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2

I like Topo Morto's answer, but here's what I'd like to add: To learn to feel and play any new style of music, the best thing you can do is listen. That is, after all, almost certainly how you first became familiar with what you're already used to. Try to find CDs or records (if that's what you're into) of or purchase digital copies online of albums or ...


2

Your teacher was right. You do have to count. It is essential because as the music becomes more complex or more parts are added your ear can deceive you. I hate to say it but until you can read without tapping you are probably going to have to put yourself in beginner mode. I'm intimately familiar with this because I played the cello for 20 years, played ...


0

Music is structured sound - while it usually has meter, there's no need for music to have time signature or tempo markings to exist. Time signature is just a tool to help everyone involved in the music making process. The best practice is to choose the one that most simplifies your music thoughts. For example: The composer chooses the time signature to ...


0

Dom is absolutely correct on the musical end. My question is more concerned upon technique and common/good practice, thanks though! :) From a best practices standpoint, I would say the 70bpm setting is the correct one. If you are just composing in the software, nothing else, it wouldn't matter. If you want to start syncing to drum machine plugins, ...


3

Tempo and Time Signatures really don't have anything to do with each other. A time signature is how you group, count, and accent beats and tempo is how fast the beat is. Changing the tempo as you are doing does not affect the time signature at all. 3/4 or 3/8 or even 3/2 will group the beats in the ONE-two-three pattern you want and as a composer the tempo ...


1

The beat exists without any notes being played. Imagine the bandleader saying "and ah one, and ah two and ah one two three four" - the next "one" is the downbeat marking (nominally) the beginning of the piece. Time passes, the pulse continues, but there need not be any notes "placed" or "put" on any of those "beats." I think you need an understanding of time ...


9

Now I know what values notes can have and what they look like and all that, but what I don't get is how you can place somthing... on them? The author is saying "place a sound every X": as in every quarter, or every eight, or every sixteenth. Here are some examples of one measure in 4/4. The grid is divided in sixteenths. Every quarter: Placed on ...


0

It does take practice to get the feel of the rhythm. But if you can listen to a song and tap your finger to the beat on a table, then you have the skills needed to learn to play the guitar and keep the rhythm. The strumming pattern you use will have an effect on your ability to maintain an appropriate rhythm for a particular song. On many patterns you may ...


1

Practice clapping along to music. Start with dance music with a heavy clear 4/4 beat (if you're not sure, ask someone to find you some). Clap along to the bass drum and count to four as you do it, so you feel the first beat of each bar. Also try clapping to the off-beat -- beats 2 and 4 of each bar. Or pick a drum sound and clap to that even if it's a more ...


5

how can I practice getting fully in time with the drums on a track It's doable. We had a similar situation in one project, and with some preparation it ended up sounding great. Depending on what you are doing, it might be more trouble than it's worth, but if you really want and/or need to do it, you can. First of all, if the drum part was played by a ...


0

You can try using percussive strumming on the muted strings. That always helps me in attaining fullness of tone. If that is not enough you can consider some sort of harmonizer pedal that adds one or two voices a certain interval above and below the root note.


3

It's always good to have the rhythmic feel of a piece/style in your bones as (or even before) you try to learn it. If you're really not familiar with the style, play the music around the house, and dance to it - or at least practice clapping on the 2 and the 4! Think of the music swinging to and fro, with the 1 on the "left", 2 on the "right", 3 on the left, ...



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