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OK, first lets address the most basic part of your question - There is a mathematical difference between 4/4 and 12/8. So no you cannot treat it as 4/4. You could treat it as 3/2, but I'll get to that in a bit. I'm thinking (hoping) you actually know this but mis-communicated. For those who don't understand the math of music, the time signature is ...


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As long as you are singing in time with what you heard coming out of your speakers/headphones, it doesn't matter if the resulting recording puts these tracks out of sync. It's entirely normal - you just shift the start of tracks as necessary to align them, which should be pretty trivial; I had to do this when recording separate piano parts for a dozen ...


3

You are hearing the device's latency - the amount of time it takes to process the signal in & again out of the computer. You can reduce the latency, depending on DAW software, by reducing the buffer size used for the interface - but this is at a cost of increased processing power required. The usual solution is simply to not listen to the throughput ...


4

Try recording either the output of monitor speakers along with your singing, or at least rerecording the signal you are getting on your headphones on a separate track with your singing. Is your singing off-time with regard to the rerecorded track? If so, it is your singing. If it isn't, then you are having latency. Figure out whether your soundcard ...


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For popular music, you can determine the time signature by listening to the rhythm section, especially the drum kit and bass. These two instruments typically carry the musical pulse. You can figure out the time signature’s note value (lower number) by listening to the subdivisions of the pulse, and you can figure out the time signature’s note count (upper ...


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This answer is a bit of personal color to complement, perhaps, user15590. I'm an adult piano learner, building on music I learned in school as a child. Based on my early education, I came to piano expecting that 'a beat was a beat', except, perhaps, in some soppy sloppy playing of an overly romantic nature. My piano teacher, a woman of endless patience, ...


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Yes. Now that does not seem like an overly helpful answer. The most important thing is that you feel the importance of the beats and the way they structure the music, and that your feeling is allowed to express yourself in its interpretation. For any instrument, there are a number of ways of putting expressiveness in, and all of those are, of course, ...


3

When you play in 4/4 time, which is the most common, beat 1 is emphasised by playing it a bit louder than the other three. Often beat 3 is also a bit louder. So - 1 is pressed hardest, 3 the next level down, with 2 and 4 the relatively quiet ones. Usually this is quite subtle, but sometimes when learning a new piece, it's helpful to emphasise beat 1 to keep ...


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I like to approach this kind of question from the perspective of a composer: considering I want to write for an instrument that does not traditionally use notation, but will be played presumably by someone who is familiar with it, how best can I communicate what I am looking for to this person? I definitely agree with Kevin that adapting existing notational ...


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Since it's rhythm I would suggest adapting drum tab to your purpose. Something like: or: HH|x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-|| S|----o-------o---|| B|o-------o-------|| 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + Whatever you're most comfortable with. Just replace the "HH" and other voices with an abbreviation for whatever effect you want to notate.



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