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Most tuplets are not affected by the time signature. However, two duplet eighths in 3/8 will cover 3/8, two duplet eighths in 5/16 will cover 5/16. A septole eighth in 4/4 will likely cover a whole measure unless the composer is from the school that n-toles may only be shorter than regular notes (but then how to explain duplets?). In cases where you have ...


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A time signature does not affect the duration of any tuple. For example: An 8th note triplet will always take up 1/3 of a quarter note A 16th note triplet will always take up 1/3 of an 8th note A 32nd note triplet will always take up 1/3 of a 16th note An 8th note duplet will always take up 1/2 of a dotted quarter note A 16th note duplet will always take ...


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For your two examples in particular we have a very precise naming convention in german. Let's see if this works in english, too. 'Achtel-Feeling' vs. 'Triolet-Feeling' As you can see the word 'Feeling' is very german ;-))) In english this would be STRAIGHT- FEEL vs. SWING-FEEL... Groove is the groove of a LP(LongPlay, Schelack, Record) and just means ...


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It's kind of a strange story. In an early form of notation there were two kinds of notes, long and short. "Longa" means "long" and "breve" means short. So the longest note you are ever likely to see in modern music (twice as long as the longest note you usually see) is a "short". At some point someone needed a shorter note than the short, thus the "half ...


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Wikipedia has a very good breakdown of how notes are named. Here's a snippet of just the names of the ones that are different: American Name British Name double note | breve whole note | semibreve half note | minim quarter note | crotchet eighth note ...


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Usually the answer is to slow down and focus on a sense of physical proficiency. Find the speed at which you can play along, then slightly increase to the point at which you have only slight difficulty. Improving may take time, so I recommend just accepting that and being patient. Try repeating phrases, perhaps taken from a larger piece you're playing so ...


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I teach some really young kids drum, so we've spent a fair amount of time on the very basics. Make sure you know the notes and how they relate. I have each student make a set of flash cards, and then I pick two at random. First, we start with "larger" and "smaller". Then we go to level two - how many of the smaller go into the larger ("There are two ...


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Set the metronome to a bpm that you fell comfortable. Try 70 bpm for instance. For starters, consider each beat of the metronome as a quarter note. So, if you want to play a quarter, it will last as long as one beat. If you want to play a half, the note will last as two beats; if you want to play eighths, the note will last half a beat, meaning that there ...


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A very common way to notate lyrics where pitch doesn't matter is to just use a single line staff to note the rhythmic hits. In this system everything is the same except there are not distinct pitches per note. Here's an example of this system used to notate The Aggressive Bee: ]1


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I've certainly seen some notation being used for chords that can be used for lyrics, too. Basically, you add the bars, and then you divide each bar into an equal number of intervals, usually 2, 4 or 8. If then a syllable is longer that this basic unit, you add -- after it. To give an example: | Yes-ter-day -- | -- | -- -- All my | trou-bles seemed so | far ...


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If I understand your question correctly, the answer is: "prolation". There are two concepts with rhythm, meter - the number of beats in a measure and prolation - the number of subdivisions of the meter. Straight 8's are duple meter, duple prolation and Swing 8's are duple meter triple prolation. Due to the church origins of these terms, where 3 was divine - ...


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Feel works, and I believe you can also say style or groove. Rephrasing: Groove. Wikipedia: Groove is the sense of propulsive rhythmic "feel" or sense of "swing" created by the interaction of the music played by a band's rhythm section (drums, electric bass or double bass, guitar, and keyboards). Feel and style also work but aren't as specific.


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Feel is what's typically used then talking about straight vs swing. I've also seen the terms rhythm used to talk about straight vs swing. You could use either when talking about it as these are the typical terms used to compare and contrast them.



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