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18

Great Question, Edgar! I'm guessing if you've played some of the Real Book and such that you've heard of Jamey Aebersold. If not, you definitely need to check him out and volumes 1, 2, 3, and 54 are very common for beginners. However, if you've exhausted the Jamey Aebersold path and are still unsure of where to go, my best advice is to listen to Jazz ...


8

Altissimo is just a name for notes above what is (or used to be, at least) considered higher than the "normal" range of the instrument. Most saxophones can play up to written F or F-sharp above the treble staff normally just by using side keys that open tone holes farther up the saxophone to make the air column shorter along with the octave vent opening. ...


8

As has been said so many times - get a good teacher - at least for a while. I believe anyone can learn to play an instrument by themselves - if they live long enough !! A teacher will guide you to a suitable sax, be it soprano, alto tenor or baritone (quite expensive). Watching videos and using tutor books is good, but they won't answer a question you ...


8

Edit: my use of the word "embouchure" is apparently not in accordance to the common meaning. See comments below. You should perhaps mentally replace all instances of the word embouchure with something like "shape of oral cavity". Apologies and thanks to NReilingh for pointing it out. For practicing overtones, first you need to get your embouchure used to ...


7

All instruments are equally difficult for different reasons. You can't escape by choosing an "easy" instrument because there are none. All pitches from all instruments have overtones. It is impossible not to use an overtone as they are inherent in the physical properties of vibration that actuate the pitch. It is precisely the reliance on the ear to ...


7

To follow up Wheat's definition answer, here's how I would play this: When playing glisses on wind instruments, especially in a contemporary or jazz context, the change in pitch should be as continuous as possible. In contrast, a piano is only capable of playing absolutely defined pitches, so glisses all sound like a fast scale (chromatic or otherwise). ...


7

Something to keep in mind when you practice overtones is that the embouchure shouldn't really change, but the position of the tongue in your mouth will change significantly (pay attention, for example, to how your tongue moves in your mouth when you whistle an octave). A common mistake is to tighten you mouth on the mouthpiece harder when playing ...


7

If you were my student, I would have you begin by working on your basic sound. I am presuming that you are playing alto saxophone and have already found suitable equipment (instrument, mouthpiece, and reeds, along with other needed accessories) and are able to get a sound generally. Start by playing only the mouthpiece (with reed, of course). Make sure ...


7

Other ideas that might help: For all of the different types of chords that you know how to play, try out each of the twelve possible harmonic intervals that you can play above the root of that chord type, and understand the kind of sensations and emotions that each sound evokes. Once you discover that you love the sounds of particular harmonic intervals ...


6

I am assuming for this answer that you are wanting to adjust commercial reeds made from cane (not synthetic materials), and that you are not trying to make your own reeds from blanks or from stalks of cane. I have always felt that my time with the saxophone was too limited as it was. So, I always wanted to keep the reed work as simple and quick as possible ...


6

First, of course, is to play single notes. The Sax is a single-voice instrument, and double stops will not sound sax-y. Next, you'll have to change the attack-decay-sustain-release characteristics of the guitar to match the saxophone. The sax has sustain as long as the player has breath, and there are techniques like circular breathing that expand that. You ...


5

Is this a school band? As a band director, you should feel comfortable triaging each instrument yourself. Were I in this situation, I would go fetch my own soprano sax mouthpiece, take the instrument, and either verify it is working correctly or demonstrate the correct embouchure. Those are really the only two possibilities: either there's a major ...


5

If you are just need the "comping" (chords and rhythm) check out iReal b for iOS and Android devises. When I purchased it, it came with a huge library of all the standard Jazz tunes, but since then they have faced some legal challenges. Now the app does not come with any tunes, but you can download a pack of 1200 Jazz standards from their user form (the app ...


5

This type of technique is known as a timbral trill where normal fingerings are toggled with false or alternate fingerings in order to produce subtle timbral shifts without actually changing pitch. Technically speaking, it is actually a repeat tremolo as the pitch is being changed at the microtonal level due to tuning and intonation of the instrument and ...


