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I'd like to mention the possibility that this happens because of the recording process and is not an intentional 'shift of meter'. Most modern pop music is recorded to a click, and even when it isn't there is almost always a scratch guitar or drum take laid down first to serve as a guide for the overdubs. Sometimes the instrument/track that served as a ...


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The best way I've found is to have a solid rhythm section that knows what to do. Primarily the drummer. If he plays a swing rhythm, basically on hi-hat/cymbals, that sets the groove. As a bass player will be playing on the beats more than the offbeats, he won't swing until he puts something like ghost notes on the offbeats as well. But not constantly. The ...


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•Does this "swing rule" apply to 3/16 rests + 1/16 notes as well as 3/16 notes + 1/16 notes, even though only the latter is shown in the example notation next to the tempo? (I thought yes) Yes, it applies to any combination of notes and rests. •What is the real, correct name of this "swing rule" (so we can Google it)? No idea, but this notation ...


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Your interpretation is correct. The triplets would not change the general swing feel with the 16th notes. It is just a notational convention. Here are some references for further study: Music Theory - Swing Swing (Jazz Performance Style)


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Honestly you should bring in some tennis balls and make a game out of it. I've taught this with eurhythmics before. Basically have people walk to a beat and start bouncing the ball on the 8th note, and then after they do that comfortably have them do the same, only swing it. You can work with whatever rhythms you need in this way and it feels kind of silly ...


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If you're playing straight and switch to playing swing, the 'and's move but the strong beats don't. It might be that the players who are trying to play swung are pushing the strong beats around too, which would be disconcerting to the other players. I'd suggest an exercise where everyone plays the same line (a fragment of a scale for instance) first ...


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The only way I am aware of improving (or practicing) swing feel is to play with a metronome but set it so the click is on the 2 and 4. Emily Remler goes through it in her tutorial videos. I have no idea how this would translate to a group jam though!


4

Assuming these are informal jams, you just don't have the authority to fire incompetents. I think the only possibility is to endure the fact that the material will not be played correctly. But do at least point out what "swing" means when they try to "correct" those who are playing it correctly. Is it tactless to teach someone the truth?


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If what you are looking for is accuracy in subdividing beats into 3,4,5,etc. then it might be worth looking at the Scriabin Etudes. They are not at all easy but there are lots of complex rythmic ideas there.


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Some more examples worth mentioning: Doobie Brothers "Minute by Minute" -- The percussion tells us 13 seconds into the song that the incredibly fast tempo keyboard fade-in in 2/4 is really a moderately-paced 6/8 in disguise. Genesis "Man on the Corner" -- The synth percussion that starts the song seems out of sync with the keyboard intro a few seconds ...


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This doesn't exactly answer your question, but I think there is an important point to make. At this point in my studies, I was getting all of my examples from the standard literature. It's my strong opinion that exercise books like this be kept to a minimum, and not be used at all once someone is sufficiently advanced (such as they would be by the time they ...


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In a comment to the OP, thrig mentioned Temperley's book "Music and Probability," and I thought I'd give some extra context. This is not a full answer to the question, but, depending on how far you want to go with this and what your goals are (scholarly, or just to use the software), this could be a good start: Longuet-Higgins and Steedman published some ...


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If I'm not mistaken, you don't count every single note, because they are really fast and it would be really tough. Instead, you break them in groups of two. You count them as you would count 16th notes (semiquavers), but with two beats on each hit: Image source Another video which states the same: 1 e and a, but two ...


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You'll have to represent it with a tie. In 4/4, the simplest and most direct way is to represent it with a quarter note tied to a 16th note as such:


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I think what you are picking up on is that music is more than just a collection of notes. It also has to do with the communication of emotions and feelings in audio form. You see this often when you compare how children play music to how the masters play it. You may easily find some young wunderkind in the world which has good mastery of there instrument, ...


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I think what you are talking about can be refered to generically as "interpretation", but other words could be used too (perhaps with slightly specific meanings), like "sentiment", "feeling", and yes, "vibe" too. Part of that is the execution of a musical phrase as a single unit, that you can refer to as "singing" the melody, as opposed to playing each ...


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The trick is simply to flatten it: 1 2 1 2 1 * * * * * * * * * * * * 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 | | | | | v v v v v * * * * * * * * * The 2 of ...


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The trick is simply to flatten it: 1 2 1 2 1 * * * * * * * * * * * * 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 | | | | | v v v v v * * * * * * * * * The 2 of ...


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The learning pathway which makes the most sense to me: understand intellectually how it works be able to play it slowly be able to play it faster be able to feel the two rhythms independently I've written an article about two against three rhythms on the piano with that approach in mind: http://jeromejaglale.com/blog/...


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It sounds as if you have conceived a song that doesn't fit the standard pop song format of 8 or 16 bar sections, with the same bar length throughout. That's fine. Plenty of songs don't. Stop trying to force your song into a rigid structure and find out just what it DOES do. Maybe there are 7, 9 or 13-bar sections. Maybe some bars have 4 beats, some ...


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Start counting at the first heavy beat, and keep counting till you reach the next heavy beat. It may not be apparent straight away, but when you think you have the magic number, count through the song. If it fits, you've most likely solved it. You may have to try with a slow and a fast count, as some time sigs are compound, like this one It could be a slow 4,...


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Technically speaking, you can't ever say for certain until you see the original score (if there even is one) as determined by the composer; a piece could literally be written in an infinite number of time signatures. As such, we have to make these decisions based on a knowledge of prior practice and on what makes the most practical sense. So, let's look at ...


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I'd put it in 6/8, due to the triplets feel, but the phrasing kind of repeats every two bars, thus two lots of 3/8, making 6/8. Why /8? Well, it's fairly quick, so I'd write it as quavers instead of crotchets. There is a recent question on that subject - quavers to play give the feeling that they are quicker - I know it depends on the tempo mark, but ...



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