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1

Ah, I remember this phenomenon – or at least I think what I'm remembering is what you're describing – from learning to improvise. What I recall is that the bad rhythm moments happened when I was trying to just throw a whole bunch of notes out there really fast. Maybe it was because I was nervous, and I was just throwing a bunch of pitches at the wall to ...


0

If you wish to improve your timing (and subsequently, your internal ability to distinguish and think ahead in terms of time signatures) you should practice with a metronome. Sometimes, the backing tracks can confuse the ear because there is so much going on in them. A simple click metronome may not be as exciting as playing with a backing track but it ...


2

The answer is "No." Everything can be counted. It's like Science - the rules of traditional physics breakdown at the quantum level, so you need new rules to understand the different physics. Counting / rhythms operate the same way. The "magic" system that allows everything to be counted is the Indian Carnatic System which allows for any number of ...


0

Swing doesn't affect eight notes as such but changes the meter of the bar. Any note longer than a sixteenth that falls on the 'and' is delayed. Typically, this happens with eights but it can also happen to quarters which start on the 'and'. Same for dotted quarters. Sixteenth (or shorter) are exceptions: they remain straight and are never swung (when eights ...


7

I'm sure someone more experienced will come to help, but for now, here are some suggestions: Make use of dissonant chords. In particular, augumented fifths, and diminished major sevenths. In particular I'd just look into the various scale modes (e.g. Lydian) and pick out chords from there. If it's a slow horror song I'd suggest using a Dorian mode for ...


2

The existing answers have a lot of good advice, especially as regards transitioning from counting the beat to feeling the beat. As an intermediate step, you might tapping your foot in time instead of counting. As you become more comfortable, you can progress from tapping the entire foot to just tapping a toe -- which no one will even know you're doing if ...


0

If you play along with the song, I don't really think there is any need for you to use a metronome. You have the song to keep the tempo for you. If you try to learn the song while reading a sheet music or in a way you don't have anything to keep your tempo steady, you should always use a metronome. It is the only way you can be sure you keep your tempo ...


1

A metronome is simply a timekeeper. It does get used for technical practice such as scales and arpeggios, which, for exam purposes, need to be played in military fashion. Apart from that, there are not loads of songs which use consecutive notes from a key (scales) for more than a few notes. So being capable of running up and down scales to a ticking ...


0

learn about beatmapping and the beatmapper wizard in SONY ACID Studio..works great for me! Stretch and fold your drum tracks to match the metronome and presto you can record other tracks onto it with ease!


5

Yes, it is possible to audio quantize in Reaper and all popular DAWs. In general you'll find two different approaches to audio quantize (or a combination of): with or without time stretching. The best results will depend in the material you are modifying. Without time stretching (which is nothing more than cutting a piece of audio and putting it somewhere ...


5

You will run into this a lot — basically any time the arranger or composer is trying to make it clear that it should sound like more than one voice. In fact you find it everywhere in the keyboard works of JS Bach, where it can be challenging to play the voices clearly. The way to play it in the 3rd measure is as if the first G was a dotted half note tied to ...


1

I guess you're asking about the G note which is written as held for 2 bars, along with the Bb, except that you're told to play the G again, at the end of bar 3, while it's still pressed down. It's not written too well, perhaps simply, to show that the Bb+G are one voice, while the tune is another. To do it correctly, maybe the G should not be shown as held ...


3

On the third measure, you play the chord, and hold it for 3.5/4 of the measure. At the last eighth of the measure, you play G again and on the 1st beat of the 4th measure you play the chord again (thus you also play the note G again). On the 11th measure, you play the chord, then you play the notes that follow: Bb, G, Bb, C, Bb and then on the next measure ...


4

Lots. write the count out in pencil on your score, so you're not trying to remember what comes after "three" when you're trying to play and you aren't decoding what pitch goes on which count in realtime. practice just the rhythm clapping it, chanting it, playing it on the tonic note. practice counting aloud with a recording of it to get a feel for it. ...


5

As with many questions on this site, the meat of the answer is, practice. What seems difficult now, will seem much easier after practice. However, there are some things you can do: You may need to explicitly count while learning a piece, but once you know the piece's rhythms, you shouldn't need to. So forget about dynamics until you know how the piece ...


2

The approach you are using now is to learn play the rhythm by seeing it visually. You can also come at the problem from the other direction: learn to play the rhythm by ear, then learn what that pattern looks like on the page. For me, the second approach is much, much easier for complex or off-beat rhythms. Find or make a recording of the challenging ...


0

Count each beat with your mouth. In a 4/4 measure you would say 1 2 3 4. For eighths, add an and (+) in between, counting 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +. Then, add sixteenths. The second sixteenth is e and the fourth one is a, counting 1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a. Triplets are 1 + a 2 + a etc. For more complex tuplets, find a word with that number of syllables ...



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