5

Okay, I hit google and did some research. The book you want to read is The Saxophone by Stephen Cottrell. It has a chapter, eight, "The Saxophone as Symbol and Icon". As I thought, long before the sax was associated with love, it was associated with sex, and it was substantially sexualized because of its use in early jazz, and thus it got tangled up in ...


4

It sounds like you have a good start at addressing the issue, actually. There is really no shortcut to dealing with the palm key notes. If you were practicing a tricky passage in a written-out piece, I would suggest starting very slowly and working your way up to tempo. I would also suggest working on evenness by practicing in "rhythms." What I mean by ...


4

Saxophone at an advanced level will require you to do a bunch of stuff with your throat (voicing) that you probably won't be used to as a trombonist. I would personally recommend that you keep your trombone practice up as you begin to learn saxophone. The embouchures use somewhat different muscle groups, so practicing both daily will keep you on your toes ...


4

Tips on proper flute embouchure: Aperture (space between your lips) should look like a flat football. Use a mirror! Think of whistling = corners of mouth together and open aperture, then bring corners back and down (like a frown.) Lips should be smooth so air stream can be smooth. Aim air stream for edge on the far side of the opening (that's where the air ...


4

When I am starting a beginner on saxophone or clarinet, I tell the student to align the reed so that it looks like the tip of the reed lines up with the tip of the mouthpiece when the student is holding the mouthpiece with the reed facing them. In doing so, typically, when viewed from the non-reed side of the mouthpiece, the reed will appear to protrude ...


4

I picked up an excellent second hand one for £200, so I would suggest looking in pawn shops and second hand shops as well as new. Things to look for in a 2nd hand one: all the keys work smoothly each note is in tune no dents or dings consistent tone across the full range That's about it really - I tried 3 different tenor saxophones, which were all fine, ...


4

Have you considered a brass instrument like trombone or euphonium? For me, the embouchures share some important characteristics, while still being distinct enough that one shouldn't mess up the other. If you are an advanced player and plan on pursuing music as a career, I would highly recommend continuing to practice bassoon throughout marching season, ...


4

The first example is a glissando. Wikipedia defines this as "A continuous, unbroken glide from one note to the next that includes the pitches between." The second example is a fall-off, meaning to glissando downward in pitch to an unspecified point (you choose how far to go), possibly with a rapid decrescendo to silence.


4

Check out: Band in a Box for Windows and Macintosh iReal b for iOS, Android and Macintosh SmartMusic for Windows, Macintosh, and soon for the iPad.


4

Disclaimer: I’m a fellow sax player and have more or less never blown into a clarinet. As you probably know a clarinet does not have an octave key (it has a key which makes the clarinet jump to the fifth of the octave instead). Because of that, you shouldn’t expect fingerings between saxophone and clarinet to be related at all. Other than that, I’m ...


4

This question is not specific to saxophone. Anyone who has learned an instrument has run into the question of ‘Are exercises necessary, or can I learn to play well without them?’ Strictly speaking, exercises are not necessary to play at a high level, but they are very helpful. To play at a high level, you need to be able to practice specific techniques and ...


4

Playing quietly through a sax is all about having a sufficient embouchure (mouth position/tension), to create a sound when pushing less air through. It's very normal to initially be playing loud when first learning the sax, and your embouchure is less developed - unfortunately this develops mainly through sustained (loud) practice. I wouldn't say there's a ...


3

Even if the question has an accepted answer I would like to leave my answer to tell you about my encouraging experience with the saxophone. I never had any musical education but that didn't stop me from buying a Xaphoon In July 2006. I played the thing by ear for a few months. It was dreadful at start but the sound got better sounding after 6 months. Around ...


3

No. 2. C blues. Really, that's all I wanted to say.


2

I'm actually fairly certain that's a soprano horn (long time alto player myself). I'd have a hard time guessing what mouth-piece / reed combination would produce that on a soprano, but you can get something similar on an alto with a good thick reed (4 maybe?) and a hard rubber mouth piece. You could also check out things like the spoiler here (check the ...


2

My answer starts with (and assumes) the definition of glissando provided by @Wheat Williams And basically disagrees with the first (currently accepted) answer by @NReilingh NReilingh says: The playing technique for this kind of gliss on saxophone will involve a mixture of embouchure bend and fingering, and the emphasis should be on the embouchure. ...



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