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6 | V ^ ^ v ^ ^ | 8 | 1 2 3 4 5 6 | 6/8 compound time can be thought of as duple meter consisting of two beats to the measure, where the dotted quarter note gets the beat. 6/8 is just a notational simplification -- if Carl Orff's time signatures had caught on we might call this time signature 2/q. (a two on top of a dotted quarter note). I consider an ...


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If you don't care about software costs, then check out Ableton Live. Its a fully featured DAW that will allow you to jam along with loops and also record and arrange your results.


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You want to google "auto accompainment software". People seem to dig this: http://www.digibandapp.com/ Also: http://www.1manband.nl/ If you want something more advanced and beyond what your Ketron does, you may want to try out Ableton Live and the like: https://www.ableton.com/en/trial/ As the name suggest, it is a live performance-oriented DAW that ...


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I am rather sceptical of that claim since changes between rhythms like 4/2 and 3/1 are rather old practice and I distinctly remember some Missa from Josquin Desprez where there were there was one voice with three notes over 2 or even 4 bars. I'd be rather surprised if baroque composers fell apart with smaller subdivisions where things actually become ...


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A good idea is to start with the note that is the shortest and make that one beat and count the other notes in relation to the smallest notes. So for instance if you are in 4/4 time and the shortest notes in the piece is quavers you make the quavers one beat, the crotchets 2, minims 4 and semi breves 8. It is not a perfect method. You run the risk of ...


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I would recommend getting a copy of Hindemith's book: Elementary Training for Musicians In the early chapters he has masses of exercises in sight-reading rhythmic patterns, both as single-line rhythms, and also more complex ones where you have to tap one rhythm while playing another rhythm (very useful for pianists). The book is also extremely useful for ...


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It will depend a little on the instrument. For example, rhythm guitar with lots of strumming will be slightly different from picking out a melody on, say, a clarinet. Yes, the rhythmic pattern will be the same, but its execution is different, as is reading chord symbols as opposed to dots. Tapping a foot is always good, as is internalizing the basic beat ...


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For jazz guitar there is a standard book by William G. Leavitt called Melodic Rhythms for Guitar. It has lots of examples of so-called "rhythm groups" of increasing complexity. Playing through this book greatly improves sight-reading of rhythms. And this is also the clue: there's no shortcut. You have to sight-read in order to learn it. In my opinion you ...


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At the risk of getting slated for extending the subject :-) Look at the 5th bar of the melody. The bar in 10/8 time. This works beautifully IF you take notice of the tempo indication, dotted quarter = 50. If, however, you choose too fast a tempo (as many do) it becomes an awkward oddity and you'll probably give up on it and slip back into 12/8. And, all ...



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