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27

There was a trick for these that I used all the time based on what the rests look like. The whole rest looks like a hole. The words sound the same so it's a good way to equate them. The half rest looks like a hat and since hat and half both start with the letter 'h' they go together. I like this trick a lot because it associates the rests more with ...


23

They are actually eighth note triplets instead of eighth notes. The alternative notation to this would be to group the eighth notes and rests in threes and put a 3 over them like a standard triplet, but it's easy enough to see that you are fitting 12 equally spaced notes in a measure which end up being eighth note triplets which would kind of screw up the ...


21

A semibreve rest CAN be used in 6/8 time - or ANY time (apart from 4/2 - quite unusual)) to represent one bar's rest. At that point, it isn't actually a 'semibreve', but represents just one bar of that music. It's become a shorthand way of saying "one whole bar rest".


20

In elementary school, I was taught to think of the rest like a raft in water. Since a half rest gets two beats, it's like a raft carrying two people - light enough to float on top of the water: The whole rest, on the other hand, gets four beats (in common time, anyway) and so it's like a raft carrying four people - enough weight such that it sinks down ...


19

The eighth notes in the left hand are all triplets. The ones in the right hand are normal. Note how the note heads line up vertically in measure 4. On a purely technical level, this is incorrect notation. But it's something that can be figured out pretty easily, so I guess Liszt either didn't care or wrote it like that for artistic reasons.


17

There are note values not notateable without ties. For example: A note the length of a crotchet (quarter note) + a semiquaver (sixteenth note) would need to be written with a tie, as there's no notation which says "add a quarter of the length of the note to its duration". We've got "add half" (dotted notes) and "add three quarters" (double dotted notes), ...


16

A semibreve rest is the symbol to be used for "whole-bar rest", regardless of the meter. A whole-bar rest is also distinguished by being written in the middle of the bar rather than being aligned with beat 1 in other staves or voices. This exalted central bar position is otherwise only used by "bourdon" notes carrying multiple syllables in free meter, like ...


14

A whole-note (semibreve) rest hangs D-O-W-N from the line (four letters, so four beats). A half-note rest points U-P from the line (two letters, so two beats).


14

There are 3 separate voices. Voice 1 is the high D-F#-A-G, voice 2 is the middle [eighth rest]-D-A-E-A, and voice 3 is the half notes.


12

Yes it is possible to have a note that is part of a triplet and dotted for example: In this we're using quarter note triplets. Instead of having them all be 3 even quarter note triplets the first one is dotted and the second one is shortened giving us a triplet consisting of a dotted quarter note followed by an eigth note followed by a quarter note to ...


11

Dots in general start to get messy after the first one and can lead to confusion to while sight reading if more than one is used. For the sake of sight reading there are even some syncopated lines where a normal duration like a quarter note or eighth note are represented as ties to show the beat better. Using more than one dot is more theoretical in ...


11

1 2 3, 1 2 3, 1 2 is Calypso rhythm. Although it appears it often has a 4/4 or 8/8 time signature, I have seen it 3+3+2/8. Even with a more regular time signature, you may find it notated with two dotted-crotchets (which shouldn't cross over the secondary beat on to the third crotchet) and a dotted bar-line before the fourth crotchet.


10

It's kind of a strange story. In an early form of notation there were two kinds of notes, long and short. "Longa" means "long" and "breve" means short. So the longest note you are ever likely to see in modern music (twice as long as the longest note you usually see) is a "short". At some point someone needed a shorter note than the short, thus the "half ...


9

Now I know what values notes can have and what they look like and all that, but what I don't get is how you can place somthing... on them? The author is saying "place a sound every X": as in every quarter, or every eight, or every sixteenth. Here are some examples of one measure in 4/4. The grid is divided in sixteenths. Every quarter: Placed on ...


9

It's easier to read when you show the beat structure by using ties: Dotted-eighth_then_sixteenth | tied to an eighth_then_eighth | tied to a sixteenth_then_dotted-eighth | eighth_eighth. I'm showing beaming with the _ and new beats (not beamed together) with |. This way, the underlying beat is always immediately clear, and it's much easier to see how the ...


9

You can say the whole rest hangs below the bar because it's "heavier", so it's value is bigger than the half rest, which sits above the bar, indicating it weighs less, and therefore has half the resting time.


8

Be explicit about it. Time signatures can change rapidly in modern music, so we need to see all beats accounted for. If I'm reading a piece by Mozart and the end of the bar is empty, I'd feel okay about just assuming the rests, but if I'm playing Stravinsky and I see a measure with the wrong number of beats, I don't know what the hell is going on. There ...


8

It's not a triplet. The arc is a phrase mark and the 3 is the fingering of the note on the third beat. Together they kind of look like a triplet, but you can tell it is not a triplet because the arc is continued in the next measure confirming it is a phrase mark.


7

I'm guessing that tied notes have rather taken over. They're easier to read - were there two or three dots?- and the grouping probably is easier to follow. Let's face it, it's simpler to read a crotchet tied to a shorter note than do the sums to work out how long the (double) dotted note needs to be.


7

You are apparently confusing the notational peculiarity of an anacrusis right at the beginning of a piece (which is notated using a partial bar, usually without a bar number of its own) with the musical function of the anacrusis, a short leading phrase before its principal reference point, usually the beginning of a bar. By far most anacruses don't ...


6

My music teacher told me, a 100% criminal hangs, a 50% criminal sits. I have never been able to forget it. (It's snappier in German; ein ganzer Verbrecher hängt, ein halber Verbrecher sitzt.)


6

In your score, if you count the tied notes as a unit (which you should) adds up to 9 notes and there are 9 notes in the original part. Count the notes between the circles as one. The original score is trying to collect all these values into one. The way your score turned out is correct and much more simplified. I doubt you'll come across the first one ...


6

A very common way to notate lyrics where pitch doesn't matter is to just use a single line staff to note the rhythmic hits. In this system everything is the same except there are not distinct pitches per note. Here's an example of this system used to notate The Aggressive Bee: ]1


6

No need to bother too much with notating swing, it makes everything harder to write and to read. Just write once, above of the staff something like: Swing [two quavers] = [a crotchet and quaver triplet] Shuffle [two quavers] = [a dotted quaver and a semiquaver] With nice images instead of the […], obviously.


6

If you establish the rhythm as constant and repetitive then the audience can easily grab onto that and when that constant is disrupted it's like yanking the rug out from underneath their feet. However, if you were playing a piece that was free-flowing in tempo so there wasn't a constant pulse to latch onto then the audience would likely be more oblivious and ...


6

The short answer is yes. Triplet marking is often optional. The composer is basically saying these are triplets, and play all the others the same. The basic rule is if you see three 8th notes that are taking up a single quarter note's place, then you play them as triplets whether they are marked as such or not. Another clue is that 8th notes beamed in ...


6

These are definitely triplet subdivisions, not duple 32nds. With experience, you can tell the difference even at fast tempos like this. If I was doing this transcription, however, I would take a very different approach. I would either write in swing 8ths, 4/4 at q=206, or I would keep the meter the same and make a note up at the top indicating "swing ...


6

Yes they are necessary there definitely are note values that cannot be written with mere dots. The one that comes to mind is when you are in 6/8 time and there was a Anacrusis (Upbeat) of a mere quaver. For you to end the piece or phrase you would have to write a dotted crotchet and a Crotchet as one note. There is no way to write this note value without ...



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