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8

Minor pent works well over major chords, but not vice versa. Add the 'blue' note to both maj. and min. pents for a little spice. Try the full major scale notes on major songs. Try the full minor scales (3 of them!) on minor songs. Use the Mixolydian mode for major songs. Use the Dorian mode for minor songs. Use the Lydian mode for major songs. On major songs ...


7

Think of modes as the scale starting off at different notes. So, yes there are modes both for the harmonic and melodic minor scales. In jazz, the melodic minor scale isn't the same as the classical one. It is the same while ascending and descending. So, the C melodic minor scale would be C D Eb F G A B C. here are the melodic minor modes: The harmonic ...


6

The dots indicate the notes that are in the C major scale. The red ones are C. The "patterns" are places where you can easily reach all of the notes of the scale. For example, in Pattern 4, you place your index finger on the 7th fret, and then you can play a C major scale 2 octaves (plus an extra note on top and bottom) just with your 4 fingers, without ...


5

The only difference in a major scale and its relative minor, is the tonic center. When you solo on C major scale, you play with the C as your tonic. If you change that, to A (with the A natural minor scale), you will focus on another note and the whole outcome will sound different. Another way to see what difference the change in the tonic makes are modes....


4

I empathise with you. For years, I played like that. Each solo was learned individually. Then it was realised that some players tended to use the same set of notes in a lot of their solos. For instance, pentatonic minor. Once it was realised that the sound of that scale was distinctive, I could recognise the sound of the same set of notes in other solos.So, ...


3

Yes, they would change. Try to think of the notes not on the fret, but on the specific position on the string. So, if you lower the tuning on that string, let's say by a whole tone, the note that was on the 5th fret would move up to the 7th fret. Similarly if you tune your strings up. If you tune the whole bass/guitar a whole tone lower, then the fingerings ...


3

First of there isn't an "official" augmented scale. What people typically call the augmented scale is actually a scale known as the Lydian Augmented scale which is a mode of the ascending melodic minor scale that starts on the third scale degree and in C looks like this: C D E F♯ G♯ A B C There are two different types of diminished scales that are ...


3

In the end you can use pretty much any arbitrary scales, switch between them and still sound awesome, as long as there's tasteful structure to it. For example if the song is currently in E minor, try putting in some phrases in D, F, F# or G major diatonic scales, but regularly return to the familiar Em pentatonic. My general advice would be to listen to ...


3

Strictly speaking, the notes of E natural minor are: E F# G A B C D E. So, if you want to use notes only from that scale, the chord would be B D F#. But in almost all the genres of music (even pop), it is really really common to borrow chords from other scales. In your example, you could borrow the dominant ( V ) chord from the E major scale (or the E ...


2

The leading note is the seventh degree of the major - and minor - when that note is one semitone below the l, tonic, or root.It's called leading as it suggests a tendency to rise to the tonic next. However, it loses that propensity when it's lowered, as in some minors, and subsequently gets called the 'flattened leading note'. If you're wondering which one ...


2

The term "leading tone" is equivalent to "scale degree seven of the major key." This doesn't mean that it's only found in a major key, just that it's the same pitch as the pitch that is scale degree seven of the major key. It is always a diatonic half step below tonic. In E minor, the leading tone is D-sharp. Meanwhile, scale degree seven of the natural ...


2

Without wanting to sound too abstract, I'd recommend learning guitar solos from musicians you enjoy listening too, then try to copy their ideas into your own improvisation. I think what is key is developing your "musical ear" where you can hear in your head what you want to play and know how to translate that onto the guitar. This takes many years of ...


2

Yes, scale and chord shapes do change if you use an alternate tuning. If the open note was an "E" but has been changed, then all of the other notes on that string will move to other positions and you'll need to play a different "shape" to reach those new positions. In this sort of situation the best thing to do is get a piece of paper and draw a new ...


2

Pitch matching and ear training is very useful for learning. One of the primary goals is simply to accustom your voice and your ear to a consistent set of pitches or intervals, enabling you to reproduce them with ease and recognize if you're singing off-key. Singing along with scales also helps with things like quick note transitions when doing runs of ...


2

Matt Putnam offered an excellent answer but based on some of the comments a more complete explanation might be helpful for those who still are not sure how scale patterns can be useful for a guitarist. TLDR - skip to summary. The guitar and similar fretted instruments give the player options for multiple places on different strings and frets to play any ...


1

Regarding: "Figuring out the difference between major and relative minor scales" (and more). If you know the C Major scale, and the relative minor, A minor, then you know the scales of two of the modes, C Ionian, and A Aeolian. You should know you can play scales with all of the other modes, too and they all sound different, but all are from a Major scale. ...


1

It seems like you're having difficulties picking up a tune by hear and reproducing it with your voice. If it's the first time you're trying to do this, it's normal and no cause for worries. Like any sensory system in our body, singing requires "calibration". If you have never sung before, your vocal apparatus may not know what it needs to do to give each ...


1

Yes. If the guitar was tuned to just drop D, then all the scale notes on the bottom string would need to be fretted 2 frets higher. With other tunings, because the open string notes have changed, and also changed in relation to each other then adjustments would have to be made all over. The same scenario would happen on bass, although the most usual change ...


1

Every scale has modes. As you shift what note in the pattern you start on, you come up with a different pattern that is related to the original scale pattern. The names of the modes however, are not named the same way as the diatonic modes. The names of the modes are not based off scale degrees, but how the notes look compared to the scales/modes of the ...


1

Scales tend to reflect reality. It's not that someone once came up with a theory from thin air. Notes that sound good together get put together in ascending/descending order to be called scales. To an extent it's what humans do. Then players can think along the lines of 'if I want that sound, I can use that set of notes and it'll largely work'. The Blues ...


1

As technical exercises, you normally do scales, arpeggios and chord progressions. If you want to do a richer combination of those, like doing different things in different hands, etc... you normally don't do exercises, but play Studies. Czerny has hundreds of them, for different levels, and some of them might be useful for what you want. Problem is that ...


1

A diatonic scale is a scale made of seven notes, with five whole tones and two half tones. Therefore a major scale is a diatonic scale, but a diatonic scale might not be a major scale. Some may use "the diatonic scale" to name the "major scale" interchangeably, but that is in theory wrong. In some contexts you might be understood if you use "diatonic" to ...


1

There are no rules on this sort of thing, it's far too subjective. Why rely on someone else's idea? Why not try out a few of your own. There are not that many options.Usually, thumbs come in far more usefully on white keys, whereas the longer fingers, usually middle and ring work more effectively on the farther away black keys. But that's not a rule, and ...


1

Good questions! Well Lets do it step by step; 1- You do not have to know if you are singing is a G or Ab, it doesn't matter, if you can transpose thats enough... 2- About knowing if it is W (first note) or WHWWWH... hum well this is not too important but is more than your first question, lets say you want to know if you are sing a melody (a motive) based on ...


1

Q1. Probably a better scale shape to learn and use will be (for example) the one in A that encompasses the 4th to 7th frets, starting on the fat string, 5th fret. It's good as it means you can play two whole octaves, without a hand position shift. Most songs will fit into that, and it's moveable down to key F, and up as far as your hand will reach. You can ...


1

1- I really don't understand this question. But it sounds like you need to work on memorizing/understanding the fretboard. 2- Keep four fingers in a single position and learn a scale (CAGED or otherwise) then focus on connecting scales to stay in a single key up and down the fretboard. Then, especially for guitar and play-along, learn your modes. Between ...



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