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2

Lots. write the count out in pencil on your score, so you're not trying to remember what comes after "three" when you're trying to play and you aren't decoding what pitch goes on which count in realtime. practice just the rhythm clapping it, chanting it, playing it on the tonic note. practice counting aloud with a recording of it to get a feel for it. ...


5

As with many questions on this site, the meat of the answer is, practice. What seems difficult now, will seem much easier after practice. However, there are some things you can do: You may need to explicitly count while learning a piece, but once you know the piece's rhythms, you shouldn't need to. So forget about dynamics until you know how the piece ...


2

The approach you are using now is to learn play the rhythm by seeing it visually. You can also come at the problem from the other direction: learn to play the rhythm by ear, then learn what that pattern looks like on the page. For me, the second approach is much, much easier for complex or off-beat rhythms. Find or make a recording of the challenging ...


0

Count each beat with your mouth. In a 4/4 measure you would say 1 2 3 4. For eighths, add an and (+) in between, counting 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +. Then, add sixteenths. The second sixteenth is e and the fourth one is a, counting 1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a. Triplets are 1 + a 2 + a etc. For more complex tuplets, find a word with that number of syllables ...


0

It's subjective. Some people just seem to have inbuilt good timing, others, who've played for years, don't seem to notice a skipped beat, an added beat, slowing down, etc. And for those, a metronome probably won't help. I've tried drum machines with them, and they didn't help either.Generally they're folks that play by themselves for long periods. It ...


0

You're definitely on the right track. Modifying the tempo of whatever you're working on is crucial to developing your skills as a guitar player. Playing with a click (the metronome) is very important in developing what I call your "inner metronome". If you can't play on beat, then when you play with a band or have to perform by yourself your tempo will be ...


3

There's a lot of difference between 'noodling' or 'widdling' and improvisation. One can use, say, a pentatonic and noodle over a three chord wonder all day long, playing long extemporisations without any mistakes being apparent. This can, however, be a great point to take off from.Only using, say, 4 of the notes, play a motif, perhaps 6 notes long. Over, for ...


4

You can establish a theme that you come back to again and again, and then use as a jumping off point for further improvisation. The theme doesn’t have to be long or complicated, and it’s probably better if it’s not. Think of the theme as a chorus, and think of your improvisational stretches as verse. As long and wild as your improvisational stretches may be, ...


0

Playing Johann Strauss Waltzes will assist in acquiring the "body feel" of the three half notes against two dotted half notes, sometimes called "hemiola."


0

I would be curious as to see a real life example as to why this would happen. Time signatures at there core tell you how many beats there is in a bar and also what each beat consists of. When you take 3/4 time. It tells you in essence that we have three beats of crotchets. If you would take this and make a compound time signature you would basically put a ...


1

Think of 9/8 like this: 3/8 + 3/8 + 3/8 So therefore 9/8 is basically a combination of 3 8th-note triplets. If you want the original triplets, you will have to go for 16th-note triplets for each of the 9 8th notes.


5

The question has already been answered correctly by Lee and Dom, but I would like to add some pictures as clarification... I don't have an example right now from an actual piece, though I'm quite sure I've seen something similar. Anyway, it's not hard to come up with your own examples, so here's one which shouldn't even sound that odd: This should at ...


1

I suspect that there might be some confusion in the question. As I see things, 6/8 is a way of notating a 2/4 rhythm whilst showing that there is a triplet beat; 9/8 is a way of notating 3/4. I came to this backwards, hearing songs which I considered to be in 12/8 then discovering that they were notated in 4/4. One can count songs both ways as the rhythm ...


6

Lee is right, but there is a simpler way to think of triplets. Typically we break notes up into sets of 2 (or duples). For example, two half notes make a whole note, two quarter notes make a half notes, two eighth notes make a quarter note etc. All a triplet is is putting 3 notes where 2 normally go. So 3 eighth note triplets will always equal a quarter ...


6

I think triplets are always 2/3 of the duration of the 3 notes regardless of the meter indicated by the time signature. So a triplet of quarter notes will take up the space of a half note (or two quarter notes). A triplet of eighth notes will take up the space of a quarter note (or two eighth notes). ...and so on. I pulled up some useful links in ...



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