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10

The portion of Amadeus to which you refer is unfortunately a rather accurate depiction of a practice that has thankfully passed, that of using pounding large staff on stage to keep time. Jean-Baptiste Lully was literally an unfortunate casualty of this practice. As for Rubato, the Harvard Dictionary of Music offers two related definitions. The main ...


6

In order to answer your question, the question itself needs to be modified. To correct your thought, the Romantic Period did not occur specifically during Beethoven's lifetime, so it could therefore not have happened during his "middle" period. It is important to understand that when talking about labeling a period of music is to label a zeitgeist of ...


3

As far as I know there has never been (and probably never will be) a legally binding definition of "piano concerto", or any similar musical term like "sonata", "symphony", etc. But a competition with a "piano concerto" as the final round would usually mean "a concerto that is part of the standard classical repertoire". Even if a 10-minute excerpt from a ...


3

The defining point lies somewhere between the Third Symphony and the Fifth Symphony. In particular, I would argue that it's the Fourth Piano Concerto where Beethoven makes the most radical break from Classical to Romantic music, inasmuch as the harmonic freedom exploited in late Mozart and in Beethoven's earlier works is combined with breaking structural ...


3

One piece which is often mentioned is Beethoven's 3rd symphony. I don't think harmony alone could be a defining factor. Bach already has some pretty wild stuff. There's an extremely dissonant chord-progression piece (or section of a piece) by him, but I don't remember what it is (it's not the chromatic fantasie and fugue).


2

To my ear, the measure sounds like descending diminished 7th chords. Beats 1 and 2 f# diminished 7th and beats 3-4 d diminished 7th. (I'm not sure how Pat gets a d half-diminished chord with that c-flat so prominent, but maybe I've misread it.) On the first beat the g and b-flat are suspensions from the previous measure, which resolve down chromatically. ...


2

Interesting segment. I think that the second half of the measure can be heard as a D-diminished-7th in third inversion, and thus functions pretty normally as vii-dim-4/2 leading to the I6/4 of the following measure that isn't in your example. The Db in the top voice admittedly complicates that analysis, but I don't think it's dispositive. The first half of ...


1

If I remember correctly, there is a table of examples for pianists, for modulating to any key in this period book from the Silent Film era: Musical Accompaniment of Moving Pictures: A Practical Manual for Pianists and Organists by Edith Lang and George West. Modulations were a significant part of the arsenal of silent film accompanists, because they usually ...


1

I would first try to learn what features a "good" melody has or at least types of features make a melody sound like you want it to. There is a free PDF book here that's pretty good: https://ia902605.us.archive.org/16/items/exercisesinmelo00goetgoog/exercisesinmelo00goetgoog.pdf Goetschius does give one a basis for writing melodies. Then I'd analyze lots of ...


1

Yes, the "Warsaw Concerto" is a piano concerto, and I have heard of high school students playing it as a graduation piece. It is very good for that purpose because it is short and sounds much more difficult to play than it actually is. For the same reasons, it is not likely to impress competition judges. It is very close to Edvard Grieg's piano concerto ...



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