New answers tagged

1

If by accents you mean simply the strong beats (i.e. the beats that you would tap with your foot), then it is always 3-6-8-10-12 in soleares. If, however, you mean "golpes" then these have little to do with the structure of the compas at all. They are used as accentuations of a note or chord, and therefore can be used anywhere (in the case of syncopation for ...


5

These are definitely triplet subdivisions, not duple 32nds. With experience, you can tell the difference even at fast tempos like this. If I was doing this transcription, however, I would take a very different approach. I would either write in swing 8ths, 4/4 at q=206, or I would keep the meter the same and make a note up at the top indicating "swing ...


-4

I have got the same issue some times ago and after obsessively seeking an answer I realized human brain is not able to distinguish between those (in 110 bpm) :D But the common literature uses the 2/3 1/3 split. however it is literally indistinguishable but it is more common to use it. so don't get obsessed over it, you're transcription is absolutely fine. ...


0

Here's a nice video on how to create your own exercise for any polyrhythm


1

I would hold a slightly different opinion to those already given and say the proper notation is 12 in the time of eight which is played the same as four triplets but still this is 12 in the time of eight. The person that did the transcription probably felt the marking for twelve in the time of 8 would be to hard and left you to scratch you head instead.


12

In support of the other answers here, I have re-notated this passage in your example to emphasize the triplets. This is the exact same passage of music (unless I have made a typo or two) but using extra symbols to make it more explicit. Note that in measure 4 you are required to play "two against three": your right hand is in a duple rhythm while your left ...


19

The eighth notes in the left hand are all triplets. The ones in the right hand are normal. Note how the note heads line up vertically in measure 4. On a purely technical level, this is incorrect notation. But it's something that can be figured out pretty easily, so I guess Liszt either didn't care or wrote it like that for artistic reasons.


23

They are actually eighth note triplets instead of eighth notes. The alternative notation to this would be to group the eighth notes and rests in threes and put a 3 over them like a standard triplet, but it's easy enough to see that you are fitting 12 equally spaced notes in a measure which end up being eighth note triplets which would kind of screw up the ...


7

You are apparently confusing the notational peculiarity of an anacrusis right at the beginning of a piece (which is notated using a partial bar, usually without a bar number of its own) with the musical function of the anacrusis, a short leading phrase before its principal reference point, usually the beginning of a bar. By far most anacruses don't ...


2

These note values only make sense if both of them are triplets. Sometimes depending on the means of notation marking a measure as triplets can be a tiresome task. This may necessitate that triplet markings are not used every time. The grouping of the triplets also give you the indication of the triplets. They say to you here you have three notes in the time ...


6

The short answer is yes. Triplet marking is often optional. The composer is basically saying these are triplets, and play all the others the same. The basic rule is if you see three 8th notes that are taking up a single quarter note's place, then you play them as triplets whether they are marked as such or not. Another clue is that 8th notes beamed in ...


2

Off-beat Syncopation. This Wikipedia article has a brief discussion on Syncopation. Notice that he doesn't do it on every measure, making it an effective use of the technique.


1

I see that all the previous answers just try to answer how to work around the problem of having odd beats and yet mantaining the "pendulum" (up down up down ...) pattern of strumming. However you don't really need to strum using this pattern. In fact if you are playing in an odd time you shouldn't. You can just choose a strumming pattern so that the ...



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