Hot answers tagged

19

The key change you are describing is known as a Chromatic Mediant Relationship. This type of modulation rose to prominence in the Romantic Period and has been used by composers and musicians ever since. Chromatic Mediant Relationships are ones in which the roots or tonal centers of the keys are a non-diatonic 3rd apart. If diatonic (within the key), it ...


14

Perhaps it was EBow. It amplifies string vibrations (using magnetic fields) providing very controllable feedback effect which allows to get very smooth and sustained sound. Also check out this video on Youtube. Although it is old it demonstrates very wide range of possibilities of this device.


14

Off the top of my head... the fret spacing is tighter there, so fingering a fast passage may be easier than in the lower position the timbre of the notes is mellower and 'bluesier', which may be the desired effect open strings can sound different to fretted notes, so it can be desirable to avoid open strings. Muting technique is also different with open ...


10

You were right on when you said that this chord "toys with switching to the minor scale." In classical musical analysis, the major chord built on the flattened third is considered a "borrowed chord", a chord that is borrowed from the minor version of the key. In Roman numberal analysis, it is written exactly as you would expect: ♭III. Like many other ...


9

Two basic philosophies. First is, set everything at 12 o'clock (halfway) and adjust everything up or down until it sounds right. Second is, dime everything (all the way) and back things down until it sounds right. If it doesn't already. There are other things to consider. A common metal thing is to max the bass and treble and pull back on ("scoop") the ...


9

My favourite rockin' sound is a good old Fender Rhodes, overdriven so it starts to break up when you play chords or when you really dig into a note. I've played at a couple of parties with just this sound, and it does a wonderful job of "filling the room" as you say. As for playing style, I find that playing a lot of open fifths helps. I've heard guitarists ...


9

I don't think there is a definite answer here. I have been in bands where all the members act as 'leaders' at the same time and at bands where one is the leader. In most bands I know, there is a leader. There are pros and cons in both of them. When everyone in the band is a leader, thus making it a democracy, it is hard and time consuming to decide what ...


8

I think that the differences you mentioned have more to do with the size of the groups involved than their preference for classical or rock music. Also, I'm willing to wager that there is as much diversity in terms of goals among members of the same category (rock or classical) as there is between the two. You mentioned orchestral music, but that is only a ...


8

One other thing that took me MANY years to realize. The best EQ and tone settings to please your ear in a room by yourself are going to be surprisingly different from the ideal tone when you play with other instruments, and especially when recording. For example, the best guitar sound when a keyboard / synth is playing chords is often much more treble than ...


7

Without precise time alignment, trying to provide bass from multiple sources could lead to interference patterns which would cause the low end sound to be way too loud in some parts of the room and almost nonexistent in others. Even if that weren't a problem, high passing the signal before sending it to the mains means that the mains have more power ...


6

Adding to @Casey Rule's answer: the set of chords that generally works with a key are (in C) C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am and Bo, with their 7ths if appropriate. There is also, in theory, the set of chords from the 'parallel' minor.In this case, Cm - (relative major being Eb). This gives the chords from Eb major - Eb, Fm, Gm, Ab, Bb, Cm and Do.There's now a far wider ...


6

This effect is called volume swell. It's achieved by fading in notes using your volume knob or a volume pedal.


6

To sing with the type intensity you hear from singers such as Dave Grohl without blowing out your vocal chords or making your throat raw requires both proper technique and some stamina (as well as certain precautions). First let's talk about stamina. Singing involves many muscles in the face, mouth and throat but the most important muscles used in ...


5

There are a few examples of screaming in Western classical music, but only as a coloristic effect; I am not aware of any compositions where it is used on a sustained basis the way it is in heavy metal. Some of these are when the music imitates styles such as blues or rock. Some examples: There are some primal screams in the first movement of Orff's ...


5

Wow - that song has a ton of words! And as you said, there is not really a chorus that repeats over and over. This one would be a challenge for anyone and it will take some persistent practice. Storing these lyrics into long term memory will best be accomplished by spacing the learning process over a longer period of time rather than cramming it in in a ...


5

Just a bit more info on cyco130's answer : 'Tis indeed a volume swell effect, and is an electric guitar. The technique is to pluck the note with the volume turned down, then bring the volume in - either via a volume pedal or using the volume control on the guitar. Some guitars make this easier because the volume control is easily reachable from where your ...


5

First of all, there is more than one way to play almost any riff, solo, or musical phrase on a guitar. Unlike a keyboard instrument, the same note in the same octave can be played in multiple places on the guitar. There are many reasons why a guitarist might choose one position to play a certain riff over another position. Sometimes it has to do with ...


5

An E chord COULD be used as the dominant of the relative minor. But in this case I think he's just shifted the tonal centre up a third as a contrast, because it sounds good- after all, that's what he SAID he's done! There's nothing wrong in you saying so too. It WOULD be wrong to invent a connection with a relative minor that never actually arrives.


4

Just to add to the great post from RC - there's lots of imagery in that song. In cases like that, one thing I sometimes do is visualise the scene that the song is describing. Then when singing the song, all I have to do is get the picture in my head again, say what's going on in the scene, and out come the lyrics (hopefully!)


4

I think this is kind of a broad question, and when you say screams in rock music it's kind of a different definition to how it is used everywhere else. I think of everything from Deep Purple to Iron maiden, opeth and beyond in rock, but in everything else it can have multiple meanings. When I started searching it seemed that Bel Canto has some early ...


4

The drum kit does not feature much in Traditional Irish music. Why not sit down at your kit with headphones and play along with some of the pogues numbers or whatever songs you'd like to be able to play? There are apps and software to slow the tune down so you can figure out what the drummer is doing. But as you say, the style is mostly based on rock and ...


4

Where it's used is irrelevant. No genre demands a particular type of voice, a particular sound, etc. Well, opera demands some special usage of some muscles, but other than that you find all sorts of characters dipping into all kinds of genres. That being said, it is true that a lot of rock artists have higher tenor voices, but that doesn't mean bassier ...


4

Most of the techniques for obtaining a raspy voice are probably not recommended. Generally speaking, a permanent raspiness is due to damaged vocal chords. Many of the well know raspy singers became raspy because of smoking.


4

Well, I can't give you a fully qualified answer, but I am currently working on the same problem myself. In my band, I am singing quite raw and agressive most of the time. Still clean singing but quite raw. At first I had some problems doing it, especially when the set list grew longer. After my first gig I had great problems regaining my voice because I ...


4

"I think that the E key is the V of the parallel minor scale" Note that a key can't be the V of anything, only a chord could be the V. But we don't have an E major chord here, we have a (blues) "riff" in E, and another riff in C. The song moves between these two riffs and none of the classical modulation techniques is applied. If you want to give a name to ...


3

Adding an ♭III on top of a I will give you the same notes as (albeit spelled differently from, and, i.m.h.o. more correctly than) the "Hendrix chord", or, more officially, the Dominant seventh sharp ninth chord, a chord that is used a lot by rock guitarists. An example: Because it has both a minor and a major third, it sounds very "bluesy", although it ...


3

Realizing that my guitar was a mid-range instrument helped me find what I believed to be the most satisfying tones i.e. not chasing extreme treble or bass. I have found distortion is good for tightening up the sound a little bit, and higher distortion tends to work better for single note passages and diads than it does for chord work. In general terms ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible