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10

Of course it can cause stiff fingers. Or sore wrists, arms, shoulders, backs, hips, necks. The causes are bad posture, too much guitar weight, or over-stressing muscles and joints from overuse. Getting the action lowered can help. If you use heavy gauge strings consider switching to some that are lighter. Some players like heavy strings for the sound, but ...


10

Assuming you're using a traditional right-handed setup, if you want a permanent fix, you're probably going to have to relearn how to pick. The cause of RSIs related to music are usually the result of excess tension somewhere in the body. For a guitar picking hand, you might want to look up materials related to violin bow hold, since excess tension in this ...


6

Have you tried adjusting the position of your bass while playing? I find that the higher the bass sits, the less stress on my wrist. I could never understand how bassists like Krist Novoselic could possibly be comfortable with the bass slung so low.


4

I've worried about this same thing in the past. Unless the symptoms are unbearable you should be able to make some simple adjustments and avoid further harm. The easiest way to describe the most gentle picking hand position is to straighten your wrist so it isn't bent at all and then position your guitar in such a way that the strings end up in the proper ...


3

It only started to hurt after you began playing longer, and more often. So, the solution is to slow down a bit and be more consistent in your practicing. Shorter, gentler, but more often, giving your body a chance to adjust. You may be overloading your body, if after weeks or months of not playing much, you suddenly begin to play for hours. As you get ...


3

Guitar playing is a physical activity that involves muscles and varying degrees of tension. Provided that all things are equal: a) your posture is correct or relaxed (ie. not slouching or twisted) b) the instrument is comfortable and easy to play (eg. low action compared to high) c) the combination of your posture and instrument is correct (ie. you've not ...


2

I agree with all of the answers that have been posted here. I would also stress the importance of learning to use your larger muscle groups whenever possible. A lot of the time, when employing certain techniques, we wind up over-using our wrists and forearms when larger muscle groups, like the bicep-area, are perfectly suited to take over and relieve the ...


1

Look back on times when you may have had a trauma inflicted on your hands or fingers. It will come back in the later years of your life . playing guitar actually after I get the stiffness out is a great way to keep the fingers from succumbing to the affects of arthritis. I find after doing a few stretching exercises with the fingers and using DMSO ( horse ...


1

I don't agree. I also recently started playing guitar excessively without engaging in any other activity and I am also struggling with stiff fingers (especially in the first ligament of my index and ring finger). This mainly due to the new song I'm practicing containing "unfimiliar" chords like Gm, Cm, Bm.


1

BS! You cannot get stiff fingers in any sort of way from playing guitar, it's the exact opposite. When you start playing guitar, your tendants start to become more elestic, your muscles obtain more control and you are able to control your fingers accurately without any problem. Rock climbing on the other hand forces the muscles to become tougher, less ...


1

I also have stiff fingers and also play music. I'm wondering whether mine is a form of dystonia, sometimes caused by overuse. (I have been diagnosied with having dystonia in my legs, but since then it is now also effecting my fingers). You may find it helpful to research dystonia in musicians on youtube.



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