessarily ...


6

Lee is right, but there is a simpler way to think of triplets. Typically we break notes up into sets of 2 (or duples). For example, two half notes make a whole note, two quarter notes make a half notes, two eighth notes make a quarter note etc. All a triplet is is putting 3 notes where 2 normally go. So 3 eighth note triplets will always equal a quarter ...


6

I think triplets are always 2/3 of the duration of the 3 notes regardless of the meter indicated by the time signature. So a triplet of quarter notes will take up the space of a half note (or two quarter notes). A triplet of eighth notes will take up the space of a quarter note (or two eighth notes). ...and so on. I pulled up some useful links in ...


6

As with many questions on this site, the meat of the answer is, practice. What seems difficult now, will seem much easier after practice. However, there are some things you can do: You may need to explicitly count while learning a piece, but once you know the piece's rhythms, you shouldn't need to. So forget about dynamics until you know how the piece ...


6

You will run into this a lot — basically any time the arranger or composer is trying to make it clear that it should sound like more than one voice. In fact you find it everywhere in the keyboard works of JS Bach, where it can be challenging to play the voices clearly. The way to play it in the 3rd measure is as if the first G was a dotted half note tied to ...


6

A whole note takes up a full measure in 16/16, 8/8, 4/4, and 2/2 time only. A whole note has the value of 4 quarter notes or 2 half notes. Since how common 4/4 time is (it is even also referred to as common time) it makes sense that the notes name line up with the use in 4/4. In 3/2 the whole measure is represented by a dotted whole note (i.e. a whole note ...


6

Yes, this is a common problem for anyone who's ever trying to do more than one thing at a time (which for musicians, is quite often). You have to be nice to your brain. Take it slow, painfully, agonizingly slow In fact, don't even play in time. I suggest breaking down the physical motions into their most basic components, and explain what needs to happen ...


5

The question has already been answered correctly by Lee and Dom, but I would like to add some pictures as clarification... I don't have an example right now from an actual piece, though I'm quite sure I've seen something similar. Anyway, it's not hard to come up with your own examples, so here's one which shouldn't even sound that odd: This should at ...


5

If you want a long, sustained note, you could notate it in quite a few different ways. Below are some suggestions. Not all will actually save you time, by cutting notation, though! Each of these is only five bars long, so, obviously, you would only get any time benefit from using these techniques with longer notes. BTW, I haven't used Noteworthy Composer ...


5

Here's a common chart showing how the notes break down: Notice how each row is a full measure in 4/4. The general rule is that a note can span its direct children, or one of its children and one of its nephews. That is, a quarter note can span the 2nd and 3rd eighth notes, but not the 4th and 5th. A dotted note can only borrow from its sibling, not its ...


5

Yes, it is possible to audio quantize in Reaper and all popular DAWs. In general you'll find two different approaches to audio quantize (or a combination of): with or without time stretching. The best results will depend in the material you are modifying. Without time stretching (which is nothing more than cutting a piece of audio and putting it somewhere ...


5

You are right. They have exactly the same rhythmic values. It would make more sense to use the sextuplets unless: the music obviously accents two groups of three notes per beat. the music often intersperses quavers (8th) notes with groups of triplet semiquavers (16th). In either case where you use triplet semiquavers, I would group pairs of them with a ...


5

I notice two differences in the drum beat at this point. One is what Tim mentioned in his answer, the beat takes on a swing rhythm, specifically the 16th notes are swung. The other difference, which I think might be what you are referring to, is that the snare hits start to happen on the upbeats and twice as frequently. This would be called a Double Time ...


5

I am looking for adding a comment in Italian to the notes so that I don't have to write the legatos and staccatos explicitly all over the place (as this part of the piece is quite long). Although I know generally what a minuet is musically, I don't know what "minuet steps" means. I wouldn't associate the phrase with any particular articulation ...


5

He is probably listening to a click track, which is a kind of sophisticated metronome. In concerts like this, most of the music is being played by live musicians, but some parts of the music you are hearing have been pre-recorded in a recording studio. With each piece of music, the drummer is listening to a rhythmic clicking sound which is synchronized to ...


5

how can I practice getting fully in time with the drums on a track It's doable. We had a similar situation in one project, and with some preparation it ended up sounding great. Depending on what you are doing, it might be more trouble than it's worth, but if you really want and/or need to do it, you can. First of all, if the drum part was played by a ...


4

Mark Butler has written a scholarly book on Electronic Dance Music called Unlocking the Groove. In it, he proposes calling these moments "turning the beat around", and abbreviated it TBA. As in, "After an introduction that implies a straight 4/4 pattern, a TBA reveals that it has been syncopated all along." Personally, I think it's an unfortunate term, but ...


4

Led Zeppelin was impressive for many reasons, including the fact that they relied on musicianship and live performance to produce live arrangements of heavily produced and overdubbed songs that everyone knows. They did not use extra players, recorded tracks, or excessive harmonizers to do more than four players could do with their own four mouths, eight ...



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