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I play guitar and main vocals for a 3-piece rock band. Needless to say a lot of songs involve a solo and I needed to find a way of not having to song go "empty" when it gets to the solo. Essentially there's a gap in the sound where the rhythm guitar would be, as I move from rhythm playing to solo. I have settled on this : Use a compressor to up the ...


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Led Zeppelin was impressive for many reasons, including the fact that they relied on musicianship and live performance to produce live arrangements of heavily produced and overdubbed songs that everyone knows. They did not use extra players, recorded tracks, or excessive harmonizers to do more than four players could do with their own four mouths, eight ...


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Even though this question has already long been answered, I thought I would show a picture of the note durations in case it helps someone. The time of a single quarter note can be filled many ways: |___________| : One quarter note |_____|_____| : Two eighth notes |___|___|___| : Three triplets |__|__|__|__| : Four sixteenth notes So the rhythm ...


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A whole note takes up a full measure in 16/16, 8/8, 4/4, and 2/2 time only. A whole note has the value of 4 quarter notes or 2 half notes. Since how common 4/4 time is (it is even also referred to as common time) it makes sense that the notes name line up with the use in 4/4. In 3/2 the whole measure is represented by a dotted whole note (i.e. a whole note ...


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A bar's duration can be represented using the whole note No, not always! This is the incorrect assumption you're making. A bar's 'duration' depends on the time signature. So, in a standard 4/4 bar, the bar is 4 quarter notes long. (4 * 1/4...see where this is going?) Alternatively, in a 3/2 bar, the bar is 3 half notes long, or 3 * 1/2! So, whilst a ...


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Actually quite simple... The notes are tied, meaning you hold the Bflat-G while your other fingers play the other notes. When you come to the last G in the third measure, you play it again then hold it down just like you did the first time. Sometimes we over-think stuff, making it more complicated than it really is. :)


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Trying to keep time with a metronome is not for everyone. People who play in bands may find it easier than bedroom players, but by and large, most players would prefer to play along to a drum track. Especially band players, for whom this would be the norm on stage.Click tracks are used by pros, not to keep them in time as such, but to reference the recording ...


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My understanding is that where there are drums, they are recorded first (with a click track possibly) and then the other musicians record their parts listening to the drums. That would be highly unusual, unless you're using a sequenced drum part. When a band records, it's most common that the other musicians record their rhythm parts (which may ...


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When you first start to record yourself against a strict tempo, that's when you discover the unforgiving world of click tracks.... it's a pain we all have to go through. Things to make life easier... Use some kind of 'drum machine' - anything that can give some 'feel' to the track you are about to lay down, even if it sounds nothing like a drummer, that ...



